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Data literacy from theory to reality: How does it look?

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  • Civic Software Foundation

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Data has been around for centuries however only recently has it been discussed outside of the IT-sphere as its role and significance is ever-increasing in every area from governance to education by the virtue of digitalization. This intravenous digitalization consequently transfigured data as well as bestowed new aspects to traditional words. Among those words, literacy is arguably one of the most significant ones. It is conventionally identified with empowerment and freedom coming from letters, however in the digital age literacy put together with data, creating a new term: Data Literacy which signifies the empowerment by/coming from data. Data literacy is (still) a blurry anthology although it was coined about twenty years ago. The phenomenon has been discussed ever since, both in theory and in practice, by scholars, experts and initiatives coming from various disciplines. Soon after, discussions were followed by dissent regarding the aim of data literacy, skills and competencies that are needed to become data literate, who should become data literate, whether everyone needs to actually become data literate and many more issues like this. Such disputations inspired the main aim of this thesis: Comparing data literacy in theory to data literacy in practice and mapping out the matching as well as contradicting points within and between areas, as well as looking at the reasonings of such points. The aim of this study is to sketch a holistic picture of both sides of data literacy and bring a new dimension to the discussion.
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... Algunos autores que defienden que Data Literacy no solo es un componente más de otras alfabetizaciones como la digital y la informacional, sino que también lo es de la estadística (Guler, 2019), e incluye, al mismo tiempo, otras sub-alfabetizaciones como data management literacy, critical data literacy, research data literacy, creative data literacy, science data literacy, data information literacy, pedagogical data literacy, healthcare data literacy y administrative data literacy (Guler, 2019). ...
... Algunos autores que defienden que Data Literacy no solo es un componente más de otras alfabetizaciones como la digital y la informacional, sino que también lo es de la estadística (Guler, 2019), e incluye, al mismo tiempo, otras sub-alfabetizaciones como data management literacy, critical data literacy, research data literacy, creative data literacy, science data literacy, data information literacy, pedagogical data literacy, healthcare data literacy y administrative data literacy (Guler, 2019). ...
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