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The Functional Behavioral Assessment (FBA) approach involves the use of single-case designs (SCD) to study the problem behavior-environment contingencies and conduct interventions that consider this functional relationship. Although this approach has been considered an evidence-based practice (EBP) for the treatment of several psychological problems, no meta-analytic studies of FBA-based interventions on delusions, hallucinations and disorganized speech -commonly operationalized as "atypical vocalizations"- have been carried out. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to review and synthesize the results of FBA-based interventions on adults' atypical vocalizations. We conducted a systematic review and a multi-level meta-analysis of these interventions, using a recently developed effect size estimator for SCD studies (i.e., log response ratio). All the studies that met our eligibility criteria provided evidence supporting the effectiveness of FBA-based interventions on atypical vocalizations, with an overall average effect size of a 72% reduction. Both the publication year and the methodological quality were found to be significant moderators. Despite some methodological limitations, we can conclude that FBA-based interventions are effective to reduce atypical vocalizations. The implications of these results could be of interest for the mental health community.
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Abstract
Purpose: The Functional Behavioral Assessment (FBA) approach involves the use of single-
case designs (SCD) to study the problem behavior-environment contingencies and conduct
interventions that consider this functional relationship. Although this approach has been
considered an evidence-based practice (EBP) for the treatment of several psychological
problems, no meta-analytic studies of FBA-based interventions on delusions, hallucinations and
disorganized speech -commonly operationalized as “atypical vocalizations- have been carried
out. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to review and synthesize the results of FBA-based
interventions on adults’ atypical vocalizations. Methods: We conducted a systematic review and
a multi-level meta-analysis of these interventions, using a recently developed effect size
estimator for SCD studies (i.e., log response ratio). Results: All the studies that met our
eligibility criteria provided evidence supporting the effectiveness of FBA-based interventions on
atypical vocalizations, with an overall average effect size of a 72% reduction. Both the
publication year and the methodological quality were found to be significant moderators.
Conclusions: Despite some methodological limitations, we can conclude that FBA-based
interventions are effective to reduce atypical vocalizations. The implications of these results
could be of interest for the mental health community.
Practitioner points
FBA-based interventions are effective to reduce atypical verbalizations.
They showed an overall high effect size reduction (62% to 79%).
Personal- diagnosis- nor intervention-related variables are effectiveness moderators.
FBA-BASED INTERVENTIONS ON ATYPICAL VOCALIZATIONS 2
FBA-based interventions on adults’ delusions, hallucinations and disorganized speech: a single
case meta-analysis
Delusions, hallucinations and disorganized speech are symptoms of different mental illnesses
and disorders as a schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or some types of dementia (APA, 2013). These
phenomena are the source of serious problems in the functioning of personal, social and work
daily life. In addition, they generate large economic and social costs (Whiteford et al., 2013).
Although many efforts have been invested in dealing with these problems (Lutgens, Gariepy, &
Malla, 2017; Skelton, Khokhar, & Thacker, 2015; Turner, van der Gaag, Karyotaki, & Cuijpers,
2014), providing an effective, efficient and ethically-informed treatment is still one of the main
unresolved objectives of psychiatry and psychology (National Institute for Health and Care
Excellence, 2014).
In this regard, the functional approach to psychology might offer some interesting
insights. Within this approach, delusions, hallucinations and disorganized speech have
traditionally been operationalized in terms of bizarre or atypical vocalizations (Sturmey, Ward-
Horner, Marroquin, & Doran, 2007). A large body of evidence from the behavior analysis
literature has shown that atypical vocalizations are behavioral responses influenced by
environmental contingencies (Layng & Andronis, 1984; Mace, 1994; Mace, Lalli, & Lalli, 1991;
Wong, 2014). These studies assess the contextual variables that maintain this kind of problems to
produce significant clinical changes by directly modifying their maintaining variables (Mace,
1994).
In this regard, Functional Behavioral Assessment (FBA) is a pretreatment ideographic set
of assessments which aim is to identify variables associated with the occurrence of a specific
behavior, in order to develop an idiosyncratic intervention aimed at promoting behavioral
FBA-BASED INTERVENTIONS ON ATYPICAL VOCALIZATIONS 3
changes (Iwata et al., 1994). There are three types of FBA: indirect (e.g. interviews), descriptive
(e.g. direct observations) and experimental (e.g. manipulation of contextual variables). All of
them have proven useful to determine the variables that maintain different problem behaviors
(Beavers, Iwata, & Lerman, 2013). In addition, some assessment procedures can be modified to
overcome the limitations intrinsic to a specific kind of problem, like psychotic behavior
(Sturmey et al., 2007).
Therefore, FBA-based interventions are interventions guided by the results of a previous
FBA. They typically employ a single-case design (SCD), which allows for the variables that
control problem behavior to be detected and manipulated. These interventions are thus designed
attending to the function of problem behavior (i.e., why does it occur) and not to its morphology.
They might also be more ecologically valid, since they can facilitate the generalization of clinical
changes across different contexts. The more the FBA conditions resemble the natural
circumstances in which the problem behavior occur, the more likely the successful achievement
of a stable behavioral change will be (Hurl, Wightman, Haynes, & Virués-Ortega 2016).
Since FBA-based interventions were first formally established in institutional contexts
(Carr, 1977; Iwata, Dorsey, Slifer, Bauman, & Richman, 1994), the major developments and
applications have occurred in educational settings and, specifically, in the intervention on
children with developmental problems (Madden, Dube, Hackenberg, Hanley, & Lattal, 2013).
However, the very first steps towards the development of formal FBA-based interventions were
taken in institutionalized patients diagnosed with schizophrenia or other severe mental problems
(Ayllon & Michael, 1959; Lindsley, 1956). These studies were the first to demonstrate how the
behavior of people diagnosed with schizophrenia could be maintained and modified according to
the principles of operant behavior (Ferster & Skinner, 1957).
FBA-BASED INTERVENTIONS ON ATYPICAL VOCALIZATIONS 4
The functional definition of hallucinations, delusions and disorganized speech has
allowed for the establishment of a whole research field focused on the development of
interventions aimed at achieving a significant clinical change in atypical verbal behaviors
traditionally associated with schizophrenia (Rosenfarb, 2013). The main advances in this
research field could be summarized in four key points:
1) Pathognomonic symptoms of schizophrenia (e.g., hallucinations, delusions, etc.) or
other serious mental illnesses are problems that can be successfully treated by
managing the contingencies that maintain these behaviors (Burns, Heiby, & Tharp,
1983)
2) Functional analysis can be used to establish these maintaining contingencies (Mace
et al., 1991)
3) These contingencies can be managed and controlled through verbal interaction
(Baruch, Kanter, Busch, & Juskiewicz, 2009)
4) Through this type of intervention, pharmaceutical spending is reduced (Markwick,
Smith, & Mick, 2014).
In summary, the key achievement of behavioral analysis in clinical contexts is that it has
proven effective in changing user behaviors in a cost-efficient, non-invasive and idiosyncratic
way (Madden et al., 2013).
According to APA Presidential Task Force (APA, 2006), systematic reviews and meta-
analyses (e.g., Lutgens et al., 2017; Turner et al., 2014) have been established as a useful tool to
evaluate and compare the effects of different interventions and thus determine if a given
procedure can be regarded as an Evidence-Based Practice (EBP). However, few publications
have focused on studying the available evidence of FBA-based interventions. Perhaps this lack
FBA-BASED INTERVENTIONS ON ATYPICAL VOCALIZATIONS 5
of studies is due to common misunderstandings about the SCD used in FBA scientific literature
(see Shadish, 2014). However, due to the efforts made to improve the mathematical models that
allow for a more adequate synthesis of SCD studies and to the renewed interest in person-
centered practice, these types of studies are increasingly being recognized as a valuable source of
evidence for improving decision-making in health systems (Shadish, Hedges, & Pustejovsky,
2014). For example, Common, Lane, Pustejovsky, Johnson, and Johl (2017) carried out a meta-
analysis of FBAbased interventions for students with or at-risk of high-incidence disabilities,
showing that FBAbased interventions could be determined as an EBP following the Standards
for EBP (APA, 2006; Shadish, 2014). In addition, Hurl et al. (2016) performed a meta-analysis
of studies comparing FBA-based interventions with non-FBA-based interventions. They found
that, while the former had a large effect on the reduction of problem behavior, the latter had no
effect when compared to no intervention. They also showed that the effect of FBA-based
interventions on appropriate behaviors was four times greater than the effect found in non-FBA-
based interventions.
