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Impact of Social Media Usage on Married Couple Behavior a Pilot Study in Middle East

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Abstract

As social animals, we are in need to communicate, collaborate and express our feelings and thoughts. But today our way of communication has changed; internet and social media occupied the imperious part of our lives. Now, community depend upon social media more than face to face communication to express themselves. But the use and role of social media vary from person to person. Growing evidence has shown that the social media has become the top addiction of present day time, which is affecting people’s life not only as individual but also as a community. Social media addiction also proved to be the cause of negative impact on the relationship especially among couples. As of fact, role of social media on the lives of couples is vacillating. In one prospect, social media is the source of getting support, while at the other end it is the cause of conflicts and some negative feelings among couples. This paper specifically aims at studying the impact of social media on the lives of couples in Middle East. For this purpose, a survey study was conducted, where almost 287 respondents participated. Results indicates that social media is the major cause of negative impact on the lives of couples.

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... M. Y. Muise et al., 2014;Williams 2012). Also, Gull et al. (2019) reported that tracking a partner's behavior online might increase jealousy, tension, and mistrust. ...
... Some married couples that spend a considerable amount of time using social media reported sad marital relationships because the excessive use of social media reduced accomplice interaction (AlRashed). Some spouses often feel ignored and are bothered by the time their partners spend online or worry about what they are doing online (Gull et al., 2019). In addition, the amount of time spent online might harm an individual's relationships with their relatives (Al-Saggaf, 2004;Yu et al., 2018;Clayton 2014) warns that, although social media sites can be useful by helping customers stay in touch with others, their excessive use may be dangerous to marital relationships. ...
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The present study investigated the associations between social media use integration and Technological Intimate Partner Violence (TIPV) while also exploring the mediating role of the three dimensions of jealousy and the moderating role of moral absolutism. Our sample consisted of 404 adults aged 18 to 59. The results indicated a significant positive effect of social media use integration on cognitive jealousy and TIPV. Social media use integration was correlated with behavioral jealousy and TIPV, while TIPV was positively associated with all three dimensions of jealousy. The moderated mediation analysis suggested that behavioral jealousy fully mediated the effect of social media use integration toward TIPV at all levels of moral absolutism, while cognitive jealousy had a partial mediating effect only at medium and high levels of moral absolutism. We discuss our findings by pointing out that (a) various dimensions of jealousy might be influenced differently by social media use integration, and (b) individuals with high levels of moral absolutism might be more prone to cognitive jealousy after being exposed to prolonged social media use. We acknowledge that our results may have limited generalizability as our sample was primarily female. Research involving larger portions of male participants would be important to pursue.
... Social media has transformed communication into social dialogue, dominates and reshapes society and culture. To date, social media sites are the Internet's most visited sites, and that number keep growing every day (Gull et al., 2019;Mustafa & Hamzah, 2011;Qualman, 2009). Due to the advancement of this technology, the world is more connected, and the implications towards interpersonal relationships are inevitable. ...
... Another study that covered many Middle East countries including Saudi Arabia investigated the impact of social media on married couples' behavior. The key findings from this study show that inappropriate posts of one of the couple and increased use of social media cause negative feelings such as loneliness, depression, lack of trust and ignorance (Gull et al., 2019). ...
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... Studies have highlighted the negative impact of online infidelity on marital relationships and its detrimental effect on the mental health of the offended spouse. [15] We decided to consider WhatsApp use (social media) for this study because research shows that social media addiction can have negative effects on the relationship of couples [16] and WhatsApp is most common social media used by people along with Facebook according to recent literature [17] and its use is increasing. Specialist doctors were considered as, for them, because of busy schedules of work, WhatsApp and other means of online communication can be the easy way to socialize and keep them updated along with its use for professional purposes. ...
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The social networking site (SNS) Facebook is becoming increasingly recognized as a medium through which individuals can investigate and monitor others' activities. However, little is known about whether Facebook monitoring behavior occurs within romantic relationships and, accordingly, the psychological predictors of this behavior. The present study employed an extended theory of planned behavior (TPB) framework including self-esteem, partner trust, and demographic characteristics, to predict frequent Facebook partner-monitoring. Facebook users (N=244) in romantic relationships completed measures assessing the standard TPB constructs (attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control), additional predictor variables (self-esteem and partner trust), and demographic characteristics (age, gender, relationship length, daily Facebook logins, and time spent per login). One week later, participants reported their level of Facebook partner-monitoring during the previous week. Regression analyses supported the standard TPB constructs of attitude and subjective norm in predicting intentions to engage in frequent Facebook partner-monitoring, with intention, in turn, predicting behavior. Partner trust, but not self-esteem, significantly predicted frequent Facebook partner-monitoring intentions. Of the demographic characteristics, daily Facebook logins significantly predicted both intention and behavior and, unexpectedly, relationship length directly affected behavior. Overall, the current study revealed that frequent Facebook partner-monitoring is influenced by attitudinal, normative, and relational factors and, potentially, increased visits to Facebook. These findings provide a new understanding of an individual's use of the world's leading SNS to monitor their partner's activities and provide a foundation for future studies to investigate the potential negative implications this activity may have for those in romantic relationships.
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