Conference Paper

Making Sense of Human-Food Interaction

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Abstract

Activity in Human-Food Interaction (HFI) research is sky-rocketing across a broad range of disciplinary interests and concerns. The dynamic and heterogeneous nature of this emerging field presents a challenge to scholars wishing to critically engage with prior work, identify gaps and ensure impact. It also challenges the formation of community. We present a Systematic Mapping Study of HFI research and an online data visualisation tool developed to respond to these issues. The tool allows researchers to engage in new ways with the HFI literature, propose modifications and additions to the review, and thereby actively engage in community-making. Our contribution is threefold: (1) we characterize the state of HFI, reporting trends, challenges and opportunities; (2) we provide a taxonomy and tool for diffractive reading of the literature; and (3) we offer our approach for adaptation by research fields facing similar challenges, positing value of the tool and approach beyond HFI. CCS CONCEPTS • Human-centered computing → HCI theory, concepts and models. * Altarriba Bertran and Wilde are co-first authors.

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... Recent years have seen an increase in digital technologies directed at various aspects of human-food interaction [1]. Mobile applications enabling users to share food and redirect food waste; online platforms for quantified diet personalization; smart kitchenware replacing mundane kitchen tasks and decision-making with AI. ...
... Organizers will also bring boundary food-tech objects, including a dish prepared in the smart oven June 1 contrasted with a homemade fermented pickle jar, personal logs from the food sharing app Share Food 2 , personalized diet plans obtained via the DNA sequencing service Habit 3 , and the algorithmic recipe recommender OpenSauce 4 . We will also use the HFI Lit Review App 5 [1] to diffractively read human-food interaction literature according to issues that arise at the workshop, such as the multiplicity of roles of technology in human life and the balance between automation and individual empowerment. During the hands-on activities, each group documents their prototype through a short hand-drawn / written poster. ...
Conference Paper
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From cooking and growing to shopping and dining, digital technology has become a frequent companion in our everyday food practices. Smart food technologies such as online diet personalization services and AI-based kitchenware offer promises of better data-driven food futures. Yet, human-food automation presents certain risks, both to end consumers and food cultures at large. This one-day workshop aims to question emerging food-tech trends and explore issues through creative food-tech crafting and performative dining activities. We will craft, taste, and debate edible prototypes reflecting on diverse socio-political issues in contemporary food-tech innovation. We posit everyday human-food practices as a relatable context to discuss broader societal issues underlying the growing role of technology and data in commonplace human activities. The workshop aims to gather an interdisciplinary group of researchers and practitioners keen on exploring the diverse roles and potential futures of technology design in everyday life.
... While these technologies already have an impact on social dynamics during food intake [23], other more sophisticated technologies could be envisioned to better integrate into the social structures around food consumption. This is also one of the main interests in Human-Food Interaction (HFI) research, an emerging research area that looks at the intersection of technology, human interaction, and food practices [7]. Works within HFI have the goal of enriching the social dimension of a meal by investigating mealtime technologies, e.g., [5,8,18]. ...
... The results of a preliminary evaluation with 5 participants showed positive outcomes of using this technology. Other works within HFI [7] have the goal of enriching the social dimension of a meal by investigating mealtime technologies, e.g., [8,18]. Though they are not much focused on co-located social interactions, they could inform and inspire our work on designing and implementing ACCs, as they investigate mealtime social interactions and experiences. ...
... In this case, we followed the Situated Play Design (SPD) methodology (Altarriba et al., 2019) Due to a tight time constraint for the event to occur and a pressuring and packed agenda from collaborators, a concept proposal had to be ...
... SPD Using the SPD method for "chasing play" on everyday activities for our design sprint allowed us to base our design decisions on contrasted interactions observed in the field and unfold a solid proposal for our collaborators in that short time. This methodology added value to our design by supporting, rather than disrupting, real-life activities, enriching them through the observed play potentials (Altarriba et al., 2019). ...
Technical Report
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Thesis project report on Design for Play MA. Play Probes for Civic Activism
... Building on the successful development of the first three workshops on Multisensory Approaches to Human-Food Interaction (MHFI, Asia: 18th ICMI Tokyo, November 2016; Europe: 19th ICMI Glasgow, November 2017; North America: 20th ICMI Boulder, October 2018, see Figure 1), we decided to organize its fourth version in 2020, in Utrecht, the Netherlands. There has been an increasing interest in the topic over the last few years [1][2][3], and recent surveys have highlighted these workshops as one of major communities of researchers contributing to develop the area of Human-Food Interaction (HFI, [4]). It is for these reasons that we were happy to continue developing this space, where those researchers interested in studying the multisensory aspects of HFI (from engineering, psychology, food science, marketing, and a number of other fields) can present their ideas and discuss them in an open, constructive, multi-disciplinary environment. ...