However, research on FBA-based interventions on problem behaviors other than
developmental or school-related problems is still scarce. Regarding FBA-based interventions on
delusions, hallucinations and disorganized speech, different narrative reviews have been
published (Layng & Andronis, 1984; Mace, 1994; Mace et al., 1991; Wong, 2014) but no
systematic reviews nor meta-analytic syntheses have been carried out. Therefore, the main
objective of this paper is to review and synthetize the published evidence of FBA-based
interventions on atypical vocalizations.
Method
Literature search
FBA-BASED INTERVENTIONS ON ATYPICAL VOCALIZATIONS 6
The plain research question was: Are FBA-based interventions effective in treating
adults’ delusions, hallucinations and disorganized speech? This question was elaborated
considering the strategy PICOS commonly used to identify components of clinical evidence for
systematic reviews in evidence-based practice and is endorsed by the Cochrane Collaboration
(Higgins et al., 2011).
Consequently, we reviewed different SCD studies that reported outcomes of FBA-based
interventions on adults’ atypical vocalizations. The literature search was conducted using the
following databases: PsycInfo, PubMed, Web of Science, and Open Grey. Common search terms
employed were functional analysis, hallucinatory speech, delusional statements and
disorganized speech. Only papers published in English or Spanish were included, both because
the vast majority of scientific literature is published in these languages and because these were
the only languages well known by the authors. No restrictions on the publication date were
applied. Preliminary searches started in January 2018 and formal screening of search results
against eligibility criteria was carried out in February 2018. This work was carried out following
the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses standards (Moher,
Liberati, Tetzlaff, & Altman, 2009) and reporting standards of the Meta-Analysis Reporting
Standards (APA Publications and Communications Board Working Group on Journal Article
Reporting Standards, 2008). The search strategy can be found in the following link:
https://osf.io/7vzda/?view_only=92e057b116bc4297a70557c7420f680d. In addition, the search
protocol was pre-registered in PROSPERO.
Studies were considered for inclusion if they met the following criteria: single-case
design and FBA-based interventions for hallucinatory speech (e.g., verbal responses to not
present stimuli), delusional speech (e.g., obviously false statements) or disorganized speech (e.g.,
FBA-BASED INTERVENTIONS ON ATYPICAL VOCALIZATIONS 7
stereotyped or repetitive verbal responses) in adult participants. All cases were included
regardless of the mental disorder diagnosis or concurrent pharmacological treatment. Studies that
did not conduct a functional assessment or did not perform an intervention on an adult were
excluded. A total of 213 studies were retrieved from the database searches and, finally, 23 SCD
studies met inclusion criteria and were included in the review. Figure 1 shows the study selection
process flux diagram.
Variables and data extraction procedure
The data extraction of the selected studies was focused on the following variables: patient
information (age, gender, mental disorder diagnosis), problem behavior information (behavioral
morphology and behavior function), intervention characteristics (functional assessment method,
intervention technique, duration, intervention setting, concurrent pharmacological treatment and
pharmacological treatment changes), methodological characteristics (single-subject experimental
design) and intervention outcomes (behavioral direct measures in baseline, post-treatment data
and follow-up data of problem behaviors and appropriate behaviors). To extract the results of
each intervention we used the WebPlotDigitizer software (Rohatgi, 2018), as recommended by
Moeyaert, Maggin, & Verkuilen (2016). This software allowed us to extract each individual data
point of the behavioral measures reflected in the graphs provided by the included works.
The literature search process inter-rater reliability was separately calculated as follows.
Firstly, screening inter-rater reliability was calculated as the percentage of times that both raters
independently evaluated a publication as either eligible or non-eligible for inclusion; it was 94%.
Secondly the inter-rater reliability of intervention and methodological study characteristics was
calculated as the percentage of data variables within each study that were exactly rated by both
researchers. All studies were evaluated by one researcher, while the other reviewed 1 of every 3
FBA-BASED INTERVENTIONS ON ATYPICAL VOCALIZATIONS 8
studies selected at random; the inter-rater reliability at this phase was 100%. Finally, data
extraction inter-rater reliability calculated as the percentage of data extracted from one
intervention per case within each study that were equally rated by both researchers, with a 1%
margin of error-, was conducted in the same way. Again, inter-rater reliability at this phase was
100%. All disagreements were settled by consensus with a third researcher.
Quality analysis
We conducted a quality analysis to determine the methodological quality of the study
sample. Two researchers independently conducted a quality analysis of each intervention within
each SCD study, following the criteria of the What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) SCD Panel
(Kratochwill et al., 2010). We chose to follow the WWC SCD recommendations because it
specifies in great practical detail how to conduct a comprehensive analysis of the key
methodological characteristics of a good single case design. In addition, it allowed us to classify
each intervention within each reviewed study depending on a) whether it met the WWC
standards, it met them with reservations or it did not meet them; and b) whether its visual
analysis showed strong, moderate or no evidence of a causal relation between the intervention
and the observed changes in the target behavioral outcome. To quantify the results of the quality
analysis, each intervention was assigned a score from 0 to 6 following the quality index
guidelines described in Hurl et al. (2016): 6 = interventions that meet the WWC standards and
present strong evidence of a causal relation; 5 = meet the standards and present moderate
evidence; 4 = meet the standards with reservations and present strong evidence; 3 = meet the
standards with reservations and present moderate evidence; 2 = meet the standards and present
no evidence; 1 = meet the standards with reservations and present no evidence; and 0 = do not
meet the standards.
FBA-BASED INTERVENTIONS ON ATYPICAL VOCALIZATIONS 9
The quality analysis inter-rater reliability was calculated as the percentage of included
interventions which methodological characteristics and visually-inspected evidence for a causal
relation were rated the same by both researchers. As with the data extraction process, one
researcher rated all studies and the other was randomly assigned the 30%. The quality analysis
inter-rater reliability was 100% for methodological characteristics and 90% for the visual
analysis of the intervention outcome. All disagreements were settled by consensus.
Effect size analysis
Among the different effect size estimators found in the literature, we chose the Log
Response Ratio (LRR; LRRd for a decrease size effect and LRRi for an increase size effect), a
recently developed effect size estimator for single-case studies of free-operant behavior
(Pustejovsky, 2015, 2018). It was chosen for its statistical properties and for its adequacy to the
characteristics of our study sample (see Pustejovsky, 2015, 2018; Zimmerman, Pustejovsky, et
al., 2018). In addition, in contrast to other parametric effect sizes, this within-case parametric
effect size estimator can be obtained for each case within a SCD study, thus allowing for a
quantitative synthesis of single-case interventions to be performed (Pustejovsky, 2015, 2018).
The LRR effect size parameter is defined as:
𝜓 = ln(𝜇𝐵
𝜇𝐴),
where ln() stands for the natural logarithm function, μA stands for the baseline mean level and μB
stands for the treatment mean level. However, this effect size parameter implies a series of
assumptions that may not be realistic given the characteristics of many SCD studies. Thus, a
series of bias corrections are needed to achieve a proper effect size estimator. Specifically, the
problem of auto-correlation (i.e., non-independent sampling of the outcome measure) could yield
FBA-BASED INTERVENTIONS ON ATYPICAL VOCALIZATIONS 10
biased LRR sampling variances (Pustejovsky, 2018). A method to control for this problem is
outlined below.
