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Determination of color developers replacing bisphenol A in thermal paper receipts using diode array and Corona charged aerosol detection—A German market analysis 2018/2019

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Thermal papers (e.g. point of sale receipts, adhesive labels, tickets) significantly contribute to contamination of paper material cycles and the environment with substances of (eco-) toxicological concern. In particular, they contain color developers like endocrine disrupting bisphenols in typical concentrations of about 1–2 percent per weight (wt%). Bisphenol A (BPA) was used as the common color developer over the last decades, but it will be restricted for thermal paper application in the European Union to a limit of 0.02 wt% from 2020 onwards. Consequently, a variety of BPA substituents such as bisphenol S (BPS) and its derivatives gain importance in thermal paper application. In this study, a rapid, reliable and cost-effective method for identification and quantification of BPA, alternative color developers and related substances like sensitizers is presented based on HPLC separation coupled with diode array detection (DAD) and Corona charged aerosol detection (CAD). Quantification was performed with regard to the intended use of the substances in thermal papers. Besides traditional UV external calibration using reference standards, alternative quantification approaches, in particular UV chromophore concentration for BPS derivatives and CAD universal response technique for low-volatile color developers, were applied and compared in order to allow quantification without reference substances. A market analysis for intended used color developers and sensitizers was performed on thermal paper samples (n = 211) collected in Germany during 2018 and 2019. Pergafast 201 (in 41.7% of the samples) was the most common color developer with concentrations above 0.02 wt%, followed by BPA (36.0%), BPS (13.3%) and other BPS derivatives known as D8, D-90, BPS-MAE and TGSA, that are mainly present in adhesive labels. Sensitizers were determined in over 90% of the samples.
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... Recently, new phenol-free ink developers had been reported in the literature as alternative to BPS and its analogous compounds, such as urea urethane compound (UU), N-(p-toluenesulfonyl)-N′-(3-p-toluenesulfonyloxyphenyl) urea (Pergafast 201), 4,4′-bis(N-carbamoyl-4-methylbenzenesulfonamide) diphenylmethane (BTUM), 4-hydroxyphenyl 4isoprooxyphenylsulfone (D-8), and 4-hydroxy-4′benzyloxydiphenylsulfone (BPS-MAE) (United States Environmental Protection Agency 2014; Eckardt et al. 2020). The Pergafast 201 and UU have been considered important non-phenolic bisphenol substitutes in the European market (Björnsdotter et al. 2017b). ...
... The Pergafast 201 and UU have been considered important non-phenolic bisphenol substitutes in the European market (Björnsdotter et al. 2017b). Although Pergafast 201 can be considered to be of low toxicity (Goldinger et al. 2015), its use has not been applied on a large scale due to its higher cost of manufacture; thus, thermal papers based on phenolic ink developers, especially BPA and BPS, are still more common and accessible in several countries (Eckardt et al. 2020). ...
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... Da BPA als gesundheitsschädlich gilt, darf es in Thermopapieren in der Europäischen Union ab dem Januar 2020 nur noch beschränkt einge-setzt werden. Als Folge werden heute vermehrt verschiedene alternative Entwickler verwendet [11]. Trotzdem wird BPA heute immer noch als Entwickler eingesetzt, weshalb im experimentellen Umgang mit Thermopapieren geeignete Vorsichtsmassnahmen (Handschuhe) zu treffen sind. ...