Conference Paper
Here, we present the outcome of the 4 th workshop on Multisensory Approaches to Human-Food Interaction (MHFI), developed in collaboration with ICMI 2020 in Utrecht, The Netherlands. Capitalizing on the increasing interest on multisensory aspects of human-food interaction and the unique contribution that our community offers, we developed a space to discuss ideas ranging from mechanisms of multisensory food perception, through multisensory technologies, to new applications of systems in the context of MHFI. All in all, the workshop involved 11 contributions, which will hopefully further help shape the basis of a field of inquiry that grows as we see progress in our understanding of the senses and the development of new technologies in the context of food. CCS CONCEPTS • Human-centered computing, Human computer interaction (HCI), Interaction paradigms
... There are emergent active communities working in this field, including: FoodCHI Special Interest Group (Khot et al., 2017b); SIGCHI foodCHI network 13 ; Facebook FoodCHI group 14 and; an ACM Future of Computing Academy working group on Computing and Food 15 . Besides, Altarriba Bertran et al. (2019) have introduced the "making sense of HFI " dataset that offer a web-based visualisation tool on existing HFI research in HCI. ...
... Human-Food Interaction (HFI) research has been growing steadily in recent years (e.g., Deng et al., 2021). Research into multisensory interactions designed to create, modify, and/or enhance our food-related experiences is one of the core areas of HFI (Multisensory HFI or MHFI, Altarriba Bertran et al., 2019;Velasco and Obrist, 2020). The aim being to further our understanding of the principles that govern the systematic connections between the senses in the context of HFI. ...
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Eating and drinking are undoubtedly amongst life’s most multisensory experiences. Take, for instance, the enjoyment of flavor, which is one of the most important elements of such experiences, resulting from the integration of gustatory, (retronasal) olfactory, and possibly also trigeminal/oral-somatosensory cues (Prescott, 2015). Nevertheless, researchers have suggested that all our senses can influence the way in which we perceive flavor, not to mention our eating and drinking experiences. For instance, the color and shape of the food, the background sonic/noise cues in our eating environments, and/or the sounds associated with mastication can all influence our perception and enjoyment of our eating and drinking experiences (Spence, 2020). Human-Food Interaction (HFI) research has been growing steadily in recent years (e.g., Deng et al., 2021). Research into multisensory interactions designed to create, modify, and/or enhance our food-related experiences is one of the core areas of HFI (Multisensory HFI or MHFI, Altarriba Bertran et al., 2019; Velasco and Obrist, 2020). The aim being to further our understanding of the principles that govern the systematic connections between the senses in the context of HFI. In this Research Topic, we called for investigations and applications of systems that create new, or enhance already existing, multisensory eating and drinking experiences (what can be considered the “hacking” of food experiences) in the context of HFI. Moreover, we were also interested in those works that focus on or are based on the principles governing the systematic connections that exist between the senses. HFI also involves the experiencing of food interactions digitally in remote locations. Therefore, we were also interested in sensing and actuation interfaces, new communication mediums, and persisting and retrieving technologies for human food interactions. Enhancing social interactions to augment the eating experience is another issue we wanted to see addressed here, what has been referred to as “digital commensality” (Spence et al., 2019).
... There is also a rich vein of research in human-computer interaction focused on food, namely, human-food interaction research (e.g. Altarriba Bertran et al. 2019;Choi et al. 2014;Velasco et al. 2018). At one extreme, this starts to intersect with future solutions to helping deliver social dining solutions for those who may need assistance (see ). ...
... In den letzten Jahren hat das Thema Nachhaltigkeit im öffentlichen Diskurs als auch in der HCI-Forschung zunehmend an Bedeutung gewonnen [14]. So zielt das Forschungsfeld des nachhaltigen Interaktionsdesigns [15] darauf ab, einen nachhaltigen Konsum bzw. ...
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Previous attempts of the HCI community to reduce food waste or the carbon footprint, primarily relied on persuasive design. However, these approaches are criticized for not paying enough attention to everyday consumption practices and hence for not being successful in the long term. Therefore, we argue for a broader perspective on studying the role(s) of digital media supporting people in their transition towards more sustainable food consumption. To understand such roles, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 9 vegans. Our findings highlight an intensive use of (digital) media, especially in the early phase of changing consumption practices. Instead of gamification or persuasive design, media triggers initial irritation, provides information to develop a vegan-specific consumption knowledge and connects like-minded people.
... A recent literature review of HFI scholarship (Altarriba, et al., 2019) shows that authors in the field have, to a large extent, embraced techno-centric perspectives and celebratory approaches to food-tech advancement. Except for a handful of critical works (see overview in Altarriba, et al., 2019), the majority of existing HFI research is solution-oriented: HFI projects that propose to fix, speed up, ease, or otherwise make interactions with food more efficient outweigh those reflecting upon the broader, cultural, environmental and political implications of augmenting food practices with technology. Critical works reflecting not only the opportunities but also the potential risks of food-tech innovation are thus largely underrepresented in existing HFI literature. ...