Although the main target of our review were the interventions on atypical vocalizations
(i.e., LRRd), the LRR was also calculated for interventions on appropriate behavior (i.e., LRRi),
when this measure was included. Since 5 studies did not assessed behavioral outcomes through
direct observation or did not report the results across each intervention phase, the LRRd was
estimated from the data of 19 cases (18 studies), out of the 23 studies that first met the inclusion
criteria. Out of those 19 cases, only 11 included measures of appropriate behavior. Since many
cases included several interventions, we only calculated the LRR for the intervention that
showed the highest quality analysis index. All calculations were done with the software R v3.0.5
(R Core Team, 2018), specifically the SingleCaseES package (Pustejovsky, 2018).
Quantitative synthesis
We then proceeded to conduct a quantitative synthesis of the results of the 19 FBA-based
interventions for atypical vocalizations. The WWC SCD Panel stablishes that a 5-3-20 threshold
must be met before the results of a given set of SCD studies can be summarized, so that it must
include: a) at least 5 studies that meet the WWC standards with or without reservations; b)
studies carried out by at least 3 different research teams from three different institutions with no
overlapping authorship; c) a total number of cases of at least 20. Although our study sample met
a) and b), it did not meet c), given that we only had 19 case interventions. Still, since the
characteristics of our study sample were quite close to meet the WWC 5-3-20 threshold, we
deemed it appropriate to conduct an exploratory quantitative synthesis.
Prior to the analysis, we screened for standardized z values larger than 3,29 or smaller
than -3,29 to control for the presence of potential outliers that could influence the overall average
FBA-BASED INTERVENTIONS ON ATYPICAL VOCALIZATIONS 11
outcome (Assink & Wibbelink, 2016). We then conducted a random effects multilevel meta-
analysis (Assink & Wibbelink, 2016; Konstantopoulos, 2011) using the metafor package in R
(Viechtbauer, 2010). The random effects approach to meta-analysis was deemed appropriate
given the considerable degree of heterogeneity of our study sample. On the other hand, the
multilevel meta-analytic model was deemed appropriate since it adds random effects at both the
case level and the study level, thus accounting for the problem of correlation between effects
within the same study (Konstantopoulos, 2011; Pustejovsky, 2018).
Therefore, the main possible sources of heterogeneity in our meta-analytic model were
three: sampling variance (i.e., heterogeneity due to the recording of the target behavior), within-
study variance (i.e., heterogeneity due to the differences among cases within a given study) and
between-study variance (i.e., heterogeneity due to the differences among studies). Estimates of
within-study variance (ω2) and between-study variance (τ2) were obtained through a restricted
maximum likelihood method (Pustejovsky, 2018; Viechtbauer, 2010). However, the estimation
of both variance components is dependent on the accuracy of the sampling variance, which in the
case of SCD studies might be affected by the abovementioned problem of auto-correlation
(Hedges, Tipton, & Johnson, 2010). A procedure of robust variance estimation with small-
sample corrections was applied through the clubSandwich package in R (Pustejovsky, 2018), to
obtain robust ω2 and τ2 estimates even in the presence of auto-correlation (Hedges et al., 2010;
Tipton, 2015). In addition, we performed two separated log-likelihood-ratio tests to determine
whether the within-study and between-study variance components were significant (Assink &
Wibbelink, 2016). However, given the potential threat that the log-likelihood-ratio tests would
not be significant due to the small number of effect sizes, we also calculated the percentage of
the total amount of heterogeneity located at each level (sampling variance, case-level and study-
FBA-BASED INTERVENTIONS ON ATYPICAL VOCALIZATIONS 12
level). We applied the 75% rule described in Assink & Wibbelink (2016), which states that if the
sampling variance does not account for at least the 75% of the total amount of variance, then
heterogeneity can be regarded as substantial and moderator analyses should be performed.
Finally, to account for the amount of heterogeneity due to the differences in the
abovementioned study characteristics, we performed a mixed effects multilevel meta-analysis.
We first analyzed every potential moderator separately to detect which were significant. Once
single significant moderators were detected, a mixed effects multilevel meta-analysis with
multiple moderators was performed.
Results
Characteristics of the study sample
A total of 23 studies (see Table 2) were included in this review. Tables 1 and 2 present
the study characteristics and participant information. These studies report the results of FBA-
based interventions for atypical vocalizations of 24 adult participants (51.1% female). One of the
included studies reported two cases. All participants were adults (mean = 35.5) no older than 65
years. Most participants had multiple diagnosis (41%). The most frequent diagnosis was
schizophrenia (29.1%). The 41.1% of the participants presented multiple behavioral problem
morphology, (e.g., delusional and hallucinatory speech). The most frequent target behavior was
delusional speech (25%). In addition, attention was the most common function of problem
behavior (58.33%).
The most used FBA method was the experimental one (41.1%). In 5 studies, two FBA-
methods were used. The ABK design was the most used in the different interventions (91%); only
two studies employed a multiple baseline design. Interventions generally included several
behavior modification techniques (58.3%). The most common combined intervention was the
FBA-BASED INTERVENTIONS ON ATYPICAL VOCALIZATIONS 13
differential reinforcement of appropriate behaviors plus extinction of the problem behaviors
(50%). All data are presented in Table 2.
Regarding the methodological quality, the different interventions included in each case (n
= 48) showed great differences in their associated quality analysis indexes. We rated 29
interventions (60,4%) intended to decrease atypical vocalizations (extracted from the total 24
cases) and 19 interventions (40,6%) intended to increase appropriate vocalizations (extracted
from 17 cases). 12 interventions on atypical vocalizations (41,7%), extracted from 10 different
cases, demonstrated acceptable methodological quality rates (i.e., QA index ≥ 3). On the
contrary, only 5 FBA-interventions on appropriate behavior showed acceptable methodological
quality indexes. Many of the 0 scores were due to the fact that they did not have a minimal AB2
design (i.e., ABAB).
Meta-analysis
Table 3 shows a summary of descriptive statistics, LRRd and its associated standard error
for each intervention phase. The percentage decrease of atypical vocalizations that appears in
Table 2 was calculated from the LRRd estimate
1
. Since none of the standardized z values
associated to each LRRd estimate were larger than 3,29 or smaller than -3,29, all the reviewed
interventions were included in the meta-analysis.
Figure 2 presents the forest plot of the random effects multilevel meta-analysis of the
selected interventions on atypical vocalizations.
1
Although LRRi is not reported, the percentage increase of appropriate behavior that
appears in Table 2 was calculated from the LRRi obtained for those interventions.
FBA-BASED INTERVENTIONS ON ATYPICAL VOCALIZATIONS 14
Table 4 includes a summary of the results of both the random effects multilevel meta-
analysis (Model I) and the mixed effects multilevel meta-analysis (Model II). Across the 19
cases, the overall average effect size was -1.26 (p < .001), 95% CI: [-0.959, -1.56], which
approximately corresponds to a percentage decrease in atypical vocalizations of 72%, 95% CI:
[62%, 79%]. The associated robust standard error was 0.142. The robust within-study variance
component was ω2 = 0.001. This result was expected given the low number of studies with more
than one case. On the other hand, the robust between-study variance estimator was τ2 = 0.309.
This result could indicate a high degree of unaccounted heterogeneity in effects across studies.
However, none of the two separated log-likelihood-ratio tests for each variance component
yielded significant results (p > .05). Nonetheless, since the percentage amount of the total
variance that could be attributed to the sampling variance level was just an 8%, we decided to
follow the 75% rule described in Assink & Wibbelink (2016) and keep the multi-level meta-
analytic model while checking for possible moderators.
