ThesisPDF Available

IMMERSIVE WELL PATH PLANNING: THE ADDED VALUE OF INTERACTIVE IMMERSIVE VISUALIZATION

Abstract and Figures

Immersive well path planning: The added value of interactive immersive visualization Thesis directed by Professor Clayton Lewis The benefits of immersive visualization are primarily anecdotal; there have been few controlled users studies that have attempted to quantify the added value of immersion for problems requiring the manipulation of virtual objects. This research quantifies the added value of immersion for a real-world industrial problem: oil well path planning. An experiment was designed to compare human performance between an immersive virtual environment (IVE) and a desktop workstation with stereoscopic display. This work consisted of building a cross-environment application, capable of visualizing and editing a planned well path within an existing oilfield, and conducting an user study on that application. This work presents the results of sixteen participants who planned the paths of four oil wells. Each participant planned two well paths on a desktop workstation with a stereoscopic display and two well paths in a CAVE TM-like IVE. Fifteen of the participants completed well path editing tasks faster in the IVE than in the desktop environment, which is statistically significant (p < 0.001). The increased speed in the IVE was complimented by an increase correct solutions. There was a statistically significant (p < 0.05) increase in correct solutions in the IVE. The results suggest that an IVE allows for faster and more accurate problem solving in a complex interactive three-dimensional domain. iv
Content may be subject to copyright.
A preview of the PDF is not available
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any citations for this publication.
Technical Report
Full-text available
This CAVE User's Guide contains all the information an application developer needs to successfully create a CAVE experience. A description of the CAVE virtual reality system (Chapter 2) A list of the hardware components, particularly those with which a programmer should be concerned (Chapters 3 & 4) A description of the CAVE software library (Chapters 5 & 6) A description of the most used development tool for CAVE applications, the CAVE simulator (Chapter 7) A list of supporting software in the CAVE system directory (Chapter 8) A list of CAVE configuration options (Chapter 9) Sample programs (Chapter 10)
Article
Full-text available
Virtual reality (VR) can be defined as interactive computer graphics that provides viewer-centered perspective, large field of view and stereo. Head-mounted displays (HMDs) and BOOMs™ achieve these features with small display screens which move with the viewer, close to the viewer's eyes. Projection-based displays [3, 7], supply these characteristics by placing large, fixed screens more distant from the viewer. The Electronic Visualization Laboratory (EVL) of the University of Illinois at Chicago has specialized in projection-based VR systems. EVL's projection-based VR display, the CAVE™ [2], premiered at the SIGGRAPH 92 conference.In this article we present two new, CAVE-derived, projection-based VR displays developed at EVL: the ImmersaDesk™ and the Infinity Wall™, a VR version of the PowerWall [9]. We describe the different requirements which led to their design, and compare these systems to other VR devices.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper describes tools and techniques for the exploration of gee-scientific data from the oil and gas domain in stereoscopic virtual environments. The two main sources of data in the exploration task are seismic volumes and multivariate well logs of physical properties down a bore hole. We have developed a props-based interaction device called the cubic mouse to allow more direct and intuitive interaction with a cubic seismic volume. This device effectively places the seismic cube in the user's hand. Geologists who have tried this device have been enthusiastic about the ease of use, and were adept only a few moments after picking it up. We have also developed a multi-modal, visualisation and sonification technique for the dense, multivariate well log data. The visualisation can show two well log variables mapped along the well geometry in a bivariate colour scheme, and another variable on a sliding lens. A sonification probe is attached to the lens so that other variables can be heard. The sonification is based on a Geiger-counter metaphor that is widely understood and which makes it easy to explain. The data is sonified at higher or lower resolutions depending on the speed of the lens. Sweeps can be made at slower rates and over smaller intervals to home in on peaks, boundaries or other features in the full resolution data set.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We have created an immersive application for statistical graphics and have investigated what benefits it offers over more traditional data analysis tools. We present a description of both the traditional data analysis tools and our virtual environment, and results of an experiment designed to determine if an immersive environment based on the XGobi desktop system provides advantages over XGobi for analysis of high-dimensional statistical data. The experiment included two aspects of each environment: three structure detection (visualization) tasks and one ease of interaction task. The subjects were given these tasks in both the C2 virtual environment and a workstation running XGobi. The experiment results showed an improvement in participants' ability to perform structure detection tasks in the C2 to their performance in the desktop environment. However, participants were more comfortable with the interaction tools in the desktop system
