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Women, Peace and Security: A Global Agenda in the Making

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Abstract

The disastrous consequences for the rights and physical and psychological protection of women during the wars of the 1990s, primarily in Somalia, Rwanda and Ex-Yugoslavia, shifted the focus of the United Nations (UN) Security Council towards human security and the protection of women. Due to advocating by women’s groups like the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF) and strong impulses from the 1995 Fourth Conference on Women in Beijing to include gender mainstreaming perspectives in all UN peace operations, the UN Security Council put gender in peace and security, especially the role of women, on its agenda.

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Chapter
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Chapter
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Book
This book uniquely applies securitization theory to the mass sexual violence atrocities committed during the Bosnia war and the Rwandan genocide. Examining the inherent links between rape, war and global security, Hirschauer analyses the complexities of conflict related sexual violence.
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