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Вплив транспортної інфраструктури на біорізноманіття: практичний посібник для країн Карпатського регіону

Authors:
  • State Museum of Natural History, National Academy of Sciences, Lviv, Ukraine
  • Institute of Ecology of the Carpathians, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lviv, Ukraine

Abstract

Публікація присвячена оцінці впливу транспортної інфраструктури на біорізноманіття. Представлені дані спрямовані на вироблення управлінських рішень щодо зменшення негативного впливу транспортної інфраструктури на природу Карпат. У посібнику представлено аналіз сучасного стану справ розвитку транспортної інфраструктури, безпечної для довкілля в різних країнах Карпатського екорегіону, каталог заходів, які мають вирішальне значення для міграції тварин, огляд зацікавлених сторін, які впливають на процес розвитку інфраструктури, а також рекомендації щодо сталого розвитку транспорту та оцінки впливу транспорту на довкілля. Посібник можна використовувати на всіх рівнях сталого розвитку транспортної інфраструктури: від початкового планування і проектування до будівництва, експлуатації та технічного обслуговування. Посібник призначений для експертів та працівників транспортної галузі та охорони природи, а також для біологів, екологів, студентів відповідних спеціальностей, фахівців із питань оцінки впливу на довкілля, працівників державних органів та активістів громадського сектору.
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