Article

Estimate the Activation of EEG Bands from Different Brain Lobes with Classified Music Stimulation

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Abstract

Physiological research with human brain is getting more popular because it is the center of human nervous system. Music is a popular source of entertainment in modern era which affects differently in different brain lobes for having different frequency and pitch. The brain lobes are divided into frontal, central and parietal lobe. In this paper, an approach has been proposed to identify the activated brain lobes by using spectral analysis from EEG signal due to music evoked stimulation. In later phase, the impact of music on the EEG bands (alpha, beta, delta, theta) originating from different brain lobes is analyzed. Music has both positive and negative impact on human brain activity. According to linguistic variation, subject age and preference, volume level of songs, the impact on different EEG bands varies. In this work, music is categorized as mild, pop, rock song at different volume level (low, comfortable and high) based on Power Spectral Density (PSD) analysis. The average PSD value is 0.21 W/Hz, 0.32W/Hz and 0.84W/Hz for mild, pop and rock song respectively. The volume levels are considered as 0%-15% volume level for low volume, 16%- 55% volume level for comfortable volume and 56%-100% volume level for high volume. At comfortable volume level the central lobe of the brain is more activated for mild song and parietal lobe is activated for both pop and rock songs based on logarithmic power and PSD analysis. A statistical test two- way ANOVA has been conducted to indicate the variation in EEG band. For two-way ANOVA analysis, the P-value was taken as 0.05. A topographical representation has been performed for effective brain mapping to show the effects of music on the EEG bands for mild, pop and rock songs at the mentioned volume level. The maximum percentage of alpha band activation is 60% in comfortable volume which decreases with high volume and it indicates that, when the music stimuli moved towards the high-volume level, human cognition state moves from relax to stress condition due to the activeness of beta band. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) has been designed in MATLAB platform for the entire work

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