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NWFP implications in a bioeconomy: Resource and management – Novel management concepts to boost product diversity and secure higher product flows

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Abstract

NWFPs show a variety of connections to the concept of smart, inclusive development in a bioeconomy. However, there is no substantial body of evidence that comprehensively considers NWFPs in the context of a bioeconomy. Based on the knowledge collected in this report, this chapter describes a few examples of the contribution of NWFPs as a basis for more in-depth perception of NWFPs as a central natural resource of European forests. This chapter: (i) briefly summarizes some principle linkages of NWFPs that bear opportunities in a cross-sectoral bioeconomy; and (ii) highlights the importance of modern, adapted management concepts.

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... Ex Pers.) Pilát), stone pine (Pinus pinea L.) grafted for Mediterranean pine nuts [25] and American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius L.) cultivated under shade structures since the mid-1800s [26]. The promotion and utilisation of NWFP commodities supports the concept of a future based on the utilisation of sustainably sourced natural resources as a foundation of a bio-based economy replacing the current modern fossil-based economy (cf. ...
... Integration of NWFP into sustainable co-production management for wood and non-wood requires several major considerations [85,86,104,105,123] and may demand an element of silvicultural innovation [25,117]. Compatible management, defined as the concurrent production of multiple products without significant decrease in other values (cf. ...
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Analysis of innovation related policies on European and national levels relevant for NWFP
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Ludvig, A., Živojinovic, I. and Weiss, G. 2014. Analysis of innovation related policies on European and national levels relevant for NWFP. StarTree Deliverable 5.3. FP7 Project no. 311919
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NTFPs policy access to markets and labour issues in Finland: impacts of regionalisation and globalisation on the wild berry industry
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Richards, R.T. and Saastamoinen, O. 2010. NTFPs policy access to markets and labour issues in Finland: impacts of regionalisation and globalisation on the wild berry industry. In: Laird, S.A., Wynberg, R.P., McLain, R.J. (Eds.), Wild Product Governance. Finding Policies That Work for Non-Timber Forest Products. Earthscan, pp. 287-307.
Key messages • Besides the traditional synergies with agriculture and food industries, bolstering the NWFP economy requires coordination of policy issues as varied as production of raw materials; health and well-being
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Vidale, E., Dare, R. and Pettenella, D. 2014. Global trade in NWFP and position of EU. In: Wong, J., Prokofieva, I. (eds). The State of the European NWFP. StarTree report D1.3. Pp. 9-21. http:// star-tree.eu/images/deliverables/WP1/D1_3_SOSR_nov2015.pdf Key messages • Besides the traditional synergies with agriculture and food industries, bolstering the NWFP economy requires coordination of policy issues as varied as production of raw materials; health and well-being; art and tourism; nature protection; labour, and trade.
Rural development and SME: the bridge between natural capital and NWFP economy
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Da Re, R., Vidale, E., Corradini, G. and Pettenella, D. 2016. Rural development and SME: the bridge between natural capital and NWFP economy. Deliverable D3.4 of the "StarTree" project, FP7 Project no. 311919 KBBE.2012.1.2-06.
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Pettenella, D., Vidale, E., Da Re, R. and Lovrić, M. 2014. NWFP in the international market: current situation and trends. StarTree Deliverable 3.1. FP7 Project no. 311919 KBBE.2012.1.2-06.
A Guide to Environmental Labels -for Procurement Practitioners of the United Nations System
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Forest Legislation in Europe: How 23 countries approach the obligation to reforest, public access and use of non-wood forest products
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Bauer, J., Kniivilä, M. and Schmithüsen, F. 2004. Forest Legislation in Europe: How 23 countries approach the obligation to reforest, public access and use of non-wood forest products. Geneva: UNECE/FAO Timber Branch.
Key messages • The issue of NWFPs should systematically be made visible in policy documents, information/statistics, budget lines, education and training, research, development and innovation
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Pine, B. J., Gilmore, J. H. (1999). Experience economy: Work is theater and every business a stage. Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press. Key messages • The issue of NWFPs should systematically be made visible in policy documents, information/statistics, budget lines, education and training, research, development and innovation, as well as in all relevant political communication activities.