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Framework development for 'just transition' in coal producing jurisdictions

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  • Eastern and Midland Regional Assembly (EMRA)
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Framework development for 'just transition' in coal producing jurisdictions

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The rhetoric of the 'just transition' lies at the heart of energy and development policies internationally. In this context, it is crucial that communities dependent on fossil fuel extraction and production for employment do not become 'victims' of the decarbonisation process. This paper involves a theoretically and conceptually grounded comparative analysis of policy measures that have been introduced in three first world jurisdictions which have been dependent on coal for employment-North Rhine-Westphalia in Germany, Alberta in Canada and Victoria in Australia. In so doing, measures which have successfully ameliorated the socioeconomic well-being of coal dependent communities are identified and a framework for successful just transition is proposed. Recognising, but notwithstanding, inherent power dynamics, the framework identifies an important role for government in assisting workers and communities in navigating the transition process and in supporting new and emerging low-carbon industries in the context of 'strong' sustainable development.
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... This paper aims to fill the literature gap by presenting a broader, literature review-based assessment of just transitions of the three technological routes towards climate neutrality in the steel industry. With some exceptions [46], most studies on just transitions focus on coal mining [47][48][49][50] rather than on fossil fuel-using sectors. To date, the only study looking into the societal impact and just transitions in specifically the steel industry, focusses on labour-related just transitions aspects [50]. ...
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