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Abstract

Sinds 2011 heeft Hogeschool Rotterdam een eigen fablab wat gespecialiseerd is in meten, weten en doen. Het lab fungeert vooral als een leer- en lesomgeving voor keuzevakken en minoren, maar dient daarnaast ook als een infrastructuur voor studenten voor het maken van prototypes. Voor ons is het lab, oorspronkelijk een onbedoelde bijvangst, vooral ook een faciliteit waarbinnen we kunnen experimenteren met onderwijs. We ontwikkelden onze leeractiviteiten aanvankelijk binnen de setting van een formele onderwijsinstelling - hoewel we met name informele leerervaringen boden. Bij het ontwikkelen, inzetten en herontwikkelen van deze activiteiten zijn we ons handelen blijven bestuderen en overdenken. In dit boekje willen we ons concentreren op een aantal didactische principes die we nuttig vonden voor het begeleiden van de co-creatie van kennis in ons lab.
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Book
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Since 2011, the Rotterdam University of Applied Sciences has been operating its ‘own’ fab lab specialising in sensor technology, (open) data and digital fabrication. The lab has served primarily as an infrastructure for various educational activities, and as a makerspace for students from a broad range of education programmes. The lab also serves as an incubator for developing teaching methodologies in maker education. Besides specifically lab-related educational activities, the lab has also played an important role in introducing maker education within the University’s educational practices. Finally, the lab has served as a resource for primary and secondary schools interested in learning about and developing their own approach to maker education. During the past seven years, the knowledge developed has been shared mainly among the people working in and for the lab. This publication collects the experience of these seven years of developing and learning about maker education, which until now has only been sporadically documented. The publication is also intended as a contribution to the ongoing discussion about the future of maker education and ‘fab learning’. The key lessons from these seven years of operating a fab lab at the Rotterdam University of Applied Sciences are primarily reflected in the design and redesign of courses, particularly those related to the lab. Current challenges include rejuvenating the lab approach, transferring its success to new (and future) labs and to more general educational practices, and addressing issues of sustainability, transition and ethics. * * * Sinds 2011 heeft Hogeschool Rotterdam een ‘eigen’ fablab, gespecialiseerd in sensortechnologie, (open) data en digitaal prototypen. Het lab fungeert in de eerste plaats als infrastructuur voor diverse onderwijsvormen en als makerspace voor studenten uit een breed scala aan opleidingen. Het lab fungeert ook als broedplaats voor het ontwikkelen van pedagogische methodieken in en voor het maakonderwijs. Naast lab-specifieke onderwijsvormen heeft het lab ook een belangrijke rol gespeeld bij het introduceren van maakonderwijs in de onderwijspraktijk binnen de hogeschool. Ten slotte heeft het lab ook gediend als hulpbron voor lagere en middelbare scholen die geïnteresseerd zijn in het ontwikkelen van hun eigen benadering van maakonderwijs. De afgelopen zeven jaar is de kennis die in het lab is ontwikkeld, voornamelijk gedeeld tussen de mensen die in en voor het lab hebben gewerkt. Deze publicatie biedt een terugblik op de tot nu toe slechts sporadisch gedocumenteerde ervaring van deze zeven jaren van ontwikkelen en leren met betrekking tot maakonderwijs. Deze publicatie is ook bedoeld als bijdrage aan de doorlopende discussie over wat maakonderwijs en fab learning in de komende jaren zou kunnen zijn of worden. De belangrijkste lessen uit zeven jaar fablab aan Hogeschool Rotterdam zijn met name terug te vinden in het ontwerp en herontwerp van cursussen, met name de cursussen die betrekking hebben op het lab. Op dit moment zijn onze belangrijkste uitdagingen: het vernieuwen van de opzet van het lab, het overbrengen van onze successen naar nieuwe (en toekomstige) labs en naar andere onderwijspraktijken, en een bewustwording van de problematieken van duurzaamheid, transitie en ethiek.
Conference Paper
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Since 2011, Hogeschool Rotterdam (Rotterdam University of Applied Sciences) operates a FabLab specialized in sensing, data processing and digital fabrication. The lab acted primarily as an educational infrastructure for electives and course modules within minors, and it was a making infrastructure for students from a broad range of disciplines. The lab also served as a breeding ground for pedagogic approaches in maker education. Its impact went beyond the lab-related courses and had a rather substantial impact on introducing maker education into educational practice within the University. The lab equally was a starting point for primary and secondary schools to learn about and begin to develop their own maker education approaches. Many experiences were mainly shared between the people working at and for the lab. This paper brings together the scarcely and scatteredly documented experience of the seven years working on and learning about maker education through the lab. It aims to contribute to the discussion about what maker education and “fab learning” might develop into in the years to come. Key learnings from seven years of FabLab at Hogeschool Rotterdam are primarily reflected in the design and redesign of the courses related to the lab and elsewhere in the University. Current challenges include rejuvenating the lab approach, transferring its success to new labs being established and to more general educational practices, and addressing issues of sustainability, transition and ethics.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This demo proposal builds upon recent research in the Netherlands were we try to gain insights into teachers acting as designers. A few years ago, we started professional learning groups around design and research with teachers in secondary education [8]. In a few sessions these teachers morphed into designers of (maker) education and so, they were able to (re)design maker education within and outside the lab. Not all teachers experience this 'freedom' to redesign education and most of them seem to have trouble with designing for courses around for example maker education. We developed a booklet with several exercises for teachers to gain more insights into their habits around design, specifically regarding making mistakes and celebrating successes. At Fablearn we would like to demo some exercises teachers (and designers) can directly interact with. Next to that, we would like to hand-out some booklets (instruments) to teachers to stimulate (and let them find) their inner designer.
Book
Our world has changed a great deal since we first (or last) designed education. The current educational setting – a bunch of students in a classroom, at a set time and place, with one teacher sharing their knowledge as an omniscient authority – is still very much the same as it was a century ago. In the Netherlands, the educational landscape provides, at least in theory, a great deal of freedom for schools to transform the contemporary learning environment as well as our vision of learning. However, many teachers struggle to experience or professionally make good use of this freedom. There seems to be a mismatch between the possibilities for change, and how these possibilities are actually being used. Manon Mostert believes that education will benefit from a design approach toward educational processes, developed by teachers and encouraged by school administrators. Once teachers start to (iteratively) design the process of learning, the education system will change accordingly. Such a design approach makes it possible to transform education on a small scale but with a big impact. Let's do away with the big-bang, top-down implementations. We, teachers, have the power to change education at its core. Therefore: Hey teacher, find your inner designer! This handbook combines a study of the value for educational processes of the various mistakes which teachers make, with small challenges for encouraging teachers to discover their inner designer. The book also includes a number of case stories of teachers who dare to fail.
Article
I introduce in this paper a new learning and making process that fosters a new ability to make things through the body's direct, iterative engagement with materials, tools, machines and objects. Tested in a variety of educational settings, this method, which I call 'I3' for its three-layer operation of 'Imitation, Iteration and Improvisation', allows learners to develop their sensory experiences to improvise and create on their own. I introduce case studies in order to test I3. I challenge the separation of design and construction often reinforced by the use of digital fabrication. I show that learning to make and learning from making emerge together through a situated and embodied interaction among the learner, the materials, the tools and the object in-the-making.