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Saunf: Do we really need fennel seeds after a meal?

Authors:
  • Military hospital devlali

Abstract

It is customary in India to offer fennel seeds after a meal. Eating saunf after meals is considered a healthy practice, primarily because of its ability to keep the digestive system healthy. Foeniculum vulgare Mill commonly called fennel has been used in traditional medicine for a wide range of ailments related to digestive, endocrine, reproductive, and respiratory systems and has presence of numerous valuable compounds, such as flavonoids, phenolic compounds, fatty acids, and amino acids. It is also used as a galactagogue agent for lactating mothers and remains to be the most widely used herbal plant used for treatment of more than forty types of disorders. Fennel maybe consumed daily, in the raw form as salads and snacks, stewed, boiled, grilled, or baked in several dishes and even used in the preparation of herbal teas or spirits. Consumption of fennel seeds lead to increase in breast size and are extensively used as galactagogues for improving the milk flow of breastfeeding mothers. Sugar coated and uncoated fennel seeds are used in Mouth freshener. Fennel tea may aid healthy digestion and is used for various digestive problems including heartburn, bloating, loss of appetite, and colic in infants. It has anxiolytic action and is used as an anti-stress agent and is believed to enhance memory and intelligence. Fennel seeds may be used in treating bronchial and bronchopulmonary afflictions and have an anti-spasmodic action and chewing the seeds can help to relieve hunger pangs. It possesses significant oculohypotensive activity and has been proved to be effective in reducing the severity of dysmenorrhea. Saunf has powerful anti-aging properties that protects our skin from premature wrinkles and lines and is effective in treatment of moderate hirsutism.
5
Page 5-8 © MAT Journals. All Rights Reserved
Journal of Medical Surgical Nursing Practice and Research
e-ISSN: 2582-1512
Volume 2, Issue 1
Saunf: Do we really need fennel seeds after a
meal?
Gurmeet Singh Sarla*
Senior Registrar, 159 General Hospital, India
INFO
*Corresponding Author:
E-mail Id: rijak1@gmail.com
DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.3415288
Cite as: Gurmeet Singh Sarla. (2019).
Saunf: Do we really need fennel seeds
after a meal?. Journal of Medical
Surgical Nursing Practice and
Research (e-issn: 2582-1512), 2(1),
58.
http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3415288
ABSTRACT
It is customary in India to offer fennel seeds after a
meal. Eating saunf after meals is considered a healthy
practice, primarily because of its ability to keep the
digestive system healthy. Foeniculum vulgare Mill
commonly called fennel has been used in traditional
medicine for a wide range of ailments related to
digestive, endocrine, reproductive, and respiratory
systems and has presence of numerous valuable
compounds, such as flavonoids, phenolic compounds,
fatty acids, and amino acids. It is also used as a
galactagogue agent for lactating mothers and remains
to be the most widely used herbal plant used for
treatment of more than forty types of disorders. Fennel
maybe consumed daily, in the raw form as salads and
snacks, stewed, boiled, grilled, or baked in several
dishes and even used in the preparation of herbal teas
or spirits. Consumption of fennel seeds lead
to increase in breast size and are extensively used as
galactagogues for improving the milk flow of
breastfeeding mothers. Sugar coated and uncoated
fennel seeds are used in Mouth freshener. Fennel tea
may aid healthy digestion and is used for various
digestive problems including heartburn, bloating, loss
of appetite, and colic in infants. It has anxiolytic action
and is used as an anti-stress agent and is believed to
enhance memory and intelligence. Fennel seeds may
be used in treating bronchial and bronchopulmonary
afflictions and have an anti-spasmodic action and
chewing the seeds can help to relieve hunger pangs. It
possesses significant oculohypotensive activity and has
been proved to be effective in reducing the severity of
dysmenorrhea. Saunf has powerful anti-aging
properties that protects our skin from premature
wrinkles and lines and is effective in treatment of
moderate hirsutism.
Keywords: Fennel, foeniculum vulgare mill, saunf
7
Page 5-8 © MAT Journals. All Rights Reserved
Journal of Medical Surgical Nursing Practice and Research
e-ISSN: 2582-1512
Volume 2, Issue 1
INTRODUCTION
It is customary in India to offer fennel
seeds after a meal. Eating saunf after
meals is considered a healthy practice,
primarily because of its ability to keep the
digestive system healthy. Fennel seed tea
can help with digestion woes. Foeniculum
vulgare Mill commonly called fennel has
been used in traditional medicine for a
wide range of ailments related to digestive,
endocrine, reproductive, and respiratory
systems and has presence of numerous
valuable compounds, such as flavonoids,
phenolic compounds, fatty acids, and
amino acids. It is also used as a
galactagogue agent for lactating mothers.
