Article

Using a Bio-Psycho-Social Approach for Students With Severe Challenging Behaviours

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Abstract

What teachers learn about classroom management in education classes often results in behaviour strategies that do not account for the individuality of each student. Teachers would benefit greatly from a common formula for effective problem solving and decision making with regard to choosing when to use the strategies in their "tool box." The solution proposed is the building of an individual biopsychosocial, multimodal profile for each student with chronic challenging behaviours.

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... 170-173) in late 2019. Tim then further educated himself with several articles which describe and expand on the ideas (Borell-Carrió, 2004;Reisinger, 2014), while Curtis read and considered further about its relation to performance (Cotterill, 2017). Although Tim had heard from a variety of sources over the years that "everything is connected," such as in some highly recommended TED talks by Tom Chi (TED, 2016) and Robert Sapolsky (2017) and from his father when he was a teenager, he was not aware that the medical field in particular had had a hard time breaking away from what was known as the biomedical model, in which medical doctors mainly looked at health only in terms of the physical body and ignored other possible psychological and social influences. ...
... Engel and colleagues produced a more expansive positive model called the biopsychosocial model (Engel, 1977). There have been several articles on its application to special needs education (Reisinger, 2014), but there is little about its application toward education at large, which could also align positive psychology and sociology with our learning goals. We would like to begin taking this next step in this article. ...
... The biopsychosocial model has of course also been criticized as too eclectic, i.e., "anything goes" and thus sometimes "unscientific," as humanism currently tends to be. While it has been applied to special educational needs (Reisinger, 2014), it has not been widely applied to general education. Our contention is that it should be applied to everyday education, just as civility (Porath, 2016). ...
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Full-text available
In this short article, we propose that education could benefit greatly if students and teachers were tuned into the biopsychosocial parts of our holistic well-being, which is considered to be autonomy supportive, as a prerequisite of learning. Thus far, education has largely operated on a bias toward cognitive processes as the sole meaningful contributor to learning, focusing on the acquisition of knowledge while often seeing the biological, psychological, and social contextual contributions as unrelated. With the recent generation of positive psychology and positive sociology, researchers and educators alike are becoming more aware of the contribution that contextual well-being (i.e. considering biopsychosocial factors) has upon learning. This growing awareness suggests the need to broaden rather than narrow our understandings of causality both in the classroom and with learning at large. We propose that showing attention to this wider context could improve student learning substantially and support student development of a more sustainable autonomy.
... 170-173) in late 2019. Tim then further educated himself with several articles which describe and expand on the ideas (Borell-Carrió, 2004;Reisinger, 2014), while Curtis read and considered further about its relation to performance (Cotterill, 2017). Although Tim had heard from a variety of sources over the years that "everything is connected," such as in some highly recommended TED talks by Tom Chi (TED, 2016) and Robert Sapolsky (2017) and from his father when he was a teenager, he was not aware that the medical field in particular had had a hard time breaking away from what was known as the biomedical model, in which medical doctors mainly looked at health only in terms of the physical body and ignored other possible psychological and social influences. ...
... Engel and colleagues produced a more expansive positive model called the biopsychosocial model (Engel, 1977). There have been several articles on its application to special needs education (Reisinger, 2014), but there is little about its application toward education at large, which could also align positive psychology and sociology with our learning goals. We would like to begin taking this next step in this article. ...
... The biopsychosocial model has of course also been criticized as too eclectic, i.e., "anything goes" and thus sometimes "unscientific," as humanism currently tends to be. While it has been applied to special educational needs (Reisinger, 2014), it has not been widely applied to general education. Our contention is that it should be applied to everyday education, just as civility (Porath, 2016). ...
Article
Full-text available
My father encouraged me to go to Europe the summer before my last year in high school (at 16). He thought I was going to stay in a youth hostel in Geneva, but instead someone invited me to go with him to the Alps and he taught me how to hitch-hike by sticking out your thumb on the roadside. We hitched up into the Alps together. I hitched back by myself. Then hitched to southern France and up through Italy to Switzerland again and then around Switzerland. The most agentive-awakening 6 weeks of my life.
... El modelo biopsicosocial (BPS) como paradigma aplicado a procesos relacionados con temas de salud fue postulado por primera vez por el doctor estadounidense George L. Engel (1913Engel ( -1999. Supone un atractivo paradigma de enfoque interdisciplinario (Engel, 1977;1980), con muy recientes adaptaciones y revisiones en el campo de las ciencias médicas, en especial la psiquiatría (Davies y Roache, 2017; Johnson y Acabchuk, 2018) o de la intervención psicoeducativa (Reisinger, 2014). Desde su formulación original, el modelo propuesto por Engel (1977) supone la consideración de los tres factores en el diagnóstico de patologías y vías de terapia o curación. ...
Article
Full-text available
La profesión docente supone un uso intensivo de la voz como medio comunicativo y herramienta básica para gestión de la actividad en el aula. En el caso particular del docente de música, la salud y plenitud de sus capacidades fonadoras tiene una gran repercusión en la calidad y autosatisfacción de su vida laboral diaria. En esta investigación se indaga en las causas y consecuencias de las disfunciones vocales en futuros maestros de música. Se centra la atención en elementos biopsicosociales ligados a la personalidad, las conductas y las expectativas de la muestra, consistente en cinco casos seleccionados entre los estudiantes (N=124) de la mención de música en educación primaria de un centro universitario español de formación de profesorado. Para ello, se realizan entrevistas individuales en doble sesión, incluyendo ejercicios individuales de fonación, grabadas en video para su posterior análisis. También se aplica a la muestra la prueba de personalidad NEO PI-R, en versión en línea, de formato y corrección estandarizados para la población que corresponde. Tras un análisis exploratorio, categorización y triangulación de las fuentes, los resultados revelan una fuerte correspondencia entre elementos de personalidad ligados al neuroticismo, y los relacionados con los factores de responsabilidad. A su vez se hallan antecedentes y desencadenantes críticos, como aquéllos vinculados al entorno familiar y a conductas coincidentes. Se concluye la trascendencia de las disfunciones vocales para el futuro profesional del alumno, origen de angustia e incertidumbre, ante lo cual se requiere acompañamiento, formación, y prevención.
Article
( This reprinted article originally appeared in Science, 1977, Vol 196[4286], 129–236. The following abstract of the original article appeared in PA, Vol 59:1423. ) Although it seems that acceptance of the medical model by psychiatry would finally end confusion about its goals, methods, and outcomes, the present article argues that current crises in both psychiatry and medicine as a whole stem from their adherence to a model of disease that is no longer adequate for the work and responsibilities of either field. It is noted that psychiatrists have responded to their crisis by endorsing 2 apparently contradictory positions, one that would exclude psychiatry from the field of medicine and one that would strictly adhere to the medical model and limit the work of psychiatry to behavioral disorders of an organic nature. Characteristics of the dominant biomedical model of disease are identified, and historical origins and limitations of this reductionistic view are examined. A biopsychosocial model is proposed that would encompass all factors related to both illness and patienthood. Implications for teaching and health care delivery are considered.
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