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The students are our future: growing the next generation of paramedic researchers in Canada.

Authors:

Abstract

As the paramedic discipline globally moves towards professionalisation through professional registration, higher education, and role diversification within the health service, the importance of the paramedic body of knowledge becomes more apparent. In this article we will outline our experiences with student paramedic research at Fanshawe College, and will expand on our previous reporting of this initiative.
1312
JUNE/JULY 2019JUNE/JULY 2019
JUNE/JULY 2019JUNE/JULY 2019
| TABLE OF CONTENTS | | TABLE OF CONTENTS |
INTRODUCTION
As the paramedic discipline globally moves towards
professionalization through professional registration,
higher education, and role diversication within the health
service, the importance of the paramedic body of knowl-
edge becomes more apparent. is new knowledge, which
is owned and directed by paramedics, helps to distinguish
the paramedic profession in its own right.(1) e role of
paramedic students’ research and inquiry in question-
ing and challenging the nature of paramedic practice is
essential to the development of the profession.(2) Today’s
students are our future paramedic leaders, educators and
researchers (3), and scholarly output by these students will
contribute to the growing paramedic body of knowledge.
(4). Several initiatives to encourage student-led research
can be identied internationally, and locally at Fanshawe
College (5), Georgian College (6), and others. ese
novice researcher however face barriers to functioning
as members of a research team. e provision of educa-
tion, mentorship, protected time, and funding have all
been previously outlined as essential to the success of
paramedic researchers (2,7–9), and research education is
an essential component in the development of paramed-
ic-led research.(10–13). Grant-Wakeeld, describing her
experience as a paramedic student undertaking research,
states her concern of being a “burden to the research
team due to lack of experience and area specic knowl-
edge”.(14) Other paramedic student researchers describe
similar experiences.(15,16) Central to the success of these
researchers were the provision of ongoing research educa-
tion and skills development, and mentoring by faculty. In
this article we will outline our experiences with student
paramedic research at Fanshawe College, and will expand
on our previous reporting of this initiative.
EDUCATION
Since 2017 rst-year PCP students at Fanshawe
College undertake a 15-week (3 hours per-week contact
time) ‘Introduction to Research Principles’ course in their
second semester. Several hours of self-directed learn-
ing activities are also provided. e course is designed
to provide exposure to 13 NOCPs at PCP level, and is
aligned to a number of key objectives. ese are related to
research principles and theories, quantitative and quali-
tative approaches, literature search and review, statistical
analyses, evidence appraisal, delivery of eective presen-
tations, and other issues related to research and scholarly
activity. is course is evaluated through the completion
of ethics training (TCPS-2 CORE), an article critique,
a critically appraised topic (CAT), and the submis-
sion of a group research proposal and ethics application.
ACP students also complete research education, and are
exposed to literature search and review, statistical analy-
ses, and evidence appraisal, which is evaluated through the
submission of a group critically appraised topic and public
presentation.
Acquiring research skills in education exposes students
to the opportunities presented by research and has
the potential to inuence the course of their profes-
sional careers. ese opportunities allow paramedics and
paramedic students to develop contemporary opinions of
the options that are available outside of (or in addition to)
the traditionally linear career progression of a paramedic
in Canada. Research also provides alternative avenues to
create a direct impact on patient’s lives outside of front
line work.
THE STUDENTS ARE OUR FUTURE:
GROWING THE NEXT GENERATION OF PARAMEDIC
RESEARCHERS IN CANADA
By: Alan M. Batt PhD(c) MSc CCP1-4, Dugg Steary MA(c) CCP5, Paige Mason BA(Hons.) PCP1,4,6, Trevor
Hines Duncliffe BA(Hons.) MA PCP1, C.William Johnston BA(Hons.) PCP 1,4,6, Brad McArthur BHSc CCP1
1. Fanshawe College, Ontario, Canada. 2. Monash University, Victoria, Australia. 3. CQUniversity, Queensland,
Australia. 4. McNally Project for Paramedicine Research, Ontario, Canada. 5. Institute of British Columbia,
B.C., Canada 6. Ottawa Paramedic Service, Ontario, Canada.