Foeniculum vulgare remains to be the
most widely used herbal plant and has
been used for treatment of more than forty
types of disorders.
Preparations: Fennel maybe consumed
daily, in the raw form as salads and
snacks, stewed, boiled, grilled, or baked in
several dishes and even used in the
preparation of herbal teas or spirits. Fennel
is used in various traditional systems of
medicine like in the Ayurveda, Unani,
Siddha, in the Indian, and Iranian
traditional systems of alternative and
balancing medicine [1].
Health Benefits
Breast
Fennel seeds are typically known to
naturally increase the amount of fluids
inside the breast tissue. They not only add
firmness to breasts, but also lead
to increase in breast size. F. vulgare, are
extensively used as galactagogues for
improving the milk flow of breastfeeding
mothers [2].
Mouth Freshener
Fennel seeds have been used as an
ingredient for removing any foul smell of
the mouth [3]. Sugar coated and uncoated
fennel seeds are used in Mouth freshener.
Tea
Fennel tea has long been enjoyed for its
flavour, though many choose to drink it for
its purported health benefits. Fennel tea
may aid healthy digestion. It is native to
the Mediterranean, but is now found
throughout the world.
Spice
Dried fennel seeds are often used in
cooking as an anise-flavored
spice. Fennel is used for various digestive
problems including heartburn, bloating,
loss of appetite, and colic in infants.
Effects on Nervous system: Anxiety is the
unpleasant feeling of fear and concern.
Fennel is a drug used for the treatment of
anxiety. Naga Kishore et al studied the
anxiolytic activity of ethanolic extract
of F. vulgare [4]. Drugs and food of
natural origin play a significant role in
public healthcare systems and are being
investigated as remedies for a number of
stress-related disorders and it has been
found that the extract of plant of F.
vulgare acts as an anti-stress agent
[5]. There are a number of plants, whose
consumption is believed to enhance
memory and intelligence. F. vulgaris is an
ayurvedic mixture possessing multiple
neuropharmacological activities and it has
been found out that F. vulgare extract
possesses memory-enhancing properties
[5]. F. vulgare has been employed in
treatment of cognitive disorders such as
dementia and Alzheimer's disease as a
nootropic and anticholinesterase agent [6].
Expectorant Action
F. vulgare seeds stimulate the ciliary
motility of the respiratory apparatus and
are used in treating bronchial and
bronchopulmonary afflictions and in
particularly polluted environments [7]. The
volatile oil of F. vulgare stimulates the
contraction of the smooth muscles of the
trachea, an action that could facilitate the
expectoration of mucus, bacteria, and other
corpuscles extraneous to the respiratory
tracts [8].
8
Page 5-8 © MAT Journals. All Rights Reserved
Journal of Medical Surgical Nursing Practice and Research
e-ISSN: 2582-1512
Volume 2, Issue 1
Weight Loss
Fennel seeds are responsible for kick-
starting your metabolism. Bae et al.
showed that intake of fennel seeds could
suppress appetite attributing to the content
of trans-anethole, which acted on
amphetamine and helped appetite control
[9]. Fennel is an anti-spasmodic and
chewing the seeds can help to relieve
hunger pangs.
Eye Sight
Fennel seeds help to improve eyesight,
alleviate high eye pressure, dry eyes, tired,
watery eyes and almost all eye related
problems. This proves promising
benefits of fennel seeds as an anti-
glaucoma medication. The aqueous extract
of Foeniculum vulgare possesses
significant oculohypotensive activity,
which was found to be comparable to that
of timolol used for treatment of glaucoma
[10].
Anti-inflammatory Effects
Fennel can help relax the muscles in the
body and contains nutrients that are anti-
inflammatory, antioxidants, and
antispasmodic. Fennel increased red and
white blood cells probably due to the
presence of polyphenols and antioxidant
activity of fennel and reduced negative
effects of free radicals on blood cells [11].
Fennel has been proved to be effective in
reducing the severity of dysmenorrhea
probably because it contains an
antispasmodic and anethol agents which
may be helpful for management of primary
dysmenorrhea [12].
