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Relevance of artificial intelligence in politics

Authors:

Abstract

With the drawn of the 21st Century, modern technologies have overtaken the task of human labour. One of the emerging transformations is the relevance of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in political processes to empower and stimulate political participation for democratic consolidation. This paper explores the various types of Al applications, and current and future use of these technologies in political processes. Further, the paper also offers solutions for its proper implementation strategically as well as systematically
“NEW CHALLENGES IN CORPORATE GOVERNANCE: THEORY AND PRACTICE”
Naples, October 3-4, 2019
87
RELEVANCE OF ARTIFICIAL
INTELLIGENCE IN POLITICS
Avneet Kaur *
* Amity University, India
How to cite: Kaur, A. (2019). Relevance of artificial
intelligence in politics. New Challenges in Corporate
Governance: Theory and Practice, 87-88.
https://doi.org/10.22495/ncpr_24
Copyright © 2019 The Authors
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons
Attribution 4.0 International License (CC BY 4.0).
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Received: 08.07.2019
Accepted: 06.08.2019
DOI: 10.22495/ncpr_24
Keywords: Artificial
Intelligence, Internet,
Transparency, Citizen
Participation, Political
Process
JEL Classification: E24,
O33, O38, D72
Abstract
With the drawn of the 21st Century, modern technologies have overtaken
the task of human labour. One of the emerging transformations is the
relevance of Artificial Intelligence in political processes to empower and
stimulate political participation for democratic consolidation. Political
science emphasizes the participation of the masses in the promotion of
democracy. It is imperative to understand the application of such
technologies to undertake the political decision-making process. In
Democratic societies, technology is influenced by the social as well as
political conditioning of the existing systems. Much open society
promotes the generation of new ideas and the acceptance of new
innovations for the development of the nation. Around 20 years ago
Barber one of the famous academician raised a very important question
about the doubts of the role of modern technology in the development of
political structures. It was very clear from his assumption that with the
emergence of ICT technologies the conservative societies will
transformed into "knowledgeable societies". The use of these technologies
will be capable to store enormous data and process it when required by
humans. Further, Al-based technologies can easily connect individuals to
government leading to the formation of qualitative democracy. Citizens
can actively participate in political affairs without any interference of
mediocre. Further, these technologies allowed even the marginalized
people to translate in their own language for instance in India, there are
around 22 official languages and many other unofficial where Al
technologies have been used to solve the issue of language conversions.
In addition, during the election campaigns, the technologies can enhance
“NEW CHALLENGES IN CORPORATE GOVERNANCE: THEORY AND PRACTICE”
Naples, October 3-4, 2019
88
the awareness level of the individual by informing them about their
political choice and encouraging them to think about the negative as well
as positive repercussion s of their vote. Moreover, Al technologies can
play a larger role in extracting data from media, press and online blogs
that will provide the impetus for policymakers to understand the
implications of the decision on policy formulation.
Al-based technologies will be helpful in the gradual consolidation of
its institutions, procedures, cultural and ideological references, that is
related to the age of neoliberal politics. Hence Al technologies are such
programs that are reserved to work on the tasks performed by human
intelligence. In the future, these tasks will be used in reforming the
works of government organizations. These technologies can be of great
assistance in reducing administrative burdens and solve the complex
tasks by saving time and resources. In political scenario Al can play a
significant role in encouraging and involving citizens in democratic
processes such as providing the citizen with the appropriate information,
analysing fraud and corruption in the system, improving accelerating
crime rates, using prediction to target social services interventions,
anticipating cyber-attacks and personal information loss on public
websites. AI has the potential to have a great impact on the way citizens
experience and interact with their government. Through the use of Al
technologies efficiency of government, functioning will be enhanced.
These technologies will bring a transparent and accountable system that
will be programmed to detect any kind of fraud and inefficiency within
the governance process. Online support and technology have the potential
to lead to real action, e.g. voting, changes in legislation, or consensus in
building a society. The Internet and technology will likely be part of our
political landscape from here on, even as its shape changes with the
changes in new technology. However, there can be a negative impact of
these technologies in terms of privacy and ethical concerns of individuals
if they are not implemented systematically. This paper explores the
various types of Al applications, and current and future use of these
technologies in political processes. Further, the paper also offers solutions
for its proper implementation strategically as well as systematically.
REFERENCES
1. Charniak, E., & McDermott, D. (1985). Introduction to artificial intelligence.
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2. De Mul, J. (2010). Moral machines: ICTs as mediators of human agencies.
Research in Philosophy and Technology, 14(3), 226-236. https://doi.org/10.5840/
techne201014323
3. Hudson, V. M. (1991). Artificial intelligence and international politics. Boulder,
CO: Westview Press.
4. Kane, T. B. (2019). Artificial intelligence in politics: Establishing ethics.
IEEE Technology and Society Magazine, 38(1), 72-80. https://doi.org/10.1109/
MTS.2019.2894474
5. Luger, G. F. (1993). Artificial intelligence: Structures and strategies for complex
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Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.
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