THE MCNALLY PROJECT
EXPERIENCE
During the rst semester of their second year (semes-
ter 3), PCP student groups begin the conduct of their
approved primary research studies. Continued research
support is provided through this semester. All projects are
student led, from identication of the research question,
conduct of the literature search and review, and identi-
cation of appropriate methods to collect data, to submis-
sion of ethics application, data collection and analysis, and
preparation of abstracts and manuscripts for submission.
Student groups are provided with academic oversight
by several of the authors to varying extents. Preliminary
ndings are presented at a progress research presentation
at the end of semester 3, and a draft manuscript is submit-
ted. Over the duration of the nal semester (semester 4)
students nalize data collection and analysis, and their
manuscripts. e semester culminates in the presentation
of research projects at the program research day in April
of each year. is event is open to the public, streamed live
online, and advertised across the region. Student groups
can then liaise with faculty regarding manuscript prepara-
tion and editing if they intend to pursue publication.
rough the promotion of scholarly activity related to
“real-world” practice, students undertake research and
scholarly activity that is central to professional practice.
is can stimulate important conversations about the
importance of professional practice that is based on
research. e skills acquired by students can not only
increase their appreciation for research, but also improve
their ability to appraise evidence, which can potentially
lead to improved patient care.
MENTORING AND ROLE-MODELLING
Research education in our programs is delivered by
academics with a background in paramedicine. is is not
only important for ensuring practice relevance but also
functions as a form of role-modelling for students, which
is vital in order to identify and support the next genera-
tion of paramedic researchers. Program faculty members
regularly conduct and lead research studies related to
professional and educational issues within paramedi-
cine, which provides further role-modelling behaviour
for students. Academic and scholarly achievements by
fellow students and alumni also provide students with an
important form of peer role-modelling, and demonstrate
that paramedic students can be involved in research.
ACHIEVEMENTS
Since 2017 total of 186 students (PCP and ACP) have
received formal research methods education. To date 62
paramedic student-led primary research studies, litera-
ture reviews, and CATs have been completed. Students
and faculty have been involved in scholarly activity
and primary research on topics related to paramedicine
including paramedic education, empathy, patient safety,
reective practice, wellbeing, mental health, vulnerable
populations, gender equity, and clinical topics including
trauma management, and neurological emergencies. ese
topics have been presented at conferences across Canada,
Ireland, the UK, the USA, and Australia, by both students
and faculty. A total of 34 students have authored or co-au-
thored articles that have been published in both peer-re-
viewed and non-peer-reviewed venues. In 2019, we were
honoured to host two paramedic student groups from
Georgian College as they presented their primary research
ndings at our program research day.
RATIONALE
Glenn et al. previously discussed the concept of
“hooking” rst year paramedic students with research (17),
through early involvement with research, and encourag-
ing students to discover that research is a core aspect of
evidence-based practice. Our approach to research educa-
tion in this program aims to achieve this “hook”, in partic-
ular through the design of the research course. is course
is based on three core principles (18):
1. learning is a social and interactive undertaking;
2. learning is maximized when situated in a real and
meaningful context;
3. there should be meaningful application of what has
been learned.
Paramedic students work in groups, investigate a
research topic of interest, and develop the project through
to presentation and publication. Student feedback has
demonstrated that by the end of the research education
course, many students at least appreciate the importance
of research to their practice, even if they do not intend
to continue as a researcher in the eld. Having tangible
output in the form of a presentation and potential publi-
cations at the end of the project, not merely a grade on a
transcript, gives meaning to the entire research process.
e research education course itself is continually rened
based on feedback from student cohorts, reecting the fact
that this novel approach has scope to improve, and needs
to evolve as we progress and learn from its successes and
failures.
CHALLENGES
Engaging students in a vocational, diploma-level educa-
tion program with research is not without its challenges.
