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A modelling approach to evaluate the effectiveness of different mitigation strategies to reduce the negative effects of agricultural practices on biodiversity in the Netherlands: Final report within the framework of the project: "Developing and application of a methodology to assess impacts of pesticides on key ecosystem services"

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A report of simulations conducted with ALMaSS, a simulation systems for evaluating the impact of management on wildlife, for different pesticide management strategies in 10 landscapes in The Netherlands, and for a carabid beetle, skylarks and hares.
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... Calculations with the ALMaSS model (Ziółkowska and Topping, 2019) show that driftreducing measures have little effect on the occurrence of the Bembidion lampros beetle. This ground beetle plays an important role in natural pest control and is comparable to other ground beetles in terms of behaviour. ...
... In addition to reducing environmental impact, the creation of field margins is an effective measure to stimulate functional agricultural biodiversity ( Figure 30; Ziółkowska and Topping, 2019;EFSA PPR Panel, 2015). The effect is the strongest in areas that currently contain few landscape elements. ...
... The Animal, Landscape and Man Simulation System (ALMaSS) (Topping et al., 2003) used in this study has been already applied to evaluate the impact of changing insecticide toxicity and landscape structure on population density and the distribution of beetles in exemplary landscapes in Denmark (Topping et al., 2015 and in the Netherlands (Ziółkowska and Topping, 2019). However, findings obtained in these two countries may not be fully applicable across Europe, as each country is probably unique in its combination of landscape structure and management. ...
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