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Researching the lived life of the entrepreneur

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Abstract

This working paper begins to scope out the conceptualisation of a research project designed to integrate and address two perennial themes within the entrepreneurship literature, namely methodological innovation and enriching our understanding of the entrepreneurial process. Specifically, we propose a novel methodology exploiting the affordances of digital technologies to address the challenge of unobtrusive longitudinal data collection at scale in respect of the ‘lived life of the entrepreneur’.
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