Studies to date have been largely quantitative in nature,
which has resulted in a potentially fatigued target popula-
THE MCNALLY PROJECT
1312
JUNE/JULY 2019JUNE/JULY 2019
JUNE/JULY 2019JUNE/JULY 2019
| TABLE OF CONTENTS | | TABLE OF CONTENTS |
INTRODUCTION
As the paramedic discipline globally moves towards
professionalization through professional registration,
higher education, and role diversication within the health
service, the importance of the paramedic body of knowl-
edge becomes more apparent. is new knowledge, which
is owned and directed by paramedics, helps to distinguish
the paramedic profession in its own right.(1) e role of
paramedic students’ research and inquiry in question-
ing and challenging the nature of paramedic practice is
essential to the development of the profession.(2) Today’s
students are our future paramedic leaders, educators and
researchers (3), and scholarly output by these students will
contribute to the growing paramedic body of knowledge.
(4). Several initiatives to encourage student-led research
can be identied internationally, and locally at Fanshawe
College (5), Georgian College (6), and others. ese
novice researcher however face barriers to functioning
as members of a research team. e provision of educa-
tion, mentorship, protected time, and funding have all
been previously outlined as essential to the success of
paramedic researchers (2,7–9), and research education is
an essential component in the development of paramed-
ic-led research.(10–13). Grant-Wakeeld, describing her
experience as a paramedic student undertaking research,
states her concern of being a “burden to the research
team due to lack of experience and area specic knowl-
edge”.(14) Other paramedic student researchers describe
similar experiences.(15,16) Central to the success of these
researchers were the provision of ongoing research educa-
tion and skills development, and mentoring by faculty. In
this article we will outline our experiences with student
paramedic research at Fanshawe College, and will expand
on our previous reporting of this initiative.
EDUCATION
Since 2017 rst-year PCP students at Fanshawe
College undertake a 15-week (3 hours per-week contact
time) ‘Introduction to Research Principles’ course in their
second semester. Several hours of self-directed learn-
ing activities are also provided. e course is designed
to provide exposure to 13 NOCPs at PCP level, and is
aligned to a number of key objectives. ese are related to
research principles and theories, quantitative and quali-
tative approaches, literature search and review, statistical
analyses, evidence appraisal, delivery of eective presen-
tations, and other issues related to research and scholarly
activity. is course is evaluated through the completion
of ethics training (TCPS-2 CORE), an article critique,
a critically appraised topic (CAT), and the submis-
sion of a group research proposal and ethics application.
ACP students also complete research education, and are
exposed to literature search and review, statistical analy-
ses, and evidence appraisal, which is evaluated through the
submission of a group critically appraised topic and public
presentation.
Acquiring research skills in education exposes students
to the opportunities presented by research and has
the potential to inuence the course of their profes-
sional careers. ese opportunities allow paramedics and
paramedic students to develop contemporary opinions of
the options that are available outside of (or in addition to)
the traditionally linear career progression of a paramedic
in Canada. Research also provides alternative avenues to
create a direct impact on patient’s lives outside of front
line work.
THE STUDENTS ARE OUR FUTURE:
GROWING THE NEXT GENERATION OF PARAMEDIC
RESEARCHERS IN CANADA
By: Alan M. Batt PhD(c) MSc CCP1-4, Dugg Steary MA(c) CCP5, Paige Mason BA(Hons.) PCP1,4,6, Trevor
Hines Duncliffe BA(Hons.) MA PCP1, C.William Johnston BA(Hons.) PCP 1,4,6, Brad McArthur BHSc CCP1
1. Fanshawe College, Ontario, Canada. 2. Monash University, Victoria, Australia. 3. CQUniversity, Queensland,
Australia. 4. McNally Project for Paramedicine Research, Ontario, Canada. 5. Institute of British Columbia,
B.C., Canada 6. Ottawa Paramedic Service, Ontario, Canada.
