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Abstract

Gamification is a new, rapidly growing trend impacting many areas of business such as learning and marketing. It has also been predicted to revolutionise the process of innovating. However, there have been very few examples of gamification supporting the innovating process within the academic literature. The starting point for this thought piece is whether this prediction can ever be fulfilled. We intend to open a discussion about the ways in which gamification and innovating may intertwine and how the mindset and the toolset of gamification can support the process of innovating. In particular, we showcase and review a set of examples of gamifying innovating activities from both research and practice. Coupling this review of practice with academic evidence from innovation literature, we highlight some gaps and explore potential directions for further research.

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... This has been proven by the number of drivers under Go-Jek of 2 million partners in 2020. The Octalysis Framework promises a gamification framework that can see the use of gamification from several perspectives to increase the aspect of engagement [15]- [19] of the socio-technical environment. Since e-business with the concept of gamification is an emerging field, this research aimed to investigate the degree of closeness as a form of trust and underlying subjective norms influencing the drivers' intentions to engage. ...
... This constraint exists because games aimed at leisure or extracurricular activities often do not lend themselves well for direct implementation at work (Warmelink, 2014). Nonetheless, as demonstrated in the literature on this topic (Armstrong et al., 2016;Deterding, 2019;Shpakova et al., 2020), games and game elements, when adapted to organisational context, can play a useful role in supporting key activities as learning, innovating, or project management (Vesa, 2021). And thus, in particular, the gamified activities, tailored to the contemporary workplace, offer promising application opportunities. ...
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... Whenever we were interested in the lived experience, we did engage in some form of bracketing, which was always achieved through transpersonal reflexivity. This was true when we have worked together or with other co-authors, and even when it was just one of us, we invited someone to 'bracket with' (Dörfler, 2010;Stierand and Zizka, 2015;Baracskai and Dörfler, 2017;Bas, Dörfler, and Sinclair, 2019;Miralles, Stierand, and Dörfler, 2019;Pyrko, Dörfler, and Eden, 2019;Stierand et al., 2019;Dörfler and Bas, 2020b;Harrington, Dörfler, and Stierand, 2020;Miralles, Stierand, Lee, and Dörfler, 2020;Rayan, Dörfler, and Lennon, 2020;Shpakova, Dörfler, and MacBryde, 2020;Spanellis, Dörfler, and MacBryde, 2020;Stierand, Heelein, and Mainemelis, 2020). Why is it always transpersonal reflexivity? ...
Article
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... There are further ways to use gamification in a corporate environment. For instance, a company could create a platform where employees share their ideas and rate ideas of others, provide feedback and earn points for submitting ideas, commenting on them and suggesting improvements (Shpakova, Dörfler, & MacBryde, 2019). Such system could help identify those who are good at creating new ideas, those who are good at critically evaluating or improving the ideas (Hutter, Hautz, Füller, Mueller, & Matzler, 2011). ...
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Resumo Este estudo apresenta uma visão dessa gamificação como possibilidade de aprendizado via construção de sentido. Para tanto, adotamos a seguinte pergunta de pesquisa: como são percebidos os processos de aprendizado e a construção de sentido da gamificação como ferramenta organizacional? A partir dos relatos de seis expertises na área e por meio da análise temática, chegou-se a dois níveis de análises: a) o nível organizacional e b) o nível individual. Tais níveis foram apresentados em três dimensões: a organização, o time/a equipe e a individual do trabalhador. Foi identificada a existência de bons resultados para os níveis organizacional e individual. Assim, destaca-se na dimensão organizacional a melhoria na produtividade, na aprendizagem e nos processos de inovação e update organizacional. Na dimensão de time/equipe, notaram-se melhorias no clima organizacional, na comunicação e no trabalho colaborativo. Na dimensão individual, houve desenvolvimento do trabalhador, autonomia, autoestima e maior transparência na relação entre líderes e liderados, bem como empoderamento.
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Purpose: This exploratory paper investigates gamification as a medium for knowledge workers to interact with each other. The paper aims to open the discussion around the sus-taining impact that gamification might have on knowledge management. Design/methodology/approach: The paper employs an exploratory literature review inves-tigating the current state of the art in relation to knowledge management and gamification; this literature review serves as the starting point of subsequent theorizing. Findings: Based on the literature review we theorize that the use of gamification in knowledge management can go far beyond the motivational aspects. To name just a few uses of gamification, it can help in: supporting flexibility, facilitating transparency and therefore improving trust, visualizing skills and competences as well as generating require-ments for new competences, and promoting a collaborative environment among the knowledge workers. Research limitations/implications: This paper opens the discussion around knowledge man-agement and gamification and suggests a wide range of areas for further research. Practical implications: In this paper we argue that by looking at gamification as more than just a set of tools for improving motivation and engagement a company can address some pitfalls of a particular type of knowledge workers. Originality/value: Gamification is a new, but increasingly popular approach, which has been shown to be to be powerful in many areas. This paper is novel in that it initiates a dialogue around the impact that gamification might have on knowledge management.
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