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How Post-Secondary Students with Mathematics Learning Disabilities Use Their Personal Electronic Devices to Support Their Academic Studies

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General report about exploratory study of how post-secondary students with mathematics learning disabilities use and adapt their use of their personal electronic devices to support their academic studies.
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