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Design Science Research (DSR) has many risks. Researchers inexperienced in DSR, especially early career researchers (ECRs) and research students (e.g. PhD students) risk inefficient projects (with delays, rework, etc.) at best and research project failure at worst if they do not manage and treat DSR risks in a proactive manner. The DSR literature, such as the Risk Management Framework for Design Science Research (RMF4DSR), provides advice for identifying risks, but provides few suggestions for specific treatments for the kinds of risks that potentially plague DSR. This paper describes the development of a new purposeful artefact (TRiDS: Treatments for Risks in Design Science) to address this lack of suggestions for treatment of DSR risks. The paper describes how the purposeful artefact was developed (following a DSR methodology), what literature it draws upon to inspire its various components, the functional requirements identified for TRiDS, and how TRiDS is structured and why. The paper also documents the TRiDS purposeful artefact in detail, including four main components: (1) an extended set of risk checklists (extended from RMF4DSR), (2) a set of 47 specific suggestions for treating known risks in DSR, (3) a classification of the treatments identified into 14 different categories, and (4) a look-up table for identifying candidate treatments based on a risk in the extended risk checklists. The treatment suggestions and guidance in TRiDS serve as a supplement to RMF4DSR by helping DSR researchers to identify treatments appropriate for a 1 Venable, J., vom Brocke,
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Designing TRiDS: Treatments for Risks in Design Science
1
John R Venable, Curtin University, Australia
Jan vom Brocke, University of Liechtenstein
Robert Winter, University of St. Gallen, Switzerland
Abstract
Design Science Research (DSR) has many risks. Researchers inexperienced in DSR,
especially early career researchers (ECRs) and research students (e.g. PhD students) risk
inefficient projects (with delays, rework, etc.) at best and research project failure at worst if
they do not manage and treat DSR risks in a proactive manner. The DSR literature, such as
the Risk Management Framework for Design Science Research (RMF4DSR), provides
advice for identifying risks, but provides few suggestions for specific treatments for the kinds
of risks that potentially plague DSR.
This paper describes the development of a new purposeful artefact (TRiDS: Treatments for
Risks in Design Science) to address this lack of suggestions for treatment of DSR risks. The
paper describes how the purposeful artefact was developed (following a DSR methodology),
what literature it draws upon to inspire its various components, the functional requirements
identified for TRiDS, and how TRiDS is structured and why. The paper also documents the
TRiDS purposeful artefact in detail, including four main components: (1) an extended set of
risk checklists (extended from RMF4DSR), (2) a set of 47 specific suggestions for treating
known risks in DSR, (3) a classification of the treatments identified into 14 different
categories, and (4) a look-up table for identifying candidate treatments based on a risk in the
extended risk checklists. The treatment suggestions and guidance in TRiDS serve as a
supplement to RMF4DSR by helping DSR researchers to identify treatments appropriate for a
1
Venable, J., vom Brocke, J., Winter, R. (2019), Designing TRiDS: Treatments for Risks in Design Science, in:
Australasian Journal of Information Systems (AJIS), June 2019.
particular DSR project (or program) and thereby to improve DSR project efficiency and the
probability of DSR project success.
1 Introduction
There has been much written and published about research methods for Design Science
Research (DSR), especially in the field of Information Systems, since the publication of
Hevner et al. (2004). Methods for DSR include those by Vaishnavi and Kuechler (2004,
2015), Peffers et al. (2008), Hevner and Chatterjee (2010), Sein et al. (2011), Bilandzic and
Venable (2011), and Pries-Heje et al. (2014b).
Managing risks is an important area for any kind of project, including DSR projects.
According to Pries-Heje et al. (2014a, p. 61), “Risk Management is the identification of and
response to potential problems with sufficient lead time to avoid a crisis. Thus risk
management is proactive.” Design Science researchers need to manage DSR project risks
proactively, lest they incur substantial, possibly severe, costs. Unless they do so, at best, they
risk conducting DSR projects inefficiently (with higher costs and delays for rework or
following poor design decisions longer than necessary). At worst, they risk DSR project
failure, with a complete waste of time and other resources and potentially the loss of
reputation, career opportunities, etc. Inexperienced DSR researchers, especially early career
researchers (ECRs) and research students (e.g. Honours, Masters, or PhD students) are
especially vulnerable to DSR risks because they have little experience with research and little
exposure to the breadth of the DSR literature and their careers are impacted by project results
more directly. To be successful, they need timely and comprehensive guidance for DSR risk
identification and treatment.
