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FACEBOOK USAGE IN POLITICAL COMMUNICATION IN GHANA: THE CASE OF TWO POLITICAL PARTIES AKWASI BOSOMPEM BOATENG A THESIS SUBMITTED IN FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENT FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY (PHD) IN THE CENTRE FOR COMMUNICATION, MEDIA AND SOCIETY IN THE SCHOOL OF APPLIED

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  • North-West University South Africa
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Abstract

Doctoral thesis submitted to the University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

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