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5 A Critical Examination of the Influence of Systemic Racism in Shaping the African STEM Research Workforce

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Abstract

This chapter examines the various ways that systemic racism works to shape the STEM research workforce of people of African descent. The interest driving this work is not a desire to have “representative” numbers of African STEM professionals. Instead, the driving interest is to provide a detailed description of the dynamic role that systemic racism plays in making the African STEM research workforce look and function the way that it does.
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Fuller Jr., N. (2016). The united independent compensatory code/system/ concept: A textbook/workbook for thought, speech, and/or action for victims of racism (White supremacy) (Rev./exp. ed.). [n.p.]: Author.
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