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Common Musculoskeletal Injuries Sustained in an Uncommon Sport: Assessment of Injuries at the Gaelic Games North American Championships

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  • International University of Health Science

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Most sports are recognizable, and to most orthopedists or sports medicine specialists, the mechanisms of injury and possible sequelae of such sports injuries are well researched, recognized, and understood. However, what if a patient presented with an injury that occurred while they were participating in the Gaelic Games or playing or practicing Gaelic football or hurling? Any injury resulting from such would likely be less researched, recognized, and understood. The Gaelic Games consist of competitions in Gaelic football, hurling, camogie, and handball. They are physically demanding, rugged, and contact-intense sports played, for the most part, without the benefit of protective padding. Each Gaelic sport, being a mix of other more recognized sports, can present its own set of injuries and challenges in how to diagnose, treat, and prevent them. Although the roots of the Gaelic Games are from ancient times, the Gaelic sports and competitions are growing in popularity and participation globally, among men, women, young adults, and children. The following study takes a look at the injuries that were noted and treated at the 2016 North American Gaelic games held in Seattle, Washington, USA. There is relatively little medical research on these sports, thus this study attempts to assess the incidence and types of injuries commonly sustained during such competitions so the orthopedist, sports medicine specialist, and health care provider may become more familiar with, and better diagnose and treat, such: and researchers, trainers, and coaches can better prepare their players and prevent or minimize injuries.
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