Skin: According to sources at
Livestrong, fennel protects against free
radicals and is equipped with nutrients to
prevent cell damage.
Applying fennel seeds topically will give
your skin a direct source of iron, copper,
potassium, and zinc so you can fight your
aging and complexion needs. The
antioxidant properties of fennel fights off
the free radicals that rob oxygen from the
healthy skin cells and damage the
cells. Saunf has powerful anti-aging
properties that protects our skin from
premature wrinkles and lines. Rasul et al
developed a base and formulation
containing 4% concentrated seed extract
of F. vulgare which showed significant
anti-aging effect related to skin moisture
and transepidermal water loss [13].
Hair: Idiopathic hirsutism is defined as the
growth of androgen-sensitive hair in areas
where these are naturally absent. A study
revealed that fennel gel 3% is effective in
decreasing hair thickness in women with
idiopathic mild to moderate hirsutism [14].
CONCLUSION
Fennel has been used in traditional
medicine for a wide range of ailments
related to digestive, endocrine,
reproductive, and respiratory systems.
Consumption of fennel seeds lead
to increase in breast size and are
extensively used as galactagogues for
improving the milk flow of breastfeeding
mothers. Sugar coated and uncoated fennel
seeds are used in mouth freshener. Fennel
tea may aid healthy digestion and is used
for various digestive problems including
heartburn, bloating, loss of appetite, and
colic in infants. It has anxiolytic action and
is used as an anti-stress agent and is
believed to enhance memory and
intelligence. Fennel seeds may be used in
treating bronchial and broncho-pulmonary
afflictions and have an anti-spasmodic
action and chewing the seeds can help to
relieve hunger pangs. It possesses
significant oculo-hypotensive activity and
has been proved to be effective in reducing
the severity of dysmenorrhea. Saunf has
powerful anti-aging properties that
protects our skin from premature wrinkles
and lines and is effective in treatment of
moderate hirsutism.
REFERENCES
1. Rahimi R, Ardekani MRS (2013),
Medicinal properties of Foeniculum
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Page 5-8 © MAT Journals. All Rights Reserved
Journal of Medical Surgical Nursing Practice and Research
e-ISSN: 2582-1512
Volume 2, Issue 1
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Chinese Journal of Integrative
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2. Guarrera PM, Savo V (2013),
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3. Kirtikar KR, Basu BD, Indian
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4. Naga Kishore R, Anjaneyulu N, Naga
Ganesh M, Sravya N (2012),
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ethanolic extract of Foeniculum
vulgare in mice model”, International
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5. Koppula S, Kumar H (2013),
Foeniculum vulgare Mill
(Umbelliferae) attenuates stress and
improves memory in wister rats”,
Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical
Research, Volume 12, Issue 4, pp.
553558.
6. Joshi H, Parle M (2006), Cholinergic
basis of memory-strengthening effect
of Foeniculum vulgare Linn”, Journal
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7. Mueller-Limmroth W, Froehlich HH
(1980), Effect of various
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9. Bae J, Kim J, Choue R, Lim H (2015),
Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) and
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10. Agarwal R, Gupta SK, Agrawal SS,
Srivastava S, Saxena R (Jan-Mar
2008), Oculohypotensive effects of
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7783.
11. Mansouri E, Kooti W, Bazvand M et
al. (2015), The Effect of Hydro-
Alcoholic Extract of Foeniculum
vulgare Mill on Leukocytes and
Hematological Tests in Male
Rats”, Jundishapur J Nat Pharm
Prod., Volume 10, Issue 1, pp. e18396.
12. Bokaie M, Farajkhoda T, Enjezab B,
Khoshbin A, Karimi-Zarchi M (Mar
2014), Oral fennel (Foeniculum
vulgare) drop effect on primary
dysmenorrhea: Effectiveness of herbal
drug published correction appears in
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13. Zarchi Mojgan, Karimi (2013), Iran J
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14. Rasul A, Akhtar N, Khan BA,
Mahmood T, Uz Zaman S, Shoaib
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(2014), The effect of fennel
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Medicinal properties of Foeniculum
  • R Rahimi
  • Mrs Ardekani
Rahimi R, Ardekani MRS (2013), "Medicinal properties of Foeniculum
  • Zarchi Mojgan
  • Karimi
Zarchi Mojgan, Karimi (2013), Iran J Nurs Midwifery Res., Volume 18, Issue 2, pp. 128-132.