Conference Paper

Fabrication of Tuned Lipss-Based Metallic Polarization Gratings

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Abstract

Surface nanostructuring has received increasing attention in recent years due to the wide range of applications in which it offers advantages. Particularly, Laser-Induced Periodic Surface Structures (LIPSS) have proven useful for surface functionalization. LIPSS are periodic formations generated in most materials when irradiated with linearly polarized radiation. The orientation of these structures is directly linked to the polarization of the incident light, while other parameters of their morphology such as period and depth can be controlled with the number of pulses, fluence, wavelength and pulse duration of the incident light.

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