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CNN-Based Semantic Change Detection in Satellite Imagery

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Abstract

Timely disaster risk management requires accurate road maps and prompt damage assessment. Currently, this is done by volunteers manually marking satellite imagery of affected areas but this process is slow and often error-prone. Segmentation algorithms can be applied to satellite images to detect road networks. However, existing methods are unsuitable for disaster-struck areas as they make assumptions about the road network topology which may no longer be valid in these scenarios. Herein, we propose a CNN-based framework for identifying accessible roads in post-disaster imagery by detecting changes from pre-disaster imagery. Graph theory is combined with the CNN output for detecting semantic changes in road networks with OpenStreetMap data. Our results are validated with data of a tsunami-affected region in Palu, Indonesia acquired from DigitalGlobe.

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SpaceNet: a remote sensing dataset and challenge series
  • A Van Etten
  • D Lindenbaum
  • T M Bacastow