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International Journal of Scientific Research and Reviews Standardization and Validation of Hindi Version of Kansas Marital Satisfaction Scale

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Abstract

The present study aimed to elucidate the psychometric properties, factorial structure, and predictive validity of Hindi version of Kansas Marital Satisfaction Scale in Indian cultural milieu. A total of 300 couples, 21 to 75 years old (300 husbands and 300 wives) were, conveniently sampled from Chowk and adjoining areas of Varanasi city of Uttar Pradesh, completed the Hindi version of Kansas Marital Satisfaction Scale. Factor analysis (principal components) with loadings equal to or more than 0.400, Eigen value equal to 1.00 and the Scree plot revealed single factors explaining a total of 81.116 % variance for husbands, 77.129 % variance for wives and 78.992 % variance for couples (husbands and wives). Confirmatory factor revealed that the fit indices were very good (χ2 = 0.00, p < 0.001; CFI = 1.00; GFI = 1.00; SRMR = 0.00; RMR = 0.00) over the level of analysis (for husbands, wives and whole sample). The reliability coefficients of the single factor emerged fairly high and indicated good reliability of the Hindi version of KMSS. KMSS correlated significantly and positively with all measures of DASH indicating good convergent validity of KMSS-H. The results also indicated no significant gender and age differences on marital satisfaction as measured by KMSS-H. The findings indicated that Kansas Marital satisfaction Scale-Hindi (KMSS-H) may function as a useful brief measure of marital satisfaction in Indian culture.

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