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Big Challenges on Joliot-Curie - Before it goes in full production, a series of Grand Challenges – large scale simulations from academic and industry research – were carried out on Joliot-Curie supercomputer, from June to September 2018, to check that the system is functioning properly. These Grand Challenges represent a unique opportunity for selected scientists to gain access to the full supercomputer's resources, enabling them to make major advances, or even achieve world firsts that would be impossible to achieve with shared use.
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