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Thermal paper contains potentially toxic additives, such as bisphenol A (BPA), as a common color developer. Because of its known endocrine disrupting effects, structural analogues to BPA, such as bisphenol S (BPS), D-8 and Pergafast 201, have been used as alternatives, but little is known about the presence and toxicological effects of alternatives other than BPS. In this study, thermal paper is screened by direct probe ambient mass spectrometry (rapid pre-screening method not requiring sample preparation) and by liquid chromatography (LC) with high resolution time-of flight (TOF-MS) mass spectrometry. Cash receipts and other thermal paper products (cinema tickets, boarding passes and luggage tags) were analyzed. Besides BPA and BPS, other developers only recently reported (Pergafast 201, D-8) or to the best of our knowledge not reported before (D-90, TGSA, BPS-MAE) were frequently found as well as some related unreported impurities (2,4-BPS that is a BPS related impurity and a TGSA related impurity). To gain some insight into the potential estrogenicity of the detected developers, a selection of extracts was further analyzed using a LC-nanofractionation platform in combination with cell-based bioassay testing. These preliminary results seems to indicate very low or absence of estrogenic activity for Pergafast 201, D-8, D-90, TGSA and BPS-MAE in comparison to BPA and BPS, although further dose-response tests with authentic standards are required to confirm these results. Compounds for which standards were available were also tested for developmental toxicity and neurotoxicity using zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. TGSA and D-8 induced similar teratogenic effects as BPA in zebrafish embryos. BPS and 2,4-BPS did not induce any developmental effects but 2,4-BPS did alter the locomotor activity at the tested concentration. Our findings suggest that the alternatives used as alternatives to BPA (except BPS) might not be estrogenic. However, TGSA and D-8 showed abnormal developmental effects similar to BPA.
Article
Bisphenol A (BPA), a synthetic xenoestrogen widely used in various industrial fields, can be present, in its un-reacted form, as an additive in thermal paper. BPA is virtually ubiquitous in industrialized societies and humans are exposed to this chemical via dietary and non-dietary sources. Since in 2015 European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) indicated that thermal paper, is the second source of BPA exposure after the food chain, some suppliers replaced BPA with its analogue Bisphenol S (BPS), speculatively supposed to be safer. In this work BPA and BPS concentration levels were determined in 50 thermal paper receipts collected in Italy by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem fluorescence and ultraviolet detection. BPA was found in 44 samples at mean concentration of 107.47 µg/100 mg of paper (from below Limits of Quantification (LOQ) to 1533.733 µg/100 mg of paper). BPS was found in 31 samples at mean concentration of 41.97 µg/100 mg of paper (from below the LOQ to 357.989 µg/100 mg of paper). 26 samples were positive to both BPA and BPS. The estimate daily intake (EDI) values of BPA and BPS occurring through dermal absorption were calculated for 70 kg body weight individuals. For general population, they were 0.0625 µg/day for BPA and 0.0244 µg/day for BPS, based on the mean content of bisphenols found. For occupationally exposed individuals, they were 66.8 µg/day for BPA and 15.6 µg/day for BPS, based on the worst scenario. Such levels would produce a dermal intake below the Tolerable Day Intake established by EFSA (4 µg/kg bw/day); nevertheless, the occurrence of co-exposure to dietary and non-dietary sources should be considered in the health risk assessment, mainly for people frequently exposed to thermal paper contact, as for occupational reason.
Article
This opinion describes the assessment of the risks to public health associated with bisphenol A (BPA) exposure. Exposure was assessed for various groups of the human population in three different ways: (1) external (by diet, drinking water, inhalation, and dermal contact to cosmetics and thermal paper); (2) internal exposure to total BPA (absorbed dose of BPA, sum of conjugated and unconjugated BPA); and (3) aggregated (from diet, dust, cosmetics and thermal paper), expressed as oral human equivalent dose (HED) referring to unconjugated BPA only. The estimated BPA dietary intake was highest in infants and toddlers (up to 0.875 µg/kg bw per day). Women of childbearing age had dietary exposures comparable to men of the same age (up to 0.388 µg/kg bw per day). The highest aggregated exposure of 1.449 µg/kg bw per day was estimated for adolescents. Biomonitoring data were in line with estimated internal exposure to total BPA from all sources. BPA toxicity was evaluated by a weight of evidence approach. “Likely” adverse effects in animals on kidney and mammary gland underwent benchmark dose (BMDL10) response modelling. A BMDL10 of 8 960 µg/kg bw per day was calculated for changes in the mean relative kidney weight in a two generation toxicity study in mice. No BMDL10 could be calculated for mammary gland effects. Using data on toxicokinetics, this BMDL10 was converted to an HED of 609 µg/kg bw per day. The CEF Panel applied a total uncertainty factor of 150 (for inter- and intra-species differences and uncertainty in mammary gland, reproductive, neurobehavioural, immune and metabolic system effects) to establish a temporary Tolerable Daily Intake (t-TDI) of 4 µg/kg bw per day. By comparing this t-TDI with the exposure estimates, the CEF Panel concluded that there is no health concern for any age group from dietary exposure and low health concern from aggregated exposure. The CEF Panel noted considerable uncertainty in the exposure estimates for non-dietary sources, whilst the uncertainty around dietary estimates was relatively low.
