Conference Paper

Enhancing a Crowd-based Delivery Network with Mobility Predictions

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Conference Paper

Enhancing a Crowd-based Delivery Network with Mobility Predictions

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Abstract

In this paper, a new application domain for mobility predictions is presented. Based on the application domain new challenges arise in terms of when and how the mobility prediction has to be done. This results in three cases for mobility predictions, i.e. predicting some time beforehand, predicting before departure, and predicting when departed. Several approaches are introduced to tackle the three cases, which are evaluated empirically on the GeoLife dataset.

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