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From smart kitchenware and diet personalization services to digital farming platforms, technology design has become a frequent companion of our day-to-day food practices. Wrapped in techno-optimism, such technologies are often presented as solutions for diverse food problems, including everyday hassles with cooking and shopping as well as systemic issues of malnutrition and unsustainable food production. While food-tech proponents talk about better data-driven food futures, critics highlight the underlying techno-solutionism and negative impacts of food-tech innovation on food systems and cultures. Here, we present the Edible Speculations project that explores food-tech trends and risks through a series of Speculative Design (SD) case studies. Our findings can be of use for designers, researchers, and other practitioners interested in food-tech issues as well as in SD methods.
... Building on the successful development of the first three workshops on Multisensory Approaches to Human-Food Interaction (MHFI, Asia: 18th ICMI Tokyo, November 2016; Europe: 19th ICMI Glasgow, November 2017; North America: 20th ICMI Boulder, October 2018, see Figure 1), we decided to organize its fourth version in 2020, in Utrecht, the Netherlands. There has been an increasing interest in the topic over the last few years [1][2][3], and recent surveys have highlighted these workshops as one of major communities of researchers contributing to develop the area of Human-Food Interaction (HFI, [4]). It is for these reasons that we were happy to continue developing this space, where those researchers interested in studying the multisensory aspects of HFI (from engineering, psychology, food science, marketing, and a number of other fields) can present their ideas and discuss them in an open, constructive, multi-disciplinary environment. ...
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Here, we present the outcome of the 4th workshop on Multisensory Approaches to Human-Food Interaction (MHFI), developed in collaboration with ICMI 2020 in Utrecht, The Netherlands. Capitalizing on the increasing interest on multisensory aspects of human-food interaction and the unique contribution that our community offers, we developed a space to discuss ideas ranging from mechanisms of multisensory food perception, through multisensory technologies, to new applications of systems in the context of MHFI. All in all, the workshop involved 11 contributions, which will hopefully further help shape the basis of a field of inquiry that grows as we see progress in our understanding of the senses and the development of new technologies in the context of food.
... Rituals surrounding the consumption of food [18] and role of food in popular culture [12] have long been the subject of study. In this regard, Altarriba Bertran and colleagues [3] highlighted the need for interventions that explore the social, playful, or cultural aspects of food practices. We address this demand by using food practices as a conversational prop with children to reflect upon the complexity of social norms and cultural traditions that surround a typical dish. ...
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Eating and drinking are undoubtedly amongst life’s most multisensory experiences. Take, for instance, the enjoyment of flavor, which is one of the most important elements of such experiences, resulting from the integration of gustatory, (retronasal) olfactory, and possibly also trigeminal/oral-somatosensory cues. Nevertheless, researchers have suggested that all our senses can influence the way in which we perceive flavor, not to mention our eating and drinking experiences. For instance, the color and shape of the food, the background sonic/noise cues in our eating environments, and/or the sounds associated with mastication can all influence our perception and enjoyment of our eating and drinking experiences. Human-Food Interaction (HFI) research has been growing steadily in recent years. Research into multisensory interactions designed to create, modify, and/or enhance our food-related experiences is one of the core areas of HFI (Multisensory HFI or MHFI). The aim being to further our understanding of the principles that govern the systematic connections between the senses in the context of HFI. In this Research Topic, we called for investigations and applications of systems that create new, or enhance already existing, multisensory eating and drinking experiences (what can be considered the “hacking” of food experiences) in the context of HFI. Moreover, we were also interested in those works that focus on or are based on the principles governing the systematic connections that exist between the senses. HFI also involves the experiencing of food interactions digitally in remote locations. Therefore, we were also interested in sensing and actuation interfaces, new communication mediums, and persisting and retrieving technologies for human food interactions. Enhancing social interactions to augment the eating experience is another issue we wanted to see addressed here, what has been referred to as “digital commensality”.
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Thesis
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Squat & Grow was a two-week series of workshops, talks and field trips aimed to support a sustainable food culture in Singapore, and test alternative scenarios of the Smart Nation plan. The project encouraged citizens to participate and co-design an open platform organized around DIY low-cost technology and "smart" food practices. In this paper, we describe two Squat & Grow workshops run by tutors from Indonesia and Singapore and show how the Smart Nation can be differently built through DIY biological and technological activities. We also demonstrate how Singapore becomes a conduit rather than a center for technological innovation and economic development within the region.