Article
Bisphenol A (BPA) is widely used as a color developer in thermal paper. Thermal paper is ubiquitous in daily life due to its use in cash register receipts, so opportunities for human contact abound. For this study, 10 blank cash register receipts were obtained from businesses in suburban Boston. BPA was extracted and analysis of concentration was performed using gas chromatograph/flame ionization detector. In some receipts, BPA was not detected but in others it was as high as 19 mg for a 12-inch long receipt, which is in line with concentrations indicated in patents. This study is intended to highlight the potential for human exposure to BPA as well as the ease with which exposure may be reduced through the use of BPA-free thermal paper.
Article
As the evidence of the toxic effects of bisphenol A (BPA) grows, its application in commercial products is gradually being replaced with other related compounds, such as bisphenol S (BPS). Nevertheless, very little is known about the occurrence of BPS in the environment. In this study, BPS was analyzed in 16 types of paper and paper products (n = 268), including thermal receipts, paper currencies, flyers, magazines, newspapers, food contact papers, airplane luggage tags, printing paper, kitchen rolls (i.e., paper towels), and toilet paper. All thermal receipt paper samples (n = 111) contained BPS at concentrations ranging from 0.0000138 to 22.0 mg/g (geometric mean: 0.181 mg/g). The overall mean concentrations of BPS in thermal receipt papers were similar to the concentrations reported earlier for BPA in the same set of samples. A significant negative correlation existed between BPS and BPA concentrations in thermal receipt paper samples (r = -0.55, p < 0.0001). BPS was detected in 87% of currency bill samples (n = 52) from 21 countries, at concentrations ranging from below the limit of quantification (LOQ) to 6.26 μg/g (geometric mean: 0.029 μg/g). BPS also was found in 14 other paper product types (n = 105), at concentrations ranging from <LOQ to 8.38 μg/g (geometric mean: 0.0036 μg/g; detection rate: 52%). The estimated daily intake (EDI) of BPS, through dermal absorption via handling of papers and currency bills, was estimated on the basis of concentrations and frequencies of the handling of papers by humans. The median and 95th percentile EDI values, respectively, were 4.18 and 11.0 ng/kg body weight (bw)/day for the general population and 312 and 821 ng/kg bw/day for occupationally exposed individuals. Among the paper types analyzed, thermal receipt papers were found to be the major sources of human exposure to BPS (>88%). To our knowledge, this is the first report on the occurrence of BPS in paper products and currency bills.
Article
Cyclic oligomers are the major substances migrating from polyamide (PA) food contact materials. However, no commercial standards are available for the quantification of these substances. For the first time the quantification of cyclic oligomers was carried out by HPLC coupled with a chemiluminescence nitrogen detector (CLND) and single-substance calibration. Cyclic monomer (MW = 226 Da) and dimer (MW = 452 Da) of PA66 were synthesised and equimolar N detection of CLND to synthesised oligomers, caprolactam, 6-aminohexanoic acid (monomers of PA6) and caffeine (a typical nitrogen calibrant) was proven. Relative response factors (UVD at 210 nm) referring to caprolactam were determined for cyclic PA6 oligomers from dimer to nonamer, using HPLC-CLND in combination with a UVD. A method for quantification of cyclic oligomer content in PA materials was introduced using HPLC-CLND analysis and caffeine as a single nitrogen calibrant. The method was applied to the quantification of cyclic PA oligomers in several PA granulates. For two PA6 granulates from different manufacturers markedly different oligomer contents were analysed (19.5 versus 13.4 g kg⁻¹). The elution pattern of cyclic oligomers offers the possibility of identifying the PA type and differentiating between PA copolymers and blends.