THE MCNALLY PROJECT
EXPERIENCE
During the rst semester of their second year (semes-
ter 3), PCP student groups begin the conduct of their
approved primary research studies. Continued research
support is provided through this semester. All projects are
student led, from identication of the research question,
conduct of the literature search and review, and identi-
cation of appropriate methods to collect data, to submis-
sion of ethics application, data collection and analysis, and
preparation of abstracts and manuscripts for submission.
Student groups are provided with academic oversight
by several of the authors to varying extents. Preliminary
ndings are presented at a progress research presentation
at the end of semester 3, and a draft manuscript is submit-
ted. Over the duration of the nal semester (semester 4)
students nalize data collection and analysis, and their
manuscripts. e semester culminates in the presentation
of research projects at the program research day in April
of each year. is event is open to the public, streamed live
online, and advertised across the region. Student groups
can then liaise with faculty regarding manuscript prepara-
tion and editing if they intend to pursue publication.
rough the promotion of scholarly activity related to
“real-world” practice, students undertake research and
scholarly activity that is central to professional practice.
is can stimulate important conversations about the
importance of professional practice that is based on
research. e skills acquired by students can not only
increase their appreciation for research, but also improve
their ability to appraise evidence, which can potentially
lead to improved patient care.
MENTORING AND ROLE-MODELLING
Research education in our programs is delivered by
academics with a background in paramedicine. is is not
only important for ensuring practice relevance but also
functions as a form of role-modelling for students, which
is vital in order to identify and support the next genera-
tion of paramedic researchers. Program faculty members
regularly conduct and lead research studies related to
professional and educational issues within paramedi-
cine, which provides further role-modelling behaviour
for students. Academic and scholarly achievements by
fellow students and alumni also provide students with an
important form of peer role-modelling, and demonstrate
that paramedic students can be involved in research.
ACHIEVEMENTS
Since 2017 total of 186 students (PCP and ACP) have
received formal research methods education. To date 62
paramedic student-led primary research studies, litera-
ture reviews, and CATs have been completed. Students
and faculty have been involved in scholarly activity
and primary research on topics related to paramedicine
including paramedic education, empathy, patient safety,
reective practice, wellbeing, mental health, vulnerable
populations, gender equity, and clinical topics including
trauma management, and neurological emergencies. ese
topics have been presented at conferences across Canada,
Ireland, the UK, the USA, and Australia, by both students
and faculty. A total of 34 students have authored or co-au-
thored articles that have been published in both peer-re-
viewed and non-peer-reviewed venues. In 2019, we were
honoured to host two paramedic student groups from
Georgian College as they presented their primary research
ndings at our program research day.
RATIONALE
Glenn et al. previously discussed the concept of
“hooking” rst year paramedic students with research (17),
through early involvement with research, and encourag-
ing students to discover that research is a core aspect of
evidence-based practice. Our approach to research educa-
tion in this program aims to achieve this “hook”, in partic-
ular through the design of the research course. is course
is based on three core principles (18):
1. learning is a social and interactive undertaking;
2. learning is maximized when situated in a real and
meaningful context;
3. there should be meaningful application of what has
been learned.
Paramedic students work in groups, investigate a
research topic of interest, and develop the project through
to presentation and publication. Student feedback has
demonstrated that by the end of the research education
course, many students at least appreciate the importance
of research to their practice, even if they do not intend
to continue as a researcher in the eld. Having tangible
output in the form of a presentation and potential publi-
cations at the end of the project, not merely a grade on a
transcript, gives meaning to the entire research process.
e research education course itself is continually rened
based on feedback from student cohorts, reecting the fact
that this novel approach has scope to improve, and needs
to evolve as we progress and learn from its successes and
failures.
CHALLENGES
Engaging students in a vocational, diploma-level educa-
tion program with research is not without its challenges.
Studies to date have been largely quantitative in nature,
which has resulted in a potentially fatigued target popula-
THE MCNALLY PROJECT
1514
JUNE/JULY 2019JUNE/JULY 2019
JUNE/JULY 2019JUNE/JULY 2019
| TABLE OF CONTENTS | | TABLE OF CONTENTS |
tion (generally fellow paramedic students), and small
sample sizes (peer population is approximately 100
students). Student groups are now beginning to pursue
more diverse research approaches, utilising a variety of
methodological approaches, and targeting broader popula-
tions (e.g., other healthcare students, practicing paramed-
ics).
