PosterPDF Available

Trash Talking: Composition of and trends in trash fish in Malvan, Maharashtra

Authors:
Trawling is destructive as it catches a large
volume of non-target bycatch[1]. Traditionally
discarded, bycatch is increasingly being sold as
trash fish.
This is amix of species of low commercial value
owing to their quality or size. It is sold for various
uses like chicken and aquaculture feed[2], demand
for which is increasing[3].
While trash fishing has many benefits, it can
impact marine ecosystems and socio-economics
of fishermen[3,4]. However, little monitoring and
regulation is done.
BACKGROUND
RESULTS AND DISCUSSION
TRASH
23.6% (by weight) of a
trawler’s landed catch is
trash fish.
115 species found in the
trash, 99 of these are
commercially consumed.
Pelagic trawlers are poorly
studied in India with
respect to bycatch. Higher
quantities of trash fish in
them call for further
research on its impacts.
I thank Kartik Shanker and Naveen Namboothri for their guidance
for this work, Kabini and Manini for creative assistance, and Noun
Project for the icons.
Trisha Gupta
Shawn Dsouza
Chetan Rao
Muralidharan M
Quantity and Composition of Trash Benthic vs Pelagic Trawlers
[1] Alverson, D. L.; Freeberg, M. H.; Murawski, S. A.; Pope, J. G. A global assessment of fisheries bycatch and discards.
FAO Fish. Tech. Pap. 339
1994, 233.
[2] Funge-Smith, S.; Lindebo, E.; Staples, D. Asian fisheries today: The production and use of low value /trash fish from marine fisheries in the Asia-Pacific
region.
Rap Publ. 2005/16
2005, 47.
[3] Dineshbabu, A. P.; Radhakrishnan, E. V.; Thomas, S.; Maheswarudu, G.; Manojkumar, P. P.; Kizhakudan, S. J.; Lakshmi Pillai, S.; Chakraborty, R.; Jose, J.;
Sarada, P. T.; Sawant, P. B.; Philipose, K. K.; Deshmukh, V. D.; Jayasankar, J.; Ghosh, S.; Koya, M.; Purushottama, G. B.; Dash, G. An appraisal of trawl fisheries
of India with special reference on the changing trends in bycatch utilization.
J. Mar. Biol. Assoc. India
2014,
55
, 6978.
[4] Lobo, A. S.; Balmford, A.; Arthur, R.; Manica, A. Commercializing bycatch can push a fishery beyond economic extinction.
Conserv. Lett.
2010,
3
, 277285.
[5] Salim, S. S.; Aswathy, N.; Vipinkumar, V. P.; Geetha, R. Economic externalities of low value fishes in trawl operations in Kerala. 2014,
61
, 103107.t
REFERENCES ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Contact:
trisha@dakshin.org
Assessing the quantities and composition of trash fish
Understanding trends of trash fish with fishing gear and effort
Long-term goal: Understanding the ecological and economic impacts of trash fishing.
COMPOSITION OF AND TRENDS IN
TRASH FISH IN MALVAN, MAHARASHTRA
Harvesting commercially valuable species as juveniles for trash can have ecological implications and
livelihood impacts for fisher communities dependant on these species
Trawling has expanded from targeting high-value benthic species to a more biomass-based pelagic fishery;
this needs further research.
Understanding ecological trends and socio-economic drivers of trash fishing for better management of trawl
fisheries.
Trash fish showed no
variations with depth
or fishing location, but
its quantity varied
significantly between
benthic and pelagic
trawlers
78.9% of trash fish (by
count) is composed of
juvenile individuals.
Capture of juveniles may
compromise recruitment
of the species, which can
lead to population
declines [3], and reduce
economic returns from
fisheries in the long run
[5].
TALKING
OBJECTIVES
Fishing effort, gear, depth
and location recorded
Benthic
Pelagic
1 trawler sample/day
3 sampling days/ week
January May 2018
Total sample size n = 58
Species identified, measured
(TL and weight)
1kg randomly sampled from crates
Types of
Trawlers
Trash fish
sampling
Additional
data
CONCLUSION
VARIABLE QUANTITY
OF TRASH
PROPORTION OF
JUVENILES
Depth
Fishing location
Gear
(Benthic vs Pelagic)
Pelagic > Benthic
p << 0.001
Pelagic > Benthic
p = 0.36
Relationship of quantity of trash fish and proportion of
juveniles with different fishing variables
SAMPLING
The Study Site
MH
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any citations for this publication.
ResearchGate has not been able to resolve any references for this publication.