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Implementation and Evaluation of Wright’s Competency Model

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Abstract

Wright's competency model is increasingly used by healthcare organizations around the globe. This article describes the implementation of Wright's model over a 4-year period. Creation of a steering group and decentralization of the effort were keys to success in achieving over 98% participation across all nursing areas and six other healthcare professions. Clinical and leadership staff were surveyed pre- and postimplementation on 11 measures. All levels of staff reported positive improvement in each measure.

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