As faculty members, we too have been challenged,
mainly in relation to our role-modelling and mentoring
roles. Much of our own research is undertaken volun-
tarily, and is largely unfunded. is can present signicant
challenges when trying to balance research activity with
other professional commitments such as teaching, and with
personal commitments. Recently we have achieved greater
success in gaining funding for research activities, from
both internal and external funding sources. is is vital
in providing support to the entire research program. e
limited number of faculty with education and experience
in research is also a challenge. In order to ensure continu-
ity of faculty role-models to students, we need to engage
our own faculty body in research to a much larger extent.
Many faculty members face the same barriers to engage-
ment with research outlined in the literature, including
lack of knowledge, concerns regarding clinical care, and
lack of support such as protected time and funding.
Paramedicine within Canada as a whole needs to
embrace research as an integral component of practice.
Engaging students with research is one method to do so.
However, upon qualication, there are limited opportu-
nities to engage with research as a practicing paramedic,
in particular funded research and education. In order to
generate the evidence required to support and if needs be,
change practice, we need to equip paramedics with the
skills, knowledge and experience to conduct research, but
more importantly, we need to support them to generate
research “for paramedics, by paramedics”.
CONCLUSION
ere is signicant future value to be realized from
paramedic student research activity, and across our
programs we have implemented education and research
activity as a means to build research capacity within the
system. We posit that paramedic student contributions
to the literature are important for both contextualizing
and reinforcing research education. rough this practi-
cal approach to research education, we hope to encour-
age students to explore professional issues, develop future
research talent within the profession, and signal our future
academic leaders.
Disclaimer: e views and opinions expressed in this
article are those of the authors and do not necessarily
reect the ocial policy or position of any employer or
organization.
REFERENCES
1. Reynolds L. Is prehospital care really a profession? J Emerg
Prim Heal Care. 2004;2(1–2):6p–6p.
2. Smith G. e importance of student paramedic contributions
to prehospital research. Australas J Paramed. 2015;12(4).
3. Devenish S. Developing a research culture in paramedic
practice. Australas J Paramed. 2016;13(4):13–5.
4. O’Meara P. Student research : the future of paramedicine.
Australas J Paramed. 2014;11(5):11–3.
5. Batt AM, Steary D. Student Paramedic Research at Fanshawe
College. Can Paramed. 2016;39(3):38–40.
6. Drennan IR. Georgian College Paramedic Research Day. Can
Paramed. 2019;42(2):19–21.
7. Batt AM, Knox S. Building research capacity among Irish
prehospital practitioners. Irish J Paramed. 2017;2(2):2–5.
8. Bigham BL, Jensen JL, Blanchard IE. Paramedic-driven
research. Cmaj. 2010;182(10):1080.
9. Boyle M. Promoting the Next Wave of Paramedic Researchers.
Australas J Paramed. 2015;12(4):4–5.
10. Centre for Prehospital Research. A National Prehospital
Research Strategy. Limerick; 2008.
11. Jansen JL, Soucha D. Canadian National EMS Research
Agenda. Ottawa; 2013.
12. National Institute for Health Research. Care at the Scene -
Research for ambulance services. London; 2016.
13. Sayre MR, White LJ, Brown LH, McHenry SD. e National
EMS research Strategic Plan. Prehospital Emerg Care.
2005;9(3):255–66.
14. Lim D, Grant-Wakeeld C, Tippett V. Engaging paramedic
students in research : A case report. Australas J Paramed.
2014;11(4).
15. Webley D. Inspired by Campeau : A pathway through under-
graduate paramedic research. In: Student Paramedics Austral-
asia Conference. 2016.
16. Stack H, Graham S, Johnston T. Getting Involved in Research:
A Student’s Perspective. Response. 2016;43(2):36–7.