We then conducted a mixed effects multilevel meta-analysis to detect potential
moderators that could partially account for the unexplained heterogeneity. The potential
continuous moderators considered were the publication year and the participant’s age. The
potential categorical moderators considered were: participant’s gender (male or female), type of
functional assessment (indirect, direct, experimental or mixed), intervention technique
(differential reinforcement, non-contingent reinforcement or time-out), behavior morphology
(hallucinations, delusions, disorganized speech or mixed), diagnosis (schizophrenia, multiple or
other), diagnosis nature (developmental vs. non-developmental condition), recording procedure
(event counting, continuous recording or partial interval recording) and the quality analysis index
(QA-0, QA-3 or QA-5).
FBA-BASED INTERVENTIONS ON ATYPICAL VOCALIZATIONS 15
The omnibus tests for each potential moderator yielded only two significant moderators:
the publication year (F(1, 17) = 4.497, p = .034) and the quality analysis index (F(2, 16) = 9.393,
p = .009). The publication year regression coefficient (-0.020, p = .036) showed that the more
recent the interventions were, the larger (i.e., more negative) the effect size was. As to the quality
analysis index, the average effect size was significant for all levels (QA-0 = -1.05, p < .001; QA-
3 = -1.07, p < .01; QA-5 = 1.95, p < .01), although the QA-5 group showed a significantly larger
effect size than both the QA-0 group (estimated difference = -0.90, p < .05) and the QA-3 group
(estimated difference = -0.88, p < .05). No significant differences were found between the QA-3
and the QA-0.
Subsequently, we performed a mixed effects multi-level meta-analysis with both
moderators. The publication year was found to be only marginally significant (-0.021, p < 0.1),
thus suggesting that the previously observed moderating effect of this variable was at least
partially confounded with the moderating effect of the quality analysis index. The average effect
size was significant for all levels of the quality analysis index (QA-0 = -1.17, p < .01; QA-3 = -
0.93, p < .01; QA-5 = -1.94, p < .01), which corresponded to percentage decreases in atypical
vocalizations of 69%, 95% CI: [46%, 82%] for the QA-0 group; 61%, 95% CI: [42%, 73%] for
the QA-3 group; and 86%, 95% CI: [76%, 92%] for the QA-5 group. Again, the QA- 5 showed a
significantly larger effect size than both the QA-0 (estimated difference = -0.78, p < .01) and the
Q-3 groups (estimated difference = -1.01, p < .01), and no significant difference was found
between these last two.
Finally, while the robust within-study variance estimator remained almost equal (ω2 =
0.002), the robust between-study variance estimator changed to τ2 = 0.138, thus indicating that
both moderators accounted for the 55% of the between-study heterogeneity. However, the test
FBA-BASED INTERVENTIONS ON ATYPICAL VOCALIZATIONS 16
for residual heterogeneity was still significant (p < .001), thus pointing at the possible influence
of other variables not considered in our model on the FBA-intervention effectiveness.
Discussion
After analyzing the results, it can be concluded that all the included cases of FBA-based
interventions for atypical vocalizations have proven to be effective in reducing these behavioral
problems. In addition, in many studies the occurrence of appropriate verbal behavior also
increased, even though it was not always the main objective of the interventions. However, this
last effect was not always observed and it was highly variable.
Regarding the results of the meta-analysis, the FBA-based interventions on atypical
vocalizations show a high degree of behavioral change, with associated percentage decreases of
problem behavior ranging from 62% to 79%. This suggests that the functional analysis of
behavior is a reliable assessment tool to guide the treatment of atypical vocalizations and
consequently achieve significant clinical changes.
Furthermore, as the results of our mixed-effects multilevel meta-analysis suggest, this
effectiveness might be independent of person-related variables (i.e., gender, age), diagnosis-
related variables (i.e., problem behavior morphology, diagnosis and nature of the diagnosis) and
intervention-related variables (i.e., type of FBA and behavior modification technique used). This
could be due to the core characteristic of this kind of intervention: its idiosyncratic adaptation to
the contingencies of the person's behavior regardless of its morphology, its related diagnosis or
its developmental nature. Therefore, as shown by Hurl et al. (2016), considering the functional
aspect of a certain problem behavior, regardless of its allegedly bizarre morphology, could be a
key therapeutic tool to enhance the therapeutic power of our intervention.
FBA-BASED INTERVENTIONS ON ATYPICAL VOCALIZATIONS 17
However, the absence of a significant difference in the effect size across the different
FBA methods seems to be somewhat counterintuitive; it would be expected that interventions
based on mixed or experimental FBA methods would be able to detect the environmental
controlling variables more precisely and, consequently, modify problem behaviors more
effectively (Hurl et al., 2016). This could mean that even indirect functional assessment
techniques are precise enough to establish the environmental contingencies of these problem
behaviors. However, it could also be due to methodological limitations (e.g., small study
sample). This should be further addressed by future research on this topic.
On the contrary, we found significant differences due to both the publication year and the
quality analysis index. As abovementioned, the quality analysis index assesses both the fit of the
case intervention methodology to the WWC standards and the estimated strength of the evidence
of a causal relation (Kratochwill et al. 2010). Given that both the QA-3 and the QA-5 groups
indicated moderate evidence of a causal effect and that only QA-5 differed significantly from Q-
0, it seems that the actual moderating effect of the quality analysis index lies at its measure of the
methodological quality; in other words, case interventions show a larger effect size when the
quality of their methodological design is better. This suggests that a good methodological design
is needed in order to better appreciate the effectiveness of the intervention. On the other hand,
when combined, the moderating effect of the publication year was at least partially confounded
with the moderating effect of the quality analysis index. This suggest that there is a positive time
trend towards the enhancement of the methodological quality of the FBA-interventions on
atypical vocalizations.
However, this study has obvious methodological limitations that compel us to be cautious
when interpreting the results. Firstly, it is not exempt from the characteristic biases of any meta-
FBA-BASED INTERVENTIONS ON ATYPICAL VOCALIZATIONS 18
analysis. Publication bias, for example, could be the reason why only cases with positive results
have been included. We have tried to control for this bias by including searches in the gray
literature. However, none of the studies found with this resource met our searching criteria.
Secondly, although our intervention sample closely approached the 5-3-20 WWC criterion to
perform a quantitative synthesis of SCD studies, it still remained small. To account for this
potential source of bias, we included small-sample corrections in our meta-analysis. However,
our conclusions would be better-informed with a larger study sample with better methodological
designs. Thirdly, the amount of residual heterogeneity of our mixed effects multilevel model was
still high and significant. Future research should consider other potential moderators of the size
effect in order to account for the unexplained variance. Finally, it would be very interesting to
compare FBA-based interventions with non-FBA-based interventions on atypical vocalizations,
in order to determine whether significant therapeutic differences arise.
Despite these limitations, this study is the first to quantitatively synthesize the results of
SCD studies of FBA-based interventions for atypical vocalizations, and we hope that its results
will be of help to other mental health practitioners when choosing the appropriate evaluation
methods to assess this kind of psychological problems. Overall, our analyses suggest that the
FBA might be an effective and efficient method to guide an intervention for the treatment of
atypical vocalizations. Furthermore, we believe that this might be interesting to consider in view
of the recent debate on the nature and etiology of these phenomena (Deacon & McKay, 2015;
Rosernfarb, 2013), since it suggests that behaviors traditionally related to severe and enduring
mental illnesses, such as delusions, hallucinations or disorganized speech, could be dependent on
environmental contingencies and therefore modifiable through their manipulation. If so, any
given intervention on this kind of problems should always take the environmental contingencies
FBA-BASED INTERVENTIONS ON ATYPICAL VOCALIZATIONS 19
into account, regardless of their alleged neurological etiology. The fact that interventions
designed from a medical model do not perform a functional assessment of these problems could
partially explain why they tend to become chronic. Perhaps, we should start to pay more
attention to the functional role of these behaviors in the lives of the people who present them.