Article
Bisphenol A (BPA) is used in a variety of consumer products, including some paper products, particularly thermal receipt papers, for which it is used as a color developer. Nevertheless, little is known about the magnitude of BPA contamination or human exposure to BPA as a result of contact with paper and paper products. In this study, concentrations of BPA were determined in 15 types of paper products (n = 202), including thermal receipts, flyers, magazines, tickets, mailing envelopes, newspapers, food contact papers, food cartons, airplane boarding passes, luggage tags, printing papers, business cards, napkins, paper towels, and toilet paper, collected from several cities in the USA. Thermal receipt papers also were collected from Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. BPA was found in 94% of thermal receipt papers (n = 103) at concentrations ranging from below the limit of quantitation (LOQ, 1 ng/g) to 13.9 mg/g (geometric mean: 0.211 mg/g). The majority (81%) of other paper products (n = 99) contained BPA at concentrations ranging from below the LOQ to 14.4 μg/g (geometric mean: 0.016 μg/g). Whereas thermal receipt papers contained the highest concentrations of BPA (milligram-per-gram), some paper products, including napkins and toilet paper, made from recycled papers contained microgram-per-gram concentrations of BPA. Contamination during the paper recycling process is a source of BPA in paper products. Daily intake (DI) of BPA through dermal absorption was estimated based on the measured BPA concentrations and handling frequency of paper products. The daily intake of BPA (calculated from median concentrations) through dermal absorption from handling of papers was 17.5 and 1300 ng/day for the general population and occupationally exposed individuals, respectively; these values are minor compared with exposure through diet. Among paper products, thermal receipt papers contributed to the majority (>98%) of the exposures.
Article
Metal cans for food use can be coated with lacquers based on polyester resins. Recent research has focussed on the identification and quantification of migrants released by coatings that are potentially absorbable (below 1000 Da). The presented method describes a procedure that was optimized to hydrolyse the polyester migrants into their monomers, polyvalent acids and polyols. The polyols were identified by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection GC-FID and the acids by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with an ultraviolet and an electrospray ionization-mass selective detector (HPLC-ESI-MSD/UVD), respectively. With the knowledge of the polyester monomers, it was possible--at least tentatively--to identify the main components in the migrate as cyclic oligoesters by HPLC-ESI-MSD/UVD. A cyclic oligomer, CYCLO [3IPA (isophthalic acid) 3EG (ethylene glycol)] was synthesized and characterized by infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry as well as by elementary analysis for further confirmation. To determine the amount of migrating cyclic oligoesters, the response of the migrating substances was compared using different detectors, UVD, MSD and evaporative light scattering detector (ELSD). The response of the ELSD was dependent on the molecular weight of the analytes that reduced the accuracy of this detection type. The wavelength with the same absorption coefficient for IPA and terephthalic acid (TPA) was obtained at 232 nm. The UV(232nm) response of an oligoester is proportional to the number of its IPA/TPA moieties, which was verified for several TPA/IPA esters. The amount of the migrating oligoesters was determined using an UV(232nm) calibration of a commercially available TPA ester and the number of IPA/TPA moieties molecules gained from the ESI-MSD spectra. According to this method, the amount of migrating oligoesters below 1000 Da in the 95% ethanol migrate varied from 0.1 to 0.6 mg dm(-2) (0.6-3.6 mg kg(-1) food) in the examined coatings. The determined amounts account for about 50% of the total migrate below 1000 Da.
stated a BPA percentage of 52% in the Netherlands (29 samples), 42% in Sweden (34) and Norway (12), respectively, while Spain (25) remained highest usage of BPA in 88% of the samples
  • Björnsdotter
However, the situation might be heterogeneous between different European countries. Björnsdotter et al. (2017) stated a BPA percentage of 52% in the Netherlands (29 samples), 42% in Sweden (34) and Norway (12), respectively, while Spain (25) remained highest usage of BPA in 88% of the samples [12]. The most common substituents were BPS (28% in the Netherlands, 30% in Sweden, 8% in Spain) and PF201 (14% in the Netherlands, 27% in Sweden, 58% in Norway) [
  • Us Epa
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Supramolecular solvent-based microextraction of emerging bisphenol A replacements (color developers) in indoor dust from public environments
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Universal response in liquid chromatography using charged aerosol detection
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Universal response model for a corona charged aerosol detector
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