17. Glenn T, Phillips D, Plews L. Hook, Line and Sinker Intro-
ducing Paramedic Students To e World Of Research. In:
Student Paramedics Australasia Conference. Sydney; 2016.
18. Terenzini PT. Research and practice in undergraduate
education: And never the twain shall meet? High Educ.
1999;38(1):33–48.
THE MCNALLY PROJECT
AUTHORS
Alan Batt is a faculty member in the
Paramedic Programs at Fanshawe
College, Ont., Canada.
Email: abatt@fanshawec.ca
Twitter: @alan_batt
Dugg Steary is Lead Educator for the ACP
Program at the Justice Institute of British
Columbia, BC, Canada.
Email: dsteary@jibc.ca
Twitter: @duggsteary
Paige Mason is a paramedic with Ottawa
Paramedic Service and faculty in the
Primary Care Paramedic Program in
Fanshawe College, Ontario, Canada.
Email: paigmason4@gmail.com
Twitter: @paigemason2
Trevor Hines Duncliffe is a faculty member
in the Primary Care Paramedic Program at
Fanshawe College, London, Ont., Canada.
Email: thinesdu@uwo.ca
Twitter: @TrevorHD
C. William Johnston is a paramedic with
Ottawa Paramedic Service and faculty in
the Primary Care Paramedic Program in
Fanshawe College, Ontario, Canada.
Email: johnstcw@gmail.com
Twitter: @seewillyj
Brad McArthur is Program Coordinator for
the Primary and Advanced Care Paramedic
Programs at Fanshawe College, Ont.,
Canada.
Email: bmcarthur@fanshawec.ca
Twitter: @ccpightmedic
THE MCNALLY PROJECT
1514
JUNE/JULY 2019JUNE/JULY 2019
JUNE/JULY 2019JUNE/JULY 2019
| TABLE OF CONTENTS | | TABLE OF CONTENTS |
tion (generally fellow paramedic students), and small
sample sizes (peer population is approximately 100
students). Student groups are now beginning to pursue
more diverse research approaches, utilising a variety of
methodological approaches, and targeting broader popula-
tions (e.g., other healthcare students, practicing paramed-
ics).
As faculty members, we too have been challenged,
mainly in relation to our role-modelling and mentoring
roles. Much of our own research is undertaken volun-
tarily, and is largely unfunded. is can present signicant
challenges when trying to balance research activity with
other professional commitments such as teaching, and with
personal commitments. Recently we have achieved greater
success in gaining funding for research activities, from
both internal and external funding sources. is is vital
in providing support to the entire research program. e
limited number of faculty with education and experience
in research is also a challenge. In order to ensure continu-
ity of faculty role-models to students, we need to engage
our own faculty body in research to a much larger extent.
Many faculty members face the same barriers to engage-
ment with research outlined in the literature, including
lack of knowledge, concerns regarding clinical care, and
lack of support such as protected time and funding.
Paramedicine within Canada as a whole needs to
embrace research as an integral component of practice.
Engaging students with research is one method to do so.
However, upon qualication, there are limited opportu-
nities to engage with research as a practicing paramedic,
in particular funded research and education. In order to
generate the evidence required to support and if needs be,
change practice, we need to equip paramedics with the
skills, knowledge and experience to conduct research, but
more importantly, we need to support them to generate
research “for paramedics, by paramedics”.
CONCLUSION
ere is signicant future value to be realized from
paramedic student research activity, and across our
programs we have implemented education and research
activity as a means to build research capacity within the
system. We posit that paramedic student contributions
to the literature are important for both contextualizing
and reinforcing research education. rough this practi-
cal approach to research education, we hope to encour-
age students to explore professional issues, develop future
research talent within the profession, and signal our future
academic leaders.
Disclaimer: e views and opinions expressed in this
article are those of the authors and do not necessarily
reect the ocial policy or position of any employer or
organization.
REFERENCES
1. Reynolds L. Is prehospital care really a profession? J Emerg
Prim Heal Care. 2004;2(1–2):6p–6p.
