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Transformative transition coaching: a framework to facilitate transformative learning during career transitions

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Abstract

Corporate leaders are frequently promoted into senior positions without the requisite capabilities to be successful in such career transitions. A significant proportion fails with substantial negative personal and organisational implications. Incumbents need to adapt through a flexible learning process that transcends superficial change. Transformative learning alters deeply held perspectives and world views and has long-term efficacy, while transition coaching, used sporadically at present, is a personalised learning process. This research created a novel synergy between transformative learning theory and transition coaching using a combination of grounded theory principles (16 participants) and canonical action research (6 participants). The findings yielded two results: the transformative transition coaching framework that appears to facilitates deep, lasting changes in an individual’s perspectives and world views during senior career transitions; and a novel coaching state transition notation that could help coaches to graphically track coachees’ transition progress. By undergoing transformative learning through coaching, transitioning leaders may increase their chances of success in their current and future roles. https://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/9RF5ISWVMAHKW73C9W3S/full?target=10.1080/09585192.2019.1688376

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... No processo de coaching, é imprescindível delinear os objetivos que possibilitarão a mudança de comportamento, sendo esses eleitos por prioridades até que se tornem hábitos e, por conseguinte, capacidades desenvolvidas (Reis & Nakata, 2010;Diochon & Nizet, 2015). Os objetivos do coaching podem incluir o cultivo das habilidades interpessoais que desenvolvem e mantêm uma rede complexa de relacionamentos comerciais e promovem habilidades de gestão e autogestão (Terblanche, 2019;Athanasopoulou & Dopson, 2017;Campone, 2015 ...
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This critical literature review is an attempt to build upon the theoretical debate of Mezirow's transformative learning theory by investigating what the empirical studies have to say about a perspective transformation. The review finds much support for Mezirow's theory, but at the same time suggests a need to reconceptualize the process of a perspective transformation. The review discloses a learning process that needs to recognize to a greater degree the significant influence of context, the varying nature of the catalyst of the process, the minimization of the role of critical reflection and increased role of other ways of knowing and relationships, and an overall broadening of the definitional outcome of a perspective transformation. Research needs to continue, particularly in the areas of cultural diversity, the fostering of transformative learning in the classroom, and the nature of and relationship between critical reflection and other ways of knowing. Designs of research including other methods beyond interviews, such as observations and content analysis in an ongoing educational context, would also be valuable.
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This article provides a brief commentary on the literature review and the two studies presented in this special issue of The Psychologist-Manager Journal, with an emphasis on their value in substantiating the practical application of the Leadership Pipeline concept. In particular, the author provides recommendations for mentors and coaches who work with managers-in-transition. The author uses the triple challenge notion of what tasks, activities, and functions managers-in-transition need to let go, preserve, and add on at each successive level of management as an organizing principle for translating the research findings into practical applications. The author concludes with a discussion of the distressed manager-in-transition. If mentors and coaches can understand, empathize with, and cope effectively with people in distress without becoming excessively anxious themselves, they can more effectively help managers-in-transition to navigate the promotional crossroads and increase their likelihood of making a successful upward transition.
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With the interest of studying managerial ineffectiveness in organizations and in studying differences among Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Millennials, this research examined whether managers in different generations showed different signs of derailment (e.g., problems with interpersonal relationships, difficulty leading a team, difficulty changing or adapting, failure to meet business objectives, and too narrow functional orientation). With such knowledge, managers can effectively deal with these problem areas to avoid possible career derailment. Data from 5,249 U.S. managers (n = 2,481 Baby Boomers; n = 2,480 Generation X; n = 288 Millennials) revealed that managers in older generations were more likely to show derailment signs than were managers in younger generations. Differences, however, were of small practical significance in nature. These results advance knowledge by showing that generations are more similar than they are different in workplace performance. The authors discuss the implications of the findings to help managers regardless of their generation deal with possible derailment.
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The development of leaders is a stated goal of most organizations, yet a validated framework and theory for leader development does not yet fully exist, nor is there a method for determining who is developmentally ready to engage in leader development. The authors of this article provide a framework for examining how one can accelerate leader development. They propose that leader developers first focus on assessing and then building the developmental readiness of individual leaders, as well as the developmental readiness of the organization as prerequisite steps for accelerating positive leader development. They identify and discuss 5 specific constructs comprising their initial modeling of developmental readiness (i.e., learning goal orientation, developmental efficacy, self-concept clarity, self-complexity, and metacognitive ability), as well as suggest methods for assessing and developing these 5 components. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
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The purpose of this study was to develop a model of leadership transition based on an integrative review of literature. The article establishes a compelling case for focusing on leadership transitions as an area for study and leadership development practitioner intervention. The proposed model in this study identifies important success factors leading to a successful leader transition into an existing team. Specifically, the article discusses such success factors as managing first impressions, aligning expectations, recognizing stress, managing feedback seeking, building relationships, and using structured methods for leadership development. It is anticipated that this study will help leadership and organization development practitioners who work to develop leadership capacity better understand the potential consequences associated with ignoring factors affecting leader transitions. Furthermore, this study offers insights into success factors that practitioners can leverage in developing interventions to help leaders transition.
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Previous studies exploring how leaders make successful promotion transitions overlooked the turn from mid-level to functional management. Little research exists that describes this transition from the experience of successful executives. The goal of the present study was to examine the essential structure of managerial role transition. This article discusses the transition strategies of successful executives from multiple countries who work in a Fortune 20 global technology corporation. Drawing upon previously untested models and conducting qualitative research the writer argues that leader effectiveness in making the transition into executive management requires shifts in four domains: cognitive, relational, behavioral, and role perspective. Within and pertaining to each transitional domain, transitional leaders combine four approaches: releasing, learning, adapting, and adjusting. The researcher provides a testable theory and model of managerial role transition.
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The last significant review of research about transformative learning was in 1998 and was mostly focused on unpublished dissertations. In response, this paper reviews an exhaustive body of research conducted since that time, involving 40 studies, published in peer-review journals with a lens of analysis of new findings and insights on transformative learning theory. The review finds less research less about identifying transformative experiences in different setting, and more about fostering transformative learning and the complex nature of critical reflection, relationships, the nature of a perspective transformation and the role of context. Furthermore, even though qualitative designs still dominate, they have become more sophisticated and creative, including longitudinal and mixed-method designs and the use of video and photography.
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What is there about Mezirow's theory which promotes such divergent interpretations? A key, perhaps, is that his theory is directed at the intersection of the individual and social. (Tennant, 1993, p. 36)
Outcomes of this empirical study demonstrated that executive coaching is an effective method of leadership development. One hundred fourteen executives and 42 coaches were surveyed using instruments designed to gather both quantitative and qualitative data. Results indicated that executive change occurred in 5 areas: people management, relationships with managers, goal setting and prioritization, engagement and productivity, and dialogue and communication. This study also highlights the importance of coach selection, executive commitment to behavioral change, and the role of good program and environmental support. The success of this coaching program also suggests that investment in well-designed and implemented programs can contribute to leadership development and the retention of talent. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved). (from the journal abstract)