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This paper describes the design of a digital fork and a mobile interactive and persuasive game for a young child who is a picky eater and/or easily distracted during mealtime. The system employs Ubicomp technology to educate children on the importance of a balanced diet while motivating proper eating behavior. To sense a child's eating behavior, we have designed and prototyped a sensor-embedded digital fork, called the Sensing Fork. Furthermore, we have developed a story-book and per- suasive game, called the Hungry Panda, on a smartphone. This capitalizes on the capabilities of the Sensing Fork to interact with and modify children's eating behavior during mealtime. We report the results of a real-life study that involves mother-child subjects and tested the effectiveness of the Sensing Fork and Hungry Panda game in addressing children's eating problems. Our findings exhibit positive effects for changing children's eating be- havior. Copyright
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Domestic food wastage is a growing problem for the environment and food security. Some causes of domestic food wastes are attributed to a consumer’s behaviours during food purchasing, storage and consumption, such as: excessive food purchases and stockpiling in storage. Recent efforts in human-computer interaction research have examined ways of influencing consumer behaviour. The outcomes have led to a number of interventions that assist users with performing everyday tasks. The Internet Fridge is an example of such an intervention. However, new pioneering technologies frequently confront barriers that restrict their future impact in the market place, which has prompted investigations into the effectiveness of behaviour changing interventions used to encourage more sustainable practices. In this paper, we investigate and compare the effectiveness of two interventions that encourage behaviour change: FridgeCam and the Colour Code Project. We use FridgeCam to examine how improving a consumer’s food supply knowledge can reduce food stockpiling. We use the Colour Code Project to examine how improving consumer awareness of food location can encourage consumption of forgotten foods. We explore opportunities to integrate these interventions into commercially available technologies, such as the Internet Fridge, to: (i) increase the technology’s benefit and value to users, and (ii) promote reduced domestic food wastage. We conclude that interventions improving consumer food supply and location knowledge can promote behaviours that reduce domestic food waste over a longer term. The implications of this research present new opportunities for existing and future technologies to play a key role in reducing domestic food waste.
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Wikipedia was formally launched in 2001, but the first research papers mentioning it appeared only in 2002. Since then it raised a huge amount of interest in the research community. At first mainly the content creation processes and the quality of the content were studied, but later on it was picked up as a valuable source for data mining and for testing. In this paper we present preliminary results that characterize the research done on and using Wikipedia since 2002.
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Context: In order to preserve the value of Systematic Reviews (SRs), they should be frequently updated considering new evidence that has been produced since the completion of the previous version of the reviews. However, the update of an SR is a time consuming, manual task. Thus, many SRs have not been updated as they should be and, therefore, they are currently outdated. Objective: The main contribution of this paper is to support the update of SRs. Method: We propose USR-VTM, an approach based on Visual Text Mining (VTM) techniques, to support selection of new evidence in the form of primary studies. We then present a tool, named Revis, which supports our approach. Finally, we evaluate our approach through a comparison of outcomes achieved using USR-VTM versus the traditional (manual) approach. Results: Our results show that USR-VTM increases the number of studies correctly included compared to the traditional approach. Conclusions: USR-VTM effectively supports the update of SRs.
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We propose a method for recognizing ingredients in food preparing activity. The research for object recognition mainly focuses on only visual information; however, ingredients are difficult to recognize only by visual information because of their limited color variations and larger within-class difference than inter-class difference in shapes. In this paper, we propose a method that involves some physical signals obtained in a cutting process by attaching load and sound sensors to the chopping board. The load may depend on an ingredient's hardness. The sound produced when a knife passes through an ingredient reflects the structure of the ingredient. Hence, these signals are expected to facilitate more precise recognition. We confirmed the effectiveness of the integration of the three modalities (visual, auditory, and load) through experiments in which the developed method was applied to 23 classes of ingredients.
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We investigate the diversity of participatory design research practice, based on a review of ten years of participatory design research published as full research papers at the Participatory Design Conferences (PDC) 2002–2012, and relate this body of research to five fundamental aspects of PD from classic participatory design literature. We identify five main categories of research contributions: Participatory Design in new domains, Participatory Design methods, Participatory Design and new technology, Theoretical contributions to Participatory Design, and Basic concepts in Participatory Design. Moreover, we identify how participation is defined, and how participation is conducted in experimental design cases, with a particular focus on interpretation, planning, and decision-making in the design process.
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An introduction to the special issue on 'food and interaction design' is provided in the International Journal on Human-Computer Studies. The introduction reveals that energy use and food waste across the food lifecycle significantly contributes to environmental issues and is estimated to be producing 27%of green house gas emissions in the UK. The special issue draws attention to the growing and diverse field of human-computer interaction (HCI) researchers exploring the interstices of food, technology, and every day practices. This special issue builds on the CHI workshop of the same name where it has brought together the community of researchers that take food as a point from which to understand people and design technology.