Conference Paper
This paper is a preliminary report on a set of experiments designed to compare an immersive, head-tracked VR system to a typical graphics workstation display screen, with respect to whether VR makes it easier for a user to comprehend complex, 3-D objects. Experimental subjects were asked to build a physical replica of a three-dimensional “wire sculpture” which they viewed either physically, on a workstation screen, or in a stereoscopic “boom” VR display. Preliminary results show less speed but slightly fewer errors with the VR display. The slower speed is probably explainable by the overhead involved in moving to and grasping the boom display.
Book
This book provides a non-technical introduction to the subject of oil. The author guides the readers in logical sequence: How oil and gas form and accumulate; how to explore for oil; and how to drill and complete a well and produce the petroleum. The contents are: The earth's crust; identification of common rocks and minerals; weathering, erosion, and unconformities; deformation; geologic time; sandstone reservoirs; limestone reservoirs; subsurface fluids; sedimentary rock patterns; surface and subsurface maps; ocean environment - plate tectonics; hydrocarbons source rocks, generation, migration and accumulation; well logs, traps; petroleum exploration; drilling a well; completing a well; and petroleum production.
Article
An important and troublesome problem with current virtual environment (VE) technology is the tendency for some users to exhibit symptoms that parallel symptoms of classical motion sickness both during and after the VE experience. This type of sickness, cybersickness, is distinct from motion sickness in that the user is often stationary but has a compelling sense of self motion through moving visual imagery. Unfortunately, there are many factors that can cause cybersickness and there is no foolproof method for eliminating the problem. In this paper, I discuss a number of the primary factors that contribute to the cause of cybersickness, describe three conflicting cybersickness theories that have been postulated, and discuss some possible methods for reducing cybersickness in VEs.
Article
Simulator sickness (SS) in high-fidelity visual simulators is a byproduct of modem simulation technology. Although it involves symptoms similar to those of motion-induced sickness (MS), SS tends to be less severe, to be of lower incidence, and to originate from elements of visual display and visuo-vestibular interaction atypical of conditions that induce MS. Most studies of SS to date index severity with some variant of the Pensacola Motion Sickness Questionnaire (MSQ). The MSQ has several deficiencies as an instrument for measuring SS. Some symptoms included in the scoring of MS are irrelevant for SS, and several are misleading. Also, the configural approach of the MSQ is not readily adaptable to computer administration and scoring. This article describes the development of a Simulator Sickness Questiomaire (SSQ), derived from the MSQ using a series of factor analyses, and illustrates its use in monitoring simulator performance with data from a computerized SSQ survey of 3,691 simulator hops. The database used for development included more than 1,100 MSQs, representing data from 10 Navy simulators. The SSQ provides straightforward computer or manual scoring, increased power to identify "problem" simulators, and improved diagnostic capability.
Conference Paper
Head-coupled virtual reality systems can cause symptoms of sickness (cybersickness). A study has been conducted to investigate the effects of scene oscillations on the level and types of cybersickness. Sixteen male subjects participated in the experiments. They were exposed to four 20-minute virtual simulation sessions, in a balanced order with 10 days separation. The 4 simulation sessions exposed the subjects to similar visual scene oscillation in different axis: pitch axis, yaw axis, roll axis and no oscillation (speed: 30°/s, range: +/-60°). Verbal ratings of nausea level were taken at 5-minute intervals and sickness symptoms were measured before and after the exposure using the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire (SSQ). Significant differences were found between the no oscillation condition and the oscillating conditions. With scene oscillation, nausea ratings increased significantly after 5-minute exposure for all the oscillation axes (pitch, yaw, and roll axes). Total sickness scores were obtained from the SSQ and their profiles with different scene oscillation axes were presented