FBA-BASED INTERVENTIONS ON ATYPICAL VOCALIZATIONS 20
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FBA-based interventions on atypical vocalizations
28
Table 1
Participants, setting and study characteristics
Included Cases
n (%)
13 (54.1)
11 (45.8)
6 (25)
17 (70.8)
1 (4.1)
1 (4.1)
2 (8.3)
1 (4.1)
7 (29.1)
1 (4.1)
10 (41.1)
2 (8.3)
4 (16.6)
5 (20.8)
5 (20.8)
FBA-BASED INTERVENTIONS ON ATYPICAL VOCALIZATIONS 29
10 (41.1)
3 (12,5)
10 (41.1)
6 (25)
5 (20.8)
14 (58,33)
1 (4.1)
2 (8.3)
6 (25)
1 (4.1)
15 (62.5)
4 (16.7)
2 (8.3)
2 (8.3)
1 (4.2)
Notes. Intervention technique: DR (+ Ex) = differential reinforcing with or without
extinction; NCR = non-contingent reinforcement; TO = time out; and SD = systematic
desensization.
FBA-BASED INTERVENTIONS ON ATYPICAL VOCALIZATIONS
30
Table 2
Study characteristics and intervention outcome
Study
Behavior
Problem
Function
Quality
Index1
Age
Diagnosis
FBA
FBA-based
intervention2
Problem
behavior
reduction (%)
Appropriate
behavior
increase (%)
Alumbaugh (1971)
H
CC
0
53
None
IND
SD
*
*
Anderson & Alpert
(1974)
H
Attention
0
26
SCHZ
DES
DRO
50.1
*
Arntzen, Tonnessen,
& Brouwer (2006)
D/DS
Attention
0
44
Multiple
IND
/EX
DRA/
Extinction
47.8
543.8
Ayllon & Haughton
(1964)
D
Attention
0
47
SCHZ
EX
DRA/
Extinction
60.4
237.1
Ayllon & Michael
(1959)
D
Attention
0
*
SCHZ
IND
DRA/
Extinction
*
*
Carr & Britton
(1999)
DS
Attention
0
32
MID
IND
/EX
NCR
59.7
*
FBA-BASED INTERVENTIONS ON ATYPICAL VOCALIZATIONS 31
Davis et al. (1976)
D/H
Attention
0
33
SCHZ
IND
TO/
Instructions
62.9
*
DeLeon et al. (2003)
DS
Attention
5
21
Multiple
EX
DRA/
Extinction
89.5
*
Dixon, Benedict, &
Larson (2001)
D/H
Attention
3
25
Multiple
EX
DRA/
Extinction
56.1
268.5
Haynes & Geddy
(1973)
H
*
0
45
SCHZ
DES
TO
37.5
*
Horner, Albin, &
Mank (1989)
DS
Attention
3
26
SID
IND
/EX
DRA/
Extinction
47.4
12.1
Jimenez et al. (1996)
H
Escape
0
49
SCHZ
DES
DRO
87.4
*
Lancaster et al.
(2004)
Participant 1
D/H
Attention
3
56
Multiple
EX
NCR
69.2
206.9
Participant 2
D/H
Attention
3
53
Multiple
EX
NCR
61.9
-42.8
FBA-BASED INTERVENTIONS ON ATYPICAL VOCALIZATIONS 32
Mace & Lalli (1991)
D/H
Escape/
Attention
5
46
MID
EX/
DES
NCR
85.4
*
Mace et al. (1988)
D/H
Escape/
Attention
5
29
Multiple
EX
DRA/
Extinction
78.1
112.3
McDonough,
Johnson, & Waters
(2017)
D
Escape/
Attention
0
45
Multiple
IND
/DE
S
DRA/
Extinction
91.1
*
Nydegger (1972)
D/H
Escape/
CC
5
20
SCHZ
IND
DRA/SD
*
*
Rehfeldt &
Chambers (2003)
DS
Attention
3
23
Multiple
EX
DRA/
Extinction
63.9
144
Slade (1972)
H
CC
5
18
None
IND
SD
*
*
Travis & Sturmey
(2010)
DS
Attention
3
26
TBD
EX
DRA/
Extinction
85.1
259.6
Vandbakk et al.
(2012)
D/DS
Auto.
0
24
ASD
IND
DRA
*
*
FBA-BASED INTERVENTIONS ON ATYPICAL VOCALIZATIONS 33
Wilder et. al. (2001)
D
Attention
5
43
Multiple
EX
DRA/
Extinction
91.5
96.1
Wilder, White & Yu
(2003)
D/H
Attention
0
36
Multiple
EX
DRA/
Extinction
73.6
32.5
Notes. Behavioral problem: H = hallucination; D = delusion; DS = disorder speech. Function: CC = classical conditioning;
Auto. = autoreinforcement. Mental diagnostic: SCHZ = schizophrenia; MID = mild intellectual disorder; SID = severe intellectual
disorder; TBD = traumatic brain disorder; ASD = autism spectrum disorder. Behavioral technique: SD = systematic desensitization;
DRO = differential reinforcement of other behaviors; DRA = Differential reinforcement of alternative behavior; TO = time out and
NCR = non contingent reinforcement. 1 Single-case design quality index for the interventions on atypical vocalizations. 2 Only the
intervention techniques included in the meta-analysis were included.
FBA-BASED INTERVENTIONS ON ATYPICAL VOCALIZATIONS 34
Table 3
Summary statistics and LLR effect size estimates for atypical vocalizations of included studies
Baseline phase
Treatment phase
Effect side
Study
A
sA
n
A
sA
n
LRR
SER
Anderson & Alpert (1974)
52.310
5.786
8
25.8716
15.340
18
-0.695
0.145
Arntzen, Tonnessen, & Brouwer (2006)
20.673
5.342
7
10.814
5.897
41
-0.649
0.129
Ayllon & Haughton (1964)
77.163
27.510
20
30.196
21.548
18
-0.927
0.186
Carr & Britton (1999)
98.815
2.450
19
39.634
29.491
61
-0.909
0.095
Davis et al. (1976)
50.395
25.286
7
18.843
22.854
79
-0.992
0.233
DeLeon et al. (2003)
16.677
2.033
22
0.176
0.172
16
-2.249
0.356
Dixon, Benedict, & Larson (2001)
12.496
3.859
6
5.510
1.825
19
-0.823
0.147
Haynes & Geddy (1973)
47.258
5.843
13
29.393
13.657
22
-0.470
0.104
Horner, Albin, & Mank (1989)
1.6482
0.206
10
0.864
0.121
11
-0.641
0.149
Jimenez et al. (1996)
14.772
9.547
8
1.864
2.019
23
-2.07
0.321
Lancaster et. al. (2004)
Participant 1
49.262
6.985
9
15.069
6.754
12
-1.177
0.137
Participant 2
80.951
15.416
8
30.876
15.594
10
-0.953
0.173
FBA-BASED INTERVENTIONS ON ATYPICAL VOCALIZATIONS 35
Mace & Lalli (1991)
22.893
12.196
38
3.271
4.995
50
-1.926
0.232
Mace et al. (1988)
4.145
0.913
15
0.904
0.601
53
-1.520
0.107
McDonough, Johnson, & Waters (2017)
51.514
19.084
11
4.113
9.331
20
-2.420
0.484
Rehfeldt & Chambers (2003)
27.518
10.062
11
9.871
7.055
20
-1.018
0.194
Travis & Sturmey (2010)
1.445
0.175
8
0.209
0.157
9
-1.902
0.253
Wilder et al. (2001)
31.773
25.106
11
2.555
4.622
20
-2.466
0.469
Wilder, White, & Yu (2003)
15.545
11.653
9
4.083
3.823
22
-1.331
0.263
FBA-BASED INTERVENTIONS ON ATYPICAL VOCALIZATIONS 36
Table 4
Summary results of the meta-analysis
Studies
Cases
Est.
SE (Est.)
d.f.
