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Emotional Connection: The Importance of the Brand Voice in Social Media for Global Growth

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Abstract

Branding plays an important role in establishing a brand’s visibility and position in international markets. The brand’s voice is the foundation for establishing a relationship with an audience, and social media is a powerful tool in this process. The author examines social media marketing in the global marketplace through the lens of two dimensions of the Hofstede national culture model—individualism vs. collectivism, and masculinity vs. femininity—and posits that a careful blending of an understanding of cultural dimensions, content localization, and brand voice and consistency results in social media communication that connects emotionally with its intended audience, thereby building both relationships with consumers and brand loyalty.

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A global voice for global growth
  • Interbrand
Four ways social media impacts emotional branding
  • Businessesgrow
The 6-D model of national culture
  • Geert Hofstede
Individualism and collectivism
  • C Kagitçibasi
Global marketing and advertising: Understanding cultural paradoxes
  • M De Mooij
  • M Mooij De