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Let me write a dissertation for you: the micro-level cost-benefit approach to doctoral degree fraud

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Abstract

This study aims at investigating corruption in doctoral education. In order to reach this goal, this study focuses on Ukraine. Specifically, this study researches the market of writing and defending doctoral dissertations, also known as dissertations market. This study identifies providers of the service, as well as types of services they offer, and prices they charge. The total of 46 private for-profit firms that offer dissertations for sale was found and analysed. Such dissertations on order services are accompanied by offerings of all other services needed to qualify for a doctorate. Simple calculation and comparison of total costs and benefits of buying a dissertation indicate that purchasing a doctorate may be a good investment. The overwhelming corruption helps trade in dissertations as long as personal benefits exceed the costs of acquiring a doctorate.

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Byudzhet osvity ta nauky 2018: Scho pryjnyav parlament” [Education and science budget 2018: What the parliament voted for
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