2. Smith G. e importance of student paramedic contributions
to prehospital research. Australas J Paramed. 2015;12(4).
3. Devenish S. Developing a research culture in paramedic
practice. Australas J Paramed. 2016;13(4):13–5.
4. O’Meara P. Student research : the future of paramedicine.
Australas J Paramed. 2014;11(5):11–3.
5. Batt AM, Steary D. Student Paramedic Research at Fanshawe
College. Can Paramed. 2016;39(3):38–40.
6. Drennan IR. Georgian College Paramedic Research Day. Can
Paramed. 2019;42(2):19–21.
7. Batt AM, Knox S. Building research capacity among Irish
prehospital practitioners. Irish J Paramed. 2017;2(2):2–5.
8. Bigham BL, Jensen JL, Blanchard IE. Paramedic-driven
research. Cmaj. 2010;182(10):1080.
9. Boyle M. Promoting the Next Wave of Paramedic Researchers.
Australas J Paramed. 2015;12(4):4–5.
10. Centre for Prehospital Research. A National Prehospital
Research Strategy. Limerick; 2008.
11. Jansen JL, Soucha D. Canadian National EMS Research
Agenda. Ottawa; 2013.
12. National Institute for Health Research. Care at the Scene -
Research for ambulance services. London; 2016.
13. Sayre MR, White LJ, Brown LH, McHenry SD. e National
EMS research Strategic Plan. Prehospital Emerg Care.
2005;9(3):255–66.
14. Lim D, Grant-Wakeeld C, Tippett V. Engaging paramedic
students in research : A case report. Australas J Paramed.
2014;11(4).
15. Webley D. Inspired by Campeau : A pathway through under-
graduate paramedic research. In: Student Paramedics Austral-
asia Conference. 2016.
16. Stack H, Graham S, Johnston T. Getting Involved in Research:
A Student’s Perspective. Response. 2016;43(2):36–7.
17. Glenn T, Phillips D, Plews L. Hook, Line and Sinker Intro-
ducing Paramedic Students To e World Of Research. In:
Student Paramedics Australasia Conference. Sydney; 2016.
18. Terenzini PT. Research and practice in undergraduate
education: And never the twain shall meet? High Educ.
1999;38(1):33–48.
THE MCNALLY PROJECT
AUTHORS
Alan Batt is a faculty member in the
Paramedic Programs at Fanshawe
College, Ont., Canada.
Email: abatt@fanshawec.ca
Twitter: @alan_batt
Dugg Steary is Lead Educator for the ACP
Program at the Justice Institute of British
Columbia, BC, Canada.
Email: dsteary@jibc.ca
Twitter: @duggsteary
Paige Mason is a paramedic with Ottawa
Paramedic Service and faculty in the
Primary Care Paramedic Program in
Fanshawe College, Ontario, Canada.
Email: paigmason4@gmail.com
Twitter: @paigemason2
Trevor Hines Duncliffe is a faculty member
in the Primary Care Paramedic Program at
Fanshawe College, London, Ont., Canada.
Email: thinesdu@uwo.ca
Twitter: @TrevorHD
C. William Johnston is a paramedic with
Ottawa Paramedic Service and faculty in
the Primary Care Paramedic Program in
Fanshawe College, Ontario, Canada.
Email: johnstcw@gmail.com
Twitter: @seewillyj
Brad McArthur is Program Coordinator for
the Primary and Advanced Care Paramedic
Programs at Fanshawe College, Ont.,
Canada.
Email: bmcarthur@fanshawec.ca
Twitter: @ccpightmedic
THE MCNALLY PROJECT
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For the first time since the establishment of a paramedicine peer-reviewed journal in Australia and New Zealand a Special Edition is being published specifically for student contributions. This is an important juncture in the evolution of our profession that recognises the importance of the next generation of paramedic practitioners, scholars and leaders. It really does mark a departure from our vocational training roots to being a tertiary-educated health profession that works in partnership and alongside the other health professions
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