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Science mapping aims to build bibliometric maps that describe how specific disciplines, scientific domains, or research fields are conceptually, intellectually, and socially structured. Different techniques and software tools have been proposed to carry out science mapping analysis. The aim of this article is to review, analyze, and compare some of these software tools, taking into account aspects such as the bibliometric techniques available and the different kinds of analysis.
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PaperLens is a novel visualization that reveals trends, connections, and activity throughout a conference community. It tightly couples views across papers, authors, and references. PaperLens was developed to visualize 8 years (1995-2002) of InfoVis conference proceedings and was then extended to visualize 23 years (1982-2004) of the CHI conference proceedings. This paper describes how we analyzed the data and designed PaperLens. We also describe a user study to focus our redesign efforts along with the design changes we made to address usability issues. We summarize lessons learned in the process of design and scaling up to the larger set of CHI conference papers.
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Informal histories of HCI commonly document two major intellectual waves that have formed the field: the first orienting from engineering/human factors with its focus on optimizing man-machine fit, and the second stemming from cognitive science, with an increased emphasis on theory and on what is happening not only in the computer but, simultaneously, in the human mind. In this paper, we document underlying forces that constitute a third wave in HCI and suggest systemic consequences for the CHI community. We provisionally name this the ‘phenomenological matrix’. In the course of creating technologies such as ubiquitous computing, visualization, affective and educational technology, a variety of approaches are addressing issues that are bad fits to prior paradigms, ranging from embodiment to situated meaning to values and social issues. We demonstrate the underlying unity of these approaches, and document how they suggest the centrality of currently marginal criteria for design, evaluation, appreciation, and developmental methodology in CHI work.
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Socialization, eating and play are core activities that make us human. While they are often brought together, play theory suggests that their combination has unexplored potential in the context of gastronomy. Our research also indicates that a chef’s desire to control the meal may be a key impediment to developing dining experiences in which the diner’s playful engagement impacts taste, texture and flavour combination. We investigate if combining participatory research through design and play theory might better situate chefs to diversify their approach to playful gastronomy. Using experimental design methods, we interviewed a chef, a maître d’, a professional gastronomist, two food enthusiasts and a novice, to identify overlooked opportunities to extend play in gastronomy. We then conducted a series of dinners – designed with and for experts, enthusiasts and novices – to explore these opportunities, and tested the resulting method through a workshop with student chefs and game designers. We present the method: Participatory Research through Gastronomy Design (PRGD), using the case of its development to explicate its characteristics. Our research suggests that PRGD supports the design of playful gastronomic experiences that appeal to a range of diners, affords exploration of play’s impact on social dynamics and can productively inform concrete design choices. It also – crucially – supports chefs to partially transfer control of how a meal unfolds, without diluting their sense of controlling the overall experience. PRGD thus addresses a key impediment to extending play in gastronomy. Gastronomy that responds to diners’ needs and desires for play are currently limited. We propose PRGD as an exciting – and viable – approach to address this limitation.
Conference Paper
Digital Gastronomy (DG) is a culinary concept that enhances traditional cooking with new HCI capabilities, rather than replacing the chef with an autonomous machine. Preliminary projects demonstrate implementation of DG via the deployment of digital instruments in a kitchen. Here we contribute an alternative solution, demonstrating the use of a modular (silicone) mold and a genetic mold-arrangement algorithm to achieve a variety of shape permutations for a recipe, allowing the control of taste structures in the dish. The mold overcomes the slow production time of 3D food printing, while allowing for a high degree of flexibility in the numerous shapes produced. This flexibility enables us to satisfy chefs' and diners' diverse requirements. We present the mold's logic, arithmetic, design and special parts, the evolutionary algorithm, and a recipe, exploiting a new digital cooking concept of programmable edible taste structures and taste patterns to enrich user interaction with a given recipe.
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Within Entertainment Computing, games research has grown to be its own area, with numerous publication venues dedicated to it. As this area evolves, it is fruitful to examine its overall development—which subcommunities and research interests were present from the start, which have come and gone, and which are currently active—to better understand the research community as a whole and where it may proceed. In this paper, we present a data-driven analysis and interactive visualization tool to shed light on how technical domains within the games research field have evolved from 2000 - 2013, based on publication data from over 8,000 articles collected from 48 games research venues, including Entertainment Computing, FDG, AIIDE, and DiGRA. The approach we present is descriptive. We first used data mining algorithms to group related papers into clusters of similar research topics and evolve these clusters over time. We then designed an interactive visualization system, named Seagull, comprised of Sankey diagrams that allow us to interactively visualize and examine the transition and coalescing of different clusters across time. We present our descriptive analysis in this paper and also contribute the visualization interface to allow other researchers to examine the data and develop their own analysis.
