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L’infrastructure de recherche « Pôle de données et services pour le système Terre », à la pointe des techniques d’imagerie et de cartographie numérique

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Abstract

Earth System, an infrastructure research program of data and services on the cutting edge of digital imagery and cartography Observe, understand and predict the history, operation and evolution of the Earth system, subject as it is to global changes, is a fundamental topic for research and a necessity for pursuing sustainable development goals. This calls for an interoperable infrastructure to speed up the extraction, analysis, diffusion and intelligent use of data, and for indicators and models derived from national and international systems of observation. Intended for scientists, public officials and innovators, these products and services are accessible via the Internet portals that, used for space missions and observation networks, support sustainable development. Coordinate, federate and optimize the existing set of institutions, arrangements and means are among the major ambitions of the Earth System program (IR Système Terre) with its European and international aspirations.
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