95% CI
% reduction
τ
ω2
Model 1
0.309
0.001
Overall average
18
19
-1.26
0.142
16.6
[-0.959, -1.56]
[-61.672, -78.986]
Model 2
0.138
0.002
Publication year
18
19
-.0208
0.0102
7.00
[0.00325, -0.0448]
QA 0
9
9
-1.1705
0.2216
5.56
[-0.61788, -1.7232]
[-46.091, -82.151]
QA 3
5
6
-0.9327
0.1454
4.33
[-0.54080, -1.3245]
[-41.772, -73.406]
QA 5
4
4
-1.9474
0.1501
2.69
[-1.43744, -2.4573]
[-76.246, -91.433]
FBA-BASED INTERVENTIONS ON ATYPICAL VOCALIZATIONS
37
Figure 1. Flux diagram.
Screening
Included
Eligibility
Identification
Additional records identified
through other sources
(n = 6)
Records after duplicates removed
(n = 213)
Records screened
(n = 213)
Records excluded:
(<18 = 47)
(Language = 2)
(Not found = 4)
Full-text articles
assessed for eligibility
(n = 160)
Full-text articles excluded:
(No behavior problem = 12)
(No FBA = 14)
(No intervention = 4)
(No SCD = 107)
Studies included in
qualitative synthesis
(n = 23)
Studies included in
quantitative synthesis
(n = 18)
Records identified through
database searching
(n = 271)
FBA-BASED INTERVENTIONS ON ATYPICAL VOCALIZATIONS
38
Figure 2. Results of the random effects multilevel meta-analysis.
... or the idea that the same observed patterns of behavioral, inferential, and phenomenological activity can be realized via different causal processes in different species, individuals, or even moments of time for a given individual. As we'll see in more detail in the next chapter, functional analytic interventions with people with delusions based on a Functional Behavioral Assessment (hence FBA) provide empirical evidence for this in the clinical field (see Froján-Parga et al., 2019). These approaches have consistently shown that topographically similar patterns of verbal behavior (e.g., those related to the same type of delusions) may be maintained by different environmental contingencies in different people (e.g., contingencies of positive reinforcement, negative reinforcement, Pavlovian conditioning, etc.) or even different moments in time. ...
... Consider Green's example again. Imagine that after conducting a functional assessment of Green's claims about the vengeful Karmic force extorting him, we find out that it's primarily maintained by others' attention -the most common positive reinforcer found in the studies reviewed in Froján-Parga et al. (2019). If that were so, then initiating a collaborative reason-giving exchange to test the truth or coherence of Green's thoughts (see Alford & Beck, 1994), might not constitute the best intervention strategy (provided that the intervention goal were "problem reduction", which might not always be the case; see Chapter 8, section 8.3.). ...
... These have usually included: a) different kinds of differential reinforcement of pro-therapeutic behaviors -e.g., differential reinforcement of alternative (DRA), other (DRO), or incompatible responses (DRI), or low rates of response (DRL)-, often combined with the extinction of target behaviors (including escape prevention in the case of behaviors maintained by negative reinforcement) (Anderson & Alpert, 1974;Wilder et al., 2001Wilder et al., , 2003; b) non-contingent reinforcement (Carr & Britton, 1999;Lancaster et al., 2004;Mace & Lalli, 1991); and c) mild negative punishment procedures, such as time-out techniques (Davis et al., 1976;Haynes & Geddy, 1973). On the other hand, systematic desensitization has been the most commonly employed classical conditioning technique when psychotic experiences were hypothesized to be maintained by Pavlovian conditioning (Alumbaugh, 1971;Nydegger, 1972;Slade, 1972) (see also Froján-Parga et al., 2019;Wilder et al., 2020;Wong, 2006) 62 . ...
Thesis
Full-text available
Conceptual debates in the field of mental health have typically revolved around two core issues: the problem of mind and the problem of normativity. Against the reductivist and eliminativist tendencies that characterize most therapeutic models, in this dissertation we advance a pragmatist and non-descriptivist approach to mental health -a “philosophy of mental health without mirrors”. This approach rejects the idea that folk-psychological interpretation subserves a primarily descriptive and causal-explanatory function. Rather, it highlights its evaluative and regulative dimensions, while at the same time retaining their truth-aptness. In doing so, it offers a non-reductivist, yet compatibilist approach to the mind and normativity, which affords a better conceptual framework for mental health. We then explore its consequences for the debate around the doxastic status of delusional experiences and its implications for the intervention with people with delusions. Drawing from this non-descriptivist approach, we claim that doxasticism about delusions can and must be defended not on the grounds of its scientific value, but on the grounds of its ethical and political virtues. We conclude that non-cognitivist, functional-analytic approaches to the intervention with people with delusions offer a better model than their cognitivist counterparts, and we point out several ways in which our non-descriptivist approach could help to enhance their efficacy and clinical significance.
... Al mismo tiempo, creó una prisión epistémica inintencionada que impedía palpablemente el progreso científico (…) Esto comenzó a ser fuente de una preocupación real para mí, como director de la institución, yo podía estar apoyando el gasto de largas sumas de dinero de los contribuyentes para proyectos clínicos y traslacionales que casi nunca cuestionaban las categorías diagnósticas a pesar de que éstas carecían de validez (…) Los efectos problemáticos de la reificación diagnósticas se observaron repetidamente en estudios genéticos, estudios de imágenes cerebrales, ensayos cínicos y todos los estudios en los que los rígidos, operacionalizados criterios del DSM-IV definían los objetivos de la investigación a pesar del hecho de que estos aparentemente son paupérrimos reflejos de la realidad." (Hyman, 2010, p. 157-158) Por otro lado, hay evidencias empíricas que indican que una misma forma de comportamiento puede estar mantenida por diferentes variables (p.ej., Beavers et al., 2013;Froján-Parga et al., 2019;Hanley, 2012;Michael et al., 2011). Estos datos implican que ninguna agrupación basada en las topografías de comportamiento va a ser útil para identificar las causas de ese comportamiento ni para planificar el tratamiento de esos problemas. ...
... Por último, los problemas relacionados con la aparición de topografías de conducta no deseables en la comunidad implican la aparición de comportamientos que dificultan el funcionamiento de esta persona en sociedad. Dentro de este tipo de conductas podríamos englobar a las alucinaciones y delirios 6 relacionados con los diagnósticos de trastorno mental grave (p.ej., esquizofrenia y trastornos psicóticos relacionados) (Dixon et al., 2001;Froján-Parga et al., 2019;Rosenfarb, 2013). ...
Thesis
Full-text available
Psychological interventions are effective in the treatment of people diagnosed with severe mental disorder (SMI). The empirical evidence to determine the efficacy of treatments has been generated in the evidence-based practice in psychology movement. Thanks to this movement, several treatments have been shown to be effective in solving the psychological problems related to SMI diagnoses (schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression, and borderline personality disorder). While there is agreement on the efficacy of various treatments for these problems, no consensus has been reached on the basic psychological principles and processes that explain the efficacy of the treatments. Knowing that something works does not imply knowing why it works. In this context, this work endorses the usefulness of a process research with a functional-analytical perspective of human behavior. Specifically, as in Clinical Behavior Analysis, this work shares the interest in the study of the processes involved in the verbal control of behavior. The purpose of this work is to analyze the verbal interaction between therapists and clients diagnosed with severe mental disorder. For this, an observational system for analyzing the verbal interaction between the therapist and the client has been designed, refined, and validated. This system is based on a functional analytical perspective of verbal behavior, so all its categories are based on a functional description. This system facilitates the analysis of the learning processes that are set in motion in the verbal interaction during clinical session. In fact, this work analyzes the allocation of the different functions of verbal behavior of various therapists throughout different cases (6 therapists in 12 different cases with 76 sessions in total). Specifically, the performance of the therapists of two groups (cases with SMI and without SMI) at different times (36 evaluation sessions and 40 treatment sessions) is described. Also, a sequential analysis of the verbal interaction was carried out and the therapist’s performance patterns that are related to a greater size of the effect of the psychological intervention on the client's behavior were analyzed. To conclude, we analyze the performance of a therapist with training in behavior analysis in the psychological treatment of a person diagnosed with SMI (16 sessions in total). In this case, a descriptive and sequential analysis of the therapist’s performance is also carried out and her performance is related to the change in the client's behavior. In general, these studies have allowed us to study the processes of verbal control of behavior that operate during psychological treatments. Also, the role of the therapist's verbal behavior in the efficacy of psychological treatments is discussed.
... Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and metacognitive therapy both have shown moderate beneficial effects for positive symptoms, although no significant effects for negative symptoms 284 . Func tional behavioral assessmentbased interventions appear to be effective for disorganization symptoms across disorders 285 . ...
... Social skills training is efficacious for both de tachment symptoms and traits, and emerging evidence suggests that antipsychotics may be efficacious for trait psychoticism as well as frank psychosis. Much less is known about treatment for lowerorder dimensions, although social skills training may be particularly efficacious for avolition 293 , and functional behavioral assessmentbased interventions for disorganization 285 . ...
Article
The Hierarchical Taxonomy of Psychopathology (HiTOP) is a scientific effort to address shortcomings of traditional mental disorder diagnoses, which suffer from arbitrary boundaries between psychopathology and normality, frequent disorder co‐occurrence, heterogeneity within disorders, and diagnostic instability. This paper synthesizes evidence on the validity and utility of the thought disorder and detachment spectra of HiTOP. These spectra are composed of symptoms and maladaptive traits currently subsumed within schizophrenia, other psychotic disorders, and schizotypal, paranoid and schizoid personality disorders. Thought disorder ranges from normal reality testing, to maladaptive trait psychoticism, to hallucinations and delusions. Detachment ranges from introversion, to maladaptive detachment, to blunted affect and avolition. Extensive evidence supports the validity of thought disorder and detachment spectra, as each spectrum reflects common genetics, environmental risk factors, childhood antecedents, cognitive abnormalities, neural alterations, biomarkers, and treatment response. Some of these characteristics are specific to one spectrum and others are shared, suggesting the existence of an overarching psychosis superspectrum. Further research is needed to extend this model, such as clarifying whether mania and dissociation belong to thought disorder, and explicating processes that drive development of the spectra and their subdimensions. Compared to traditional diagnoses, the thought disorder and detachment spectra demonstrated substantially improved utility: greater reliability, larger explanatory and predictive power, and higher acceptability to clinicians. Validated measures are available to implement the system in practice. The more informative, reliable and valid characterization of psychosis‐related psychopathology offered by HiTOP can make diagnosis more useful for research and clinical care.
... Por ejemplo, las conductas-objetivo en las que un participante concreto tiene menores niveles de correspondencia antes de terapia son también las mismas en las que exhibe menores niveles de correspondencia después de la terapia, pero distintas de aquellas en las que obtienen menores niveles de correspondencia antes y después de terapia el resto de los participantes. Lo anterior se relaciona con lo defendido por la terapia basada en el análisis funcional, que recalca un aspecto comúnmente observado en la práctica clínica: el hecho de que, al margen de cualquier etiqueta diagnóstica, las conductas -problemáticas o no-e historia de aprendizaje de cada persona son únicas y deben ser analizadas para cada caso concreto (Froján-Parga et al., 2019;Hurl et al., 2016). Por otro, apunta a la necesidad de establecer, mediante una evaluación previa, cuáles son las conductas-objetivo potencialmente relevantes a la hora de analizar la correspondencia D-H-R. ...
Article
Full-text available
El suicidio en jóvenes es una problemática que ha ido en aumento tanto a nivel mundial como en nuestro país durante los últimos años. Dentro de la población universitaria se ha presentado un incremento considerable de muertes por suicidio a partir de lo cual es necesario desarrollar medidas preventivas para evitar esta conducta, así como guías que permitan implementar acciones específicas a partir de las cuales intervenir de manera eficaz y oportuna ante esta problemática en los jóvenes. Este trabajo tiene como objetivo describir las guías de prevención, intervención y posvención ante la conducta suicida basados en tratamientos breves que se diseñaron e implementaron en un programa de atención a universitarios con depresión y riesgo de suicidio en una institución pública de educación superior en la Ciudad de México.
... Por ejemplo, las conductas-objetivo en las que un participante concreto tiene menores niveles de correspondencia antes de terapia son también las mismas en las que exhibe menores niveles de correspondencia después de la terapia, pero distintas de aquellas en las que obtienen menores niveles de correspondencia antes y después de terapia el resto de los participantes. Lo anterior se relaciona con lo defendido por la terapia basada en el análisis funcional, que recalca un aspecto comúnmente observado en la práctica clínica: el hecho de que, al margen de cualquier etiqueta diagnóstica, las conductas -problemáticas o no-e historia de aprendizaje de cada persona son únicas y deben ser analizadas para cada caso concreto (Froján-Parga et al., 2019;Hurl et al., 2016). Por otro, apunta a la necesidad de establecer, mediante una evaluación previa, cuáles son las conductas-objetivo potencialmente relevantes a la hora de analizar la correspondencia D-H-R. ...
Article
Full-text available
p>Los terapeutas comúnmente desean mejorar el grado de coherencia entre lo que los clientes dicen que harán, lo que hacen y lo que reportan haber hecho después. Esta descripción de la práctica clínica se asemeja a los experimentos realizados en el ámbito de la correspondencia Decir-Hacer-Reportar (D-H-R). Sin embargo, la investigación sobre la correspondencia en entornos aplicados, naturales y/o ecológicos es escasa. El objetivo principal de este trabajo fue establecer una tarea que nos permitiera evaluar la correspondencia D-H-R en un entorno más ecológico (el contexto terapéutico), además de investigar cómo afecta la terapia a la correspondencia. Se analizó individualmente la evolución PRE-POST de la correspondencia en dos grupos, experimental (terapia) y control (no terapia), para tres grupos de conductas-objetivo (Beber, Comer y Actividades). La tarea experimental demostró ser apropiada para evaluar la correspondencia en un entorno más ecológico. Los resultados sobre el efecto de la terapia en la correspondencia no fueron concluyentes. Sin embargo, los diferentes estudios de interacción verbal que ocurren a lo largo de la terapia y de conducta gobernada por reglas apuntan a que uno de los procesos clave que subyacen al resultado clínico exitoso es el refuerzo sistemático de la correspondencia. </p
Chapter
This chapter reviews assessment for treatment, that is, assessment that is conducted prior to treatment of aggression and violence to guide the decision about what kind of treatment is best for each individual. The two approaches reviewed here are functional assessment and analysis and case formulation, including forensic case formulation. Functional assessment methods include indirect methods such as interviews and questionnaires, and naturalistic observation to identify target behaviors and their potential antecedents and consequences. Indirect approaches are limited because they do not manipulate the environment, and hence, the observations may include confounds. Experimental analyses involve direct and systematic manipulation of the environment to discover functional relationships between the environment and aggressive or violent behavior. Experimental analyses may be conducted on less dangerous forms of behavior when it would be unethical or impractical to conduct functional analyses of aggression and violence. Over time, research has developed briefer and potentially more efficient forms of functional analyses that can be used more readily in typical service settings. Case formulation similarly involves pretreatment assessment and typically uses indirect methods such as case record reviews, interviews, and client self-reports. Case formulation has been used extensively in the clinical assessment of aggression and violence, including the more severe forms of violence seen in forensic services. Case formulation sometimes uses concepts from functional assessment and analysis and may be integrated into risk assessment. One challenging area for both the approaches is training routine practitioners to conduct and use pretreatment assessments effectively and efficiently.KeywordsAggressionViolenceFunctional assessmentFunctional analysisIndirect methodsDirect methodsAntecedentsConsequencesIISCACase formulationForensic case formulationRisk assessment
Chapter
This chapter frames functional assessment as a broad class of methods for understanding challenging behavior and mental health disorders. We outline how various researchers define this group of methods in the literature and review theoretical and applied rationale for these methods. The specific type of functional assessment protocol used and its application will often need to vary in line with a number of factors, such as (a) the nature of the challenging behavior, (b) population studied, (c) who does the assessment, and (c) where the assessment occurs. Various studies will be described to exemplify the varying types, applications, and rationale for the use of different functional assessment methods. Functional assessment is a foundational aspect of contemporary interventions for supporting individuals with challenging behaviors and mental health disorders. Practitioners working with such individuals therefore require the competences necessary to implement functional assessments and interpret the resulting assessment data.