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In this paper we present a mobile system for nutrition logging which integrates multiple devices and modalities to facilitate food and drink tracking. The user is free to decide in each situation to use the most appropriate device combination out of a smartphone, smartwatch and smartscale. We describe the design and implementation of our system which is based on a requirements analysis. Finally, first results of a preliminary in-situ study with the prototype are reported giving first hints about the benefits and challenges of this multi-device approach in daily life scenarios.
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With the proliferation of sensory technologies that do not only stimulate the sense of vision and hearing, but also our sense of touch, smell, and taste, we are confronted with the challenge of mastering those "new" senses in the design of interactive systems. To meaningfully design multisensory interfaces and enrich human-technology interactions we need to systematically investigate the technical, perceptual, and experiential parameters of sensory and multisensory stimulation. Here, I particularly focus on the study of tactile, gustatory, and olfactory experiences facilitated by the use of novel technologies (e.g., mid-air haptic devices, olfactory devices) and the combination of objective and subjective measures within sensory science, psychology, HCI, and user experience research.
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Nutrient-based meal recommendations have the potential to help individuals prevent or manage conditions such as diabetes and obesity. However, learning people’s food preferences and making recommendations that simultaneously appeal to their palate and satisfy nutritional expectations are challenging. Existing approaches either only learn high-level preferences or require a prolonged learning period. We propose Yum-me, a personalized nutrient-based meal recommender system designed to meet individuals’ nutritional expectations, dietary restrictions, and fine-grained food preferences. Yum-me enables a simple and accurate food preference profiling procedure via a visual quiz-based user interface and projects the learned profile into the domain of nutritionally appropriate food options to find ones that will appeal to the user. We present the design and implementation of Yum-me and further describe and evaluate two innovative contributions. The first contriution is an open source state-of-the-art food image analysis model, named FoodDist. We demonstrate FoodDist’s superior performance through careful benchmarking and discuss its applicability across a wide array of dietary applications. The second contribution is a novel online learning framework that learns food preference from itemwise and pairwise image comparisons. We evaluate the framework in a field study of 227 anonymous users and demonstrate that it outperforms other baselines by a significant margin. We further conducted an end-to-end validation of the feasibility and effectiveness of Yum-me through a 60-person user study, in which Yum-me improves the recommendation acceptance rate by 42.63%.
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25 April 2017. Food Phreaking is the journal of experiments, exploits and explorations of the human food system. Each issue contains stories about the space where food, technology & open culture meet. Food Phreaking Issue 00 is the prequel and contains 38 short stories outlining what Food Phreaking is, and what it is not. Food Phreaking Issue 01 is "A Culinary Compendium of Curious Botanical Fruits". Issue 02 is called "What is In Vitro Meat?" And the newest issue, Issue 03, focusses on the human microbiome. Each issue is a slightly different format, incorporating different authors, images, and supplementary materials (timelines, visualizations, graphics, etc.). The Food Phreaking Journal is a platform for research, action, intervention, reflection and foresight.
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Many people are understandably excited by the suggestion that the chemical senses can be digitized; be it to deliver ambient fragrances (e.g., in virtual reality or health-related applications), or else to transmit flavour experiences via the internet. However, to date, progress in this area has been surprisingly slow. Furthermore, the majority of the attempts at successful commercialization have failed, often in the face of consumer ambivalence over the perceived benefits/utility. In this review, with the focus squarely on the domain of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), we summarize the state-of-the-art in the area. We highlight the key possibilities and pitfalls as far as stimulating the so-called ‘lower’ senses of taste, smell, and the trigeminal system are concerned. Ultimately, we suggest that mixed reality solutions are currently the most plausible as far as delivering (or rather modulating) flavour experiences digitally is concerned. The key problems with digital fragrance delivery are related to attention and attribution. People often fail to detect fragrances when they are concentrating on something else; And even when they detect that their chemical senses have been stimulated, there is always a danger that they attribute their experience (e.g., pleasure) to one of the other senses – this is what we call ‘the fundamental attribution error’. We conclude with an outlook on digitizing the chemical senses and summarize a set of open-ended questions that the HCI community has to address in future explorations of smell and taste as interaction modalities.
Conference Paper
Smart cities are one area of interactive systems design where the technologies and services of the Internet of Things (IoT) have the potential to serve public interest. In this paper we present a design research project that explores the use of IoT technologies-specifically environmental sensing-to support urban foraging. We describe the design of a simple proof-of-concept sensing platform to monitor the relative ripeness of fruit in trees, and reflect upon its potential effectiveness for urban foraging. From the project, we draw out themes for designing in the context of smart cities, including questioning the presumed "smartness" of IoT systems, and highlight issues in designing to support diverse community economies.
