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Understanding Teacher Reflectivity in Contemporary Times: A (Re)Review of the Literature

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Abstract

The Association of Teacher Educators Reflectivity Commission was established in 2004. This literature review updates the Commission’s work by examining 24 empirical research articles published in the Association’s national journals, The New Educator and Action in Teacher Education, since the commission’s inception. We report three contemporary trends regarding the incorporation of reflectivity in teacher education: (1) the use of diverse frameworks for reflectivity, (2) innovative pedagogical tools for reflectivity, and (3) culturally responsive reflective practices. This article defines, summarizes, and discusses each trend. We also discuss potential avenues for future work in studying and facilitating reflection.

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... Así mismo, esta se configura a través de un proceso dinámico fundamentado en las vivencias, un ejemplo de ello es la reflexión crítica (Playsted, 2019) y meditar en enfocarse menos en ellos mismos y más en los compromisos de enseñanza (Rigney et al., 2019) puesto que, no se trata de acumular habilidades y estrategias orientados a educar, sino a la comprensión y toma de decisiones de los factores que ocurren en el aula, es decir, el docente en formación pasa de novato a experto (Clark et al., 2021), por consiguiente, el saber en la acción son los saberes estudiados por el docente en formación que le permiten pensar su práctica (Schön, 1998). Sin embargo, para llegar a esto, y generar mayor asertividad y conciencia en la planeación (Fletcher et al., 2019) es fundamental que ellos desarrollen su práctica pedagógica en situaciones próximas a la realidad. ...
... Sin embargo, para llegar a esto, y generar mayor asertividad y conciencia en la planeación (Fletcher et al., 2019) es fundamental que ellos desarrollen su práctica pedagógica en situaciones próximas a la realidad. En virtud de lo expuesto, esto es posible cuando los estudiantes se centran en mejorar su quehacer (Rigney et al., 2019) y participan en las actividades propuestas por los docentes en formación. No obstante, se observa que en algunos docentes en formación existe dificultad en la evaluación de su propia práctica y de los estudiantes (Ong et al., 2021). ...
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... Because of the layered nature of author involvement in Project Linpilcare, it is important to explicate the specific role each of the authors played in this research and the generation of this case. The first author came to this research project simply as a result of a growing interest in teacher reflectivity and professional learning (Rigney, Ferland, & Dana, 2019). Having published several articles and books on practitioner inquiry, the second author was invited to deliver a one-week course on the subject early in the project's inception for consortium members by the third author, the creator of the proposal submitted to fund Linpilcare and the project leader. ...
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Reflection has become an integral part of teacher education, yet its elusive boundaries make it difficult to define and teach. Examining the various facets of reflection with respect to teaching clarifies the concept, making it more accessible to pre-service teachers learning to reflect on their practice. This article explores those facets and provides a typology designed to guide teacher educators in teaching reflection to pre-service teachers.
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This paper examines the use of peer-videoing in the classroom as a tool to promote reflective practice among student teachers. Twenty pre-service teachers from a variety of subject disciplines participating in a Post-Graduate Diploma in Education programme in an Irish university participated in the study. The practice of encouraging student teachers working in the same school to participate in structured video analysis avoids the impact of external observers whose role is largely evaluative and endorses a collaborative model that promotes dialogue and shared learning. This practice promotes a culture of observation and critical dialogue in a profession which has traditionally been characterised by isolation, while at the same time fostering and validating the voice and experience of the student teacher. Locating the discussion within the framework of the theoretical literature on reflective practice, the purpose of this paper is to contribute to the international debate over best practice in supporting, encouraging and scaffolding reflective practice. It comments on the implications of reflective dialogue for the modernisation of teacher education and offers guidelines on how best to scaffold and promote reflectivity.
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Reflection is claimed as a goal in many teacher preparation programs, but its definition and how it might be fostered in student teachers are problematic issues. In this article, a report is provided of a review of literature on reflection, in particular focusing on strategies which assist its development in preservice programs. Next there is outlined a research project where types of reflection have been defined and applied to an analysis of student writing. Finally, the authors propose a framework for types of reflection as a basis for further research development in teacher education.