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Class Acts: Service and Inequality in Luxury Hotels Rachel Sherman, University of California Press, Berkeley, Los Angeles, USA: 2007. ISBN: 978-0-520-24782-6

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Abstract

It is true that the last crisis of the cur- rent capitalist economic system, which has been going on since 2008, raised more pub- lic outcry globally (99% marches) compared to the time Class Acts has been published. Still, the high-end consumption that is an- alyzed by Sherman (2007) seems nowhere near disappearing and human race seems nowhere closer that “wiser age” that Stew- art mentioned. Thus, the book Class Acts: Service and Inequality in Luxury Hotels deserves a renewed attention nowadays.

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