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CLAREP JOURNAL OF ENGLISH AND LINGUISTICS ACADEMIC WRITING FOR AFRICA: THE JOURNAL ARTICLE 2

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  • Catholic University of Eichstätt-Ingolstadt Germany/University of Texas at Austin
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The Book Routledge has now published my book version of this text under the title Semiotics: The Basics. The online text (which is not the same) will continue to be available. The publisher's details of the book are here. Amazon UK lists it and readers may order it online; Amazon.com states that it will be stocked from March 2002 -readers from outside the UK who are in a hurry are therefore advised to order it from Amazon UK. Please support this site by ordering the book here. It shouldn't cost you any more than elsewhere and it will earn me more than my meagre royalty fee! Online ordering ISBN RRP (Pounds Sterling) Paperback edition 0-415-26594-0 9 ($15.95 US; 110,79 FF; DM 33,50; EUR 16,89-17,13) Hardback edition 0-415-26593-2 00 Note that it will be cheaper to buy the book than to print out the online version, and that the book will be much tidier to shelve and easier to browse! Praise for the Book 'This is the best introduction to semiotics I have read. The author combines a scholarly command of the subject with the ability to organise and present it in an enticing and informative way.
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Triangulation refers to the use of multiple methods or data sources in qualitative research to develop a comprehensive understanding of phenomena (Patton, 1999). Triangulation also has been viewed as a qualitative research strategy to test validity through the convergence of information from different sources. Denzin (1978) and Patton (1999) identified four types of triangulation: (a) method triangulation, (b) investigator triangulation, (c) theory triangulation, and (d) data source triangulation. The current article will present the four types of triangulation followed by a discussion of the use of focus groups (FGs) and in-depth individual (IDI) interviews as an example of data source triangulation in qualitative inquiry.