Conference Paper
While the idea of "celebratory technologies" during family mealtimes to support positive interactions at the dinner table is promising, there are few studies that investigate how these technologies can be meaningfully integrated into family practices. This paper presents the deployment of Chorus - a mealtime technology that orchestrates the sharing of personal devices and stories during family mealtimes, explores related content from all participants' devices, and supports revisiting previously shared content. A three-week field deployment with seven families shows that Chorus augments family interactions through sharing contents of personal and familial significance, supports togetherness and in-depth discussion by combining resources from multiple devices, helps to broach sensitive topics into familial conversation, and encourages participation from all family members including children. We discuss implications of this research and reflect on design choices and opportunities that can further enhance the family mealtime experience.
Conference Paper
Self-monitoring offers benefits in facilitating awareness about physical exercise, but such data-centric activity may not always lead to an enjoyable experience. We introduce EdiPulse a novel system that creates activity treats to offer playful reflections on everyday physical activity through the appealing medium of chocolate. EdiPulse translates self-monitored data from physical activity into small 3D printed chocolate treats. These treats (
Conference Paper
Context: An essential part of conducting software engineering (SE) research is the ability to identify extant research on tools, technologies, concepts and methods in order to evaluate and make rational and scientific decisions. The domain from which such knowledge is extracted is typically existing research literature found in journals, conference proceedings, books and gray literature. Empirical approaches that include various systematic review (SR) methodologies such as systematic literature review (SLR) and systematic mapping study (SMS) are found to be effective in this context. They adopt rigorous planning, follow repeatable and well-defined processes, and produce unbiased and evidence-based outcomes. Despite these significant benefits, the general trend on using these systematic review (SR) methodologies is not encouraging in SE research. The primary reasons emerging are twofold - a) SR methodologies are largely cited as time-consuming activities and b) lack of guidance to conduct systematic reviews. This tutorial discusses these concerns and describes an effective way of using SR methodologies for SE research. Objectives: Attendees will be introduced to the key concepts, methods and processes for conducting systematic literature reviews (SLR) and systematic mapping studies (SMS). The benefits, limitations, guidelines for using SR methodologies in an effective manner will discussed in the session. Attendees will be guided on the appropriate formulation of a research question and sub questions; the development of a review protocol such as inclusion criteria, exclusion criteria, quality criteria and classification structures; and execution of review protocol using digital libraries and syntheses of review data. A web based software tool1, for supporting the systematic literature review process will be demonstrated and attendees will get the opportunity to use the tool to conduct the review to help in identification of relevant research and extraction and synthesis of data. Method: We will use a blend of information presentation, interactive hands-on session and knowledge sharing session. The presentation will introduce the key concepts, benefits, limitations and how to overcome the limitations; hands on session will illustrate a review process with a case study, and finally the knowledge sharing session will discuss the experiences, best practices and the lesson learnt.
Conference Paper
We monitor chewing using 3D-printed eyeglasses with surface Electromyography (EMG) and skull vibration sensors integrated at the eyeglasses frame. We demonstrate the feasibility of recording chewing of different foods using the prototype. Users can explore the effect on EMG and vibration when chewing different food samples, e.g. apples, potato chips, and the system's ability to identify food categories. The prototype showed promising results detecting chewing and compensating for non-chewing activities.
Conference Paper
In this paper we propose the design fiction, Lyssna, a diegetic prototype in the form of a hearing aid for your refrigerator that aims at reintegrating lost aspects of food. Lyssna is based on home studies of food practices informed by Mediation Theory and Theories of Practice. Our aim is to explore an alternative framing from behavioral theories for designing for food waste. In the process, we hope to open up the design space for enabling reconfigurations of everyday food practices.
Conference Paper
In this work we study the feasibility and usability of an assistive food journaling system that sends users just-in-time reminders when unique hand gestures during food consumption are detected using a smartwatch. Our study shows that participants were able to sustain food logging throughout a 2-week period with the help of our eating detection system, as the number of reminders correlate well with the number of food logs. Despite the fact that participants were required to wear the watch on their dominant hand, it was still quite usable and did not interfere with their normal activities. Participant feedback provided additional insights to inform future work to increase detection accuracy, reduce detection delay, and allow for more dietary logging features in the app.
Conference Paper
The literature review is a key component of academic research, which allows researchers to build upon each other's work. While modern search engines enable fast access to publications, there is a lack of support for filtering out the vast majority of papers that are irrelevant to the current research focus. We present PaperQuest, a visualization tool that supports efficient reading decisions, by only displaying the information useful at a given step of the review. We propose an algorithm to find and sort papers that are likely to be relevant to users, based on the papers they have already expressed interest in and the number of citations. The current implementation uses papers from the CHI, UIST, and VIS conferences, and citation counts from Google Scholar, but is easily extensible to other domains of the literature.