Preprint
This is a pre-print of this manuscript and is currently under-review. Students with developmental disabilities frequently present with both limited vocal speech and challenging behavior. Functional communication training (FCT) with augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) supports, is a commonly recommended intervention to reduce challenging behavior for these students, while also increasing appropriate communication. Current research on this topic has not applied multiple evaluation tools, despite the recent suggestion to do so. Further, there are limited studies that have (a) applied multiple evaluation tools and (b) compared the results of the tools. In the current review, we applied three evaluation tools to intervention studies examining the use of FCT with AAC supports in school-based settings to determine the current level of scientific support for this intervention. We identified 38 studies, which contained 59 single-case designs (SCDs). Next, we compared the methodological rigor and/or quality, outcome scores, and Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) ratings provided by the three evaluation tools. Our results yielded inconsistent methodological rigor and/or quality, participant outcome measures, and EBP classifications between the evaluation tools. No two evaluation tools completely aligned. Limitations and future research are discussed.
Article
Full-text available
Differential reinforcement for alternative behaviors and extinction for bizarre speech were used as a behavior intervention protocol for a 45-year-old woman living in a residential group-home setting. A functional behavior assessment consisting of behavioral interviews and direct observation suggested bizarre speech was maintained by attention from staff. Partial interval recording method was used to assess percentage of intervals engaged in the target behavior. Results showed a decrease in intervals engaged in bizarre speech from baseline (52%) to follow-up (4%).
Article
Noncontingent reinforcement (NCR) was used to treat the attention‐maintained problematic speech of an adult male diagnosed with moderate mental retardation. A series of functional assessments was conducted that included informant interviews and a brief experimental analysis. A multiple‐baseline design was then used to assess the effects of NCR across two different therapists. Although the target behavior was substantially decreased from baseline levels, the reduction was inversely related to the density of the NCR schedule. Within‐session analyses were then used to hypothesize putative behavior‐change mechanisms responsible for the reduction. The results are discussed in relation to the active components underlying the effects of NCR. Copyright © 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Article
Methods for meta-analyzing single-case designs (SCDs) are needed to inform evidence-based practice in clinical and school settings and to draw broader and more defensible generalizations in areas where SCDs comprise a large part of the research base. The most widely used outcomes in single-case research are measures of behavior collected using systematic direct observation, which typically take the form of rates or proportions. For studies that use such measures, one simple and intuitive way to quantify effect sizes is in terms of proportionate change from baseline, using an effect size known as the log response ratio. This paper describes methods for estimating log response ratios and combining the estimates using meta-analysis. The methods are based on a simple model for comparing two phases, where the level of the outcome is stable within each phase and the repeated outcome measurements are independent. Although auto-correlation will lead to biased estimates of the sampling variance of the effect size, meta-analysis of response ratios can be conducted with robust variance estimation procedures that remain valid even when sampling variance estimates are biased. The methods are demonstrated using data from a recent meta-analysis on group contingency interventions for student problem behavior.
Article
Varying methods for evaluating the outcomes of single case research designs (SCD) are currently used in reviews and meta-analyses of interventions. Quantitative effect size measures are often presented alongside visual analysis conclusions. Six measures across two classes-overlap measures (percentage non-overlapping data, improvement rate difference, and Tau) and parametric within-case effect sizes (standardized mean difference and log response ratio [increasing and decreasing])-were compared to determine if choice of synthesis method within and across classes impacts conclusions regarding effectiveness. The effectiveness of sensory-based interventions (SBI), a commonly used class of treatments for young children, was evaluated. Separately from evaluations of rigor and quality, authors evaluated behavior change between baseline and SBI conditions. SBI were unlikely to result in positive behavior change across all measures except IRD. However, subgroup analyses resulted in variable conclusions, indicating that the choice of measures for SCD meta-analyses can impact conclusions. Suggestions for using the log response ratio in SCD meta-analyses and considerations for understanding variability in SCD meta-analysis conclusions are discussed.
Article
Tools for evaluating the quality and rigor of single case research designs (SCD) are often used when conducting SCD syntheses. Preferred components include evaluations of design features related to the internal validity of SCD to obtain quality and/or rigor ratings. Three tools for evaluating the quality and rigor of SCD (Council for Exceptional Children, What Works Clearinghouse, and Single-Case Analysis and Design Framework) were compared to determine if conclusions regarding the effectiveness of antecedent sensory-based interventions for young children changed based on choice of quality evaluation tool. Evaluation of SCD quality differed across tools, suggesting selection of quality evaluation tools impacts evaluation findings. Suggestions for selecting an appropriate quality and rigor assessment tool are provided and across-tool conclusions are drawn regarding the quality and rigor of studies. Finally, authors provide guidance for using quality evaluations in conjunction with outcome analyses when conducting syntheses of interventions evaluated in the context of SCD.
Chapter
Mike GallagerHow should we Proceed?StructuralismFunctionalismMr Gallager Revisited
Article
This systematic review investigated one systematic approach to designing, implementing, and evaluating functional assessment–based interventions (FABI) for use in supporting school-age students with or at-risk for high-incidence disabilities. We field tested several recently developed methods for single-case design syntheses. First, we appraised the quality of individual studies and the overall body of work using Council for Exceptional Children’s standards. Next, we calculated and meta-analyzed within-case and between-case effect sizes. Results indicated that studies were of high methodological quality, with nine studies identified as being methodologically sound and demonstrating positive outcomes across 14 participants. However, insufficient evidence was available to classify the evidence base for FABIs due to small number of participants within (fewer than recommended three) and across (fewer than recommended 20) studies. Nonetheless, average within-case effect sizes were equivalent to increases of 118% between baseline and intervention phases. Finally, potential moderating variables were examined. Limitations and future directions are discussed.
Article
Background Negative symptoms observed in patients with psychotic disorders undermine quality of life and functioning. Antipsychotic medications have a limited impact. Psychological and psychosocial interventions, with medication, are recommended. However, evidence for the effectiveness of specific non-biological interventions warrants detailed examination.AimsTo conduct a meta-analytic and systematic review of the literature on the effectiveness of non-biological treatments for negative symptoms in psychotic disorders.Method We searched for randomised controlled studies of psychological and psychosocial interventions in psychotic disorders that reported outcome on negative symptoms. Standardised mean differences (SMDs) in values of negative symptoms at the end of treatment were calculated across study domains as the main outcome measure.ResultsA total of 95 studies met our criteria and 72 had complete quantitative data. Compared with treatment as usual cognitive-behavioural therapy (pooled SMD -0.34, 95% CI -0.55 to -0.12), skills-based training (pooled SMD -0.44, 95% CI -0.77 to -0.10), exercise (pooled SMD -0.36, 95% CI -0.71 to -0.01), and music treatments (pooled SMD -0.58, 95% CI -0.82 to -0.33) provide significant benefit. Integrated treatment models are effective for early psychosis (SMD -0.38, 95% CI -0.53 to -0.22) as long as the patients remain in treatment. Overall quality of evidence was moderate with a high level of heterogeneity.Conclusions Specific psychological and psychosocial interventions have utility in ameliorating negative symptoms in psychosis and should be included in the treatment of negative symptoms. However, more effective treatments for negative symptoms need to be developed.