PresentationPDF Available

Abstract WOCMAP congress 2019 - Assessment of cannabis and its components by the WHO: overview of the implications for traditional and complementary medicine and research.

Authors:

Abstract

The World Health Organization (WHO) is the leading standardization entity and public health referent globally in relation with Traditional and Complementary Medicines (TCM). Beside this role, WHO is also directly mandated by the International Drug Control Conventions (IDCC) as the provider of official scientific and independent assessments of drugs, including herbal materials, for the purpose of scheduling (i.e., determining the extent of use-related harms and the scope of therapeutic properties of psychoactive plants, fungi, products or substances in order to categorize and hierarchically list them) within the IDCC. Different categories of products and substances derived from Cannabis sativa L. (C.) are currently scheduled within the IDCC, although having never been assessed by the WHO nor its preceding international organizations with similar mandate. For this reason, the WHO has been undertaking since 2016 a process of review and assessment of these C.-related products and substances, recommending important changes in their level and status of scheduling within the IDCC. We comprehensively followed the WHO assessment processes since its inception and reviewed the contents submitted to its independent Expert Committee in charge of the assessment at all stages. We analysed the outcome, and estimated the impacts and consequences of the changes in IDCC scheduling status of C.-related products and substances for the medical and research fields. We also analysed the consequences of the linked reintegration of C. within the scope of TCM and in the stream of work of the WHO’s relevant departments in charge of TCM and other herbal health products. WHO’s new official position acknowledges that C. is legitimate in medicine, considers herbal formulations less liable to abuse than isolated compounds, encourages governments to provide access to a variety of formulations while leaving them flexibility in the choice of products and policies to implement. It also shows a needed renewed conceptual address of C. and other potentially harmful scheduled herbal materials, that include methodologies and practical approaches from the field of Medicinal and Aromatic Plant studies. The presentation will relate the history of that assessment, its main findings, and present our own research conclusions explaining how the international policy landscape surrounding C. in medicine has evolved, while assessing the impact on the involvement of other academic disciplines, and policy frameworks needed to ensure a safe and compliant access to phytotherapeutical C.
WOCMAP VI
13-17 November 2019 - Famagusta - N.Cyprus
6th World Congress on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants
Congress Programme & Abstract Book
Supporting Organizations
Sponsors
The Organising Committee is thankful to the above organizations and sponsors for their contributions and support
WOCMAP VI
13-17 November 2019 - Famagusta - N.Cyprus
6th World Congress on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants
IV 6th World Congress on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants
COMMITTEES
Congress President
Prof. Dr. K. Husnu Can Baser
ICMAP President
Prof. Dr. Akos Mathe
ICMAP & Congress Secretary
Prof. Dr. Fatih Demirci
International Organizing Committee
Mark Blumenthal, USA Chlodwig Franz, Austria
Salvador Canigueral, Spain Phlip Kerr, Australia
Jacobus Elo, South Africa Umesh Patil, India
Local Organizing Committee
Ayhan Altıntaş Neşe Kırımer
İhsan Çalış Müberra Koşar
Betül Demirci Yavuz Bülent Köse
Hale Gamze Ağalar Gülmira Özek
İlhan Gürbüz Temel Özek
Gökalp İşcan Kenan Turgut
Murat Kartal
WOCMAP VI
13-17 November 2019 - Famagusta - N.Cyprus
6th World Congress on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants
85
November 13-17, 2019 - Famagusta, Northern Cyprus
OP-69 Assessment of Cannabis and its Components by the World Health
Organization: Overview of the Implications for Traditional and Complementary
Medicine and Research
Kenzi Riboulet-Zemouli,
Independent researcher, Barcelona, Catalonia, 08001, Spain
email kenzi@zemou.li
The World Health Organization (WHO) is the leading standardization entity and public health referent
globally in relation with Traditional and Complementary Medicines (TCM). Beside this role, WHO
is also directly mandated by the International Drug Control Conventions (IDCC) as the provider of
oicial scientific and independent assessments of drugs, including herbal materials, for the purpose
of scheduling (i.e., determining the extent of use-related harms and the scope of therapeutic properties
of psychoactive plants, fungi, products or substances in order to categorize and hierarchically list
them) within the IDCC. Dierent categories of products and substances derived from Cannabis
sativa L. (C.) are currently scheduled within the IDCC, although having never been assessed by the
WHO nor its preceding international organizations with similar mandate. For this reason, the WHO
has been undertaking since 2016 a process of review and assessment of these C.-related products and
substances, recommending important changes in their level and status of scheduling within the IDCC.
We comprehensively followed the WHO assessment processes since its inception and reviewed the
contents submitted to its independent Expert Committee in charge of the assessment at all stages. We
analysed the outcome, and estimated the impacts and consequences of the changes in IDCC scheduling
status of C.-related products and substances for the medical and research fields. We also analysed the
consequences of the linked reintegration of C. within the scope of TCM and in the stream of work of the
WHO’s relevant departments in charge of TCM and other herbal health products. WHO’s new oicial
position acknowledges that C. is legitimate in medicine, considers herbal formulations less liable to
abuse than isolated compounds, encourages governments to provide access to a variety of formulations
while leaving them exibility in the choice of products and policies to implement. It also shows a needed
renewed conceptual address of C. and other potentially harmful scheduled herbal materials, that include
methodologies and practical approaches from the field of Medicinal and Aromatic Plant studies. The
presentation will relate the history of that assessment, its main findings, and present our own research
conclusions explaining how the international policy landscape surrounding C. in medicine has evolved,
while assessing the impact on the involvement of other academic disciplines, and policy frameworks
needed to ensure a safe and compliant access to phytotherapeutical C.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any citations for this publication.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any references for this publication.