Conference Paper
Eating is one of the most social of human activities; yet, scant attention has been paid to coordinating meal completion speeds. Addressing this challenge, we present "Keep Up With Me" - a novel augmented dining table designed to guide diners in keeping pace with each other. This mechatronical table incorporates a mechanism to gauge the relative weight of food on the dishes of dining partners. Actuators gradually raise the dish of a slower eating partner, and lower the dish of a faster eater by a corresponding amount. These discrete signals may iteratively bring the eating pace of dining companions back into mutual alignment. This table is offered as a contribution toward discussions around the subtle augmentation of dining and social experiences.
Conference Paper
Urban agriculture refers to the production of food in urban and peri-urban spaces. It can contribute positively to health and food security of a city, while also reducing 'food miles.' It takes on many forms, from the large and organised community garden, to the small and discrete backyard or balcony. This study focuses on small-scale food production in the form of residential gardening for home or personal use. We explore opportunities to support people's engagement in urban agriculture via human-computer interaction design. This research presents the findings and HCI design insights from our study of residential gardeners in Brisbane, Australia. By exploring their understanding of gardening practice with a human-centred design approach, we present six key themes, highlighting opportunities and challenges relating to available time and space; the process of learning and experimentation; and the role of existing online platforms to support gardening practice. Finally we discuss the overarching theme of shared knowledge, and how HCI could improve community engagement and gardening practice.
Conference Paper
Although food journaling is understood to be both important and difficult, little work has empirically documented the specific challenges people experience with food journals. We identify key challenges in a qualitative study combining a survey of 141 current and lapsed food journalers with analysis of 5,526 posts in community forums for three mobile food journals. Analyzing themes in this data, we find and discuss barriers to reliable food entry, negative nudges caused by current techniques, and challenges with social features. Our results motivate research exploring a wider range of approaches to food journal design and technology.
Conference Paper
In this study, we evaluate the taste intensity of food when a saltiness enhancer is applied, for verifying the effectiveness of our system. In a previous study, we proposed a saltiness enhancer using a cathodal current based on the work of Hettinger et al. However, we received feedback from subjects that other tastes (e.g., sourness and bitterness) are also enhanced. Therefore, we conducted experimental tests to compare the intensity of the fundamental tastes and a metallic taste over three phases: before application of current, during application of current, and after the release of current.
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We apply the knowledge discovery process to the mapping of current topics in a particular field of science. We are interested in how articles form clusters and what are the contents of the found clusters. A framework involving web scraping, keyword extraction, dimensionality reduction and clustering using the diffusion map algorithm is presented. We use publicly available information about articles in high-impact journals. The method should be of use to practitioners or scientists who want to overview recent research in a field of science. As a case study, we map the topics in data mining literature in the year 2011.
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Food and interaction design presents an interesting challenge to the HCI community in attending to the pervasive nature of food, the socio-cultural differences in food practices and a changing global foodscape. To design for meaningful and positive interactions it is essential to identify daily food practices and the opportunities for the design of technology to support such practices. This workshop brings together a community of researchers and practitioners in human-food interaction to attend to the practical and theoretical difficulties in designing for human-food interactions in everyday life. Through a practical field study and workshop we explore themes of food experiences, health and wellbeing, sustainability and alternative food cultures.
Book
"This book provides step-by-step instructions on how to analyze text generated from in-depth interviews and focus groups - i.e., transcripts. The book is primarily designed for research studies with an applied focus, but is also useful for theoretically oriented qualitative research. The book covers all aspects of the qualitative data analysis process including planning, data preparation, identification of themes, codebook development and code application, reliability and inter-coder agreement, data reduction techniques, comparative techniques, integration with quantitative data, and software considerations. The book describes what the authors call "applied thematic analysis", because it is the approach predominantly used in applied qualitative studies (and increasingly in academic contexts). The method employs a phenomenological approach to data analysis which has a primary aim of describing the experiences and perceptions of research participants. The approach presented is similar to Grounded Theory - in that it is inductive, content-driven, and searches for themes within textual data - and is complementary to Grounded Theory on many levels. However, within an applied context a phenomenological approach is primarily concerned with characterizing and summarizing perceptions and lived experiences and applying the results to a particular research problem, rather than building and assessing theoretical models"--
The state of the art in visualizing dynamic graphs
  • Fabian Beck
  • Michael Burch
  • Stephan Diehl
  • Daniel Weiskopf
Fabian Beck, Michael Burch, Stephan Diehl, and Daniel Weiskopf. 2014. The state of the art in visualizing dynamic graphs. EuroVis STAR 2 (2014), 1-21.
Using Art as an Insight to Identify Ethical and Sustainable Issues
  • Jeanne Bloch
  • Celine Verchere
Jeanne Bloch and Celine Verchere. 2018. Using Art as an Insight to Identify Ethical and Sustainable Issues. In Proceedings of the Designing Recipes for Digital Food Futures, a CHI workshop.