The DSR literature does provide some pockets of advice on managing risks in DSR. For
example, the seven guidelines for DSR research included in Hevner et al. (2004) identify key
areas of DSR work for which the quality should be managed. Other DSR literature addresses
management of DSR risks through early (“formative” or “ex ante”) evaluation (Baskerville et
al., 2008; Sonnenberg & Vom Brocke, 2012a, 2012b; Venable et al., 2012, 2016) – as
opposed to solely relying on a final (“summative” or “ex post”) evaluation, which is
conducted following completion of the design and implementation of the purposeful artefact,
when there is little or no time or other resources for correcting any inadequacies in the
artefact and or its performance in meeting its objectives. The most substantial contribution to
risk management in the DSR literature is that of Baskerville, Pries-Heje, and Venable
(Baskerville et al., 2011; Pries-Heje et al., 2008; Pries-Heje et al., 2014a), who specifically
address DSR risk identification, assessment, prioritisation, and management. However, none
of this literature identifies more than a very few specific treatments for preventing,
overcoming, or alleviating specific DSR risks.
There are many risks to both the efficiency and the success of DSR projects, e.g. as identified
by Pries-Heje et al. (2014a). However, researchers (especially novices, such as ECRs and
research students) lack important advice and suggestions for how to treat risks to DSR, so
that they can manage those risks in a proactive and effective way. Supervisors of DSR
researchers could also benefit from a more comprehensive treatment of risk management in
DSR. Funding bodies and industry partners engaged in DSR projects also have a major
interest in identifying and treating risks in collaborative research projects (Vom Brocke &
Lippe, 2010).
This paper reports on the development of TRiDS (Treatments for Risks in Design Science), a
purposeful artefact developed by the authors to overcome the above problems. TRiDS
suggests specific treatments for every specific DSR risk previously identified in the extensive
DSR risk checklists by Pries-Heje et al. (2014a), as well as some other DSR risks identified
in this paper. Risks that are not specific to DSR (e.g. general project risks such as missing
deadlines or scoping failures) are not addressed in this paper.
The rest of this paper follows the organisation suggested by Gregor and Hevner (Gregor &
Hevner, 2013) for a publication reporting DSR research. Section 2 expands on the literature
identified above and details what is already in the literature about risk treatment in DSR, as
well as literature from other domains that inspired our identification of various other risk
treatments. Section 3 describes the research method (Design Science Research Methodology
or DSRM (Vaishnavi & Kuechler, 2004, 2015)) used to develop TRiDS. Sections 4 describes
the TRiDS purposeful artefact, including requirements for TRiDS and the details of the
TRiDS artefact and its components. Section 5 describes how TRiDS was evaluated and the
outcomes of that evaluation. Section 6 discusses the findings of the research. Finally, section
7 draws conclusions about TRiDS and the potential for further research.
2 Literature Review
This first part of this literature review covers the DSR literature relating to the problem to be
addressed and develops the research gap, i.e. the lack of specific suggestions for how to treat
risks encountered in DSR. The second part identifies and reviews other literature that inspired
some of the specific treatments that are incorporated into TRiDS.
2.1 DSR Literature Relevant to DSR Risk Management
There are two main areas of the DSR literature that are relevant to DSR risk management: (1)
Literature on guidelines for DSR, (2) literature on evaluation as a key activity in DSR, and
(3) literature specifically about risk management in DSR. These are covered in sections 2.1.1-
2.1.3 below.
2.1.1 DSR Guidelines
The DSR literature provides some guidelines for what makes quality or acceptable DSR.
Hevner et al. (2004) provide seven guidelines for DSR (see below).
1. Design as an Artefact
2. Problem Relevance
3. Design Evaluation
4. Research Contributions
5. Research Rigour
6. Design as a Search Process
7. Communication of Research
Venable (2010, 2015) surveyed DSR authors, DESRIST program committee members, and
IS basket of eight journal editors concerning their opinions of what criteria and standards are
more important in DSR. The findings were that Hevner et al. (2004) guidelines 2, 4, 1, and 3
(in that order) were most important, while other highly rated criteria aligned with the
guidelines (e.g. relevance of problem and significance for problem clearly established). Also
in the top 10 most important criteria were “clear understanding of why the artefact works (or
doesn’t work)” and “depth of analysis and clarity of understanding of the problem and its
causes.”
It is a sensible approach to DSR risk management to understand key DSR guidelines and take
action to ensure that any relevant (or at least that the most important) guidelines are met.
2.1.2 DSR Evaluation Literature
Baskerville, Pries-Heje, and Venable have also published several papers suggesting that DSR
risks of poor usability or of technical or organisational feasibility might be treated through
multiple, ex ante (or formative) evaluations of prototypes or partial artefacts (Venable et al.,
2012, 2016).
One purpose identified for evaluation in DSR is to “evaluate a designed artifact formatively
to identify weaknesses and areas of improvement for an artifact under development”
(Venable et al., 2012, p. 426). They also identify that artificial, ex ante (formative) evaluation
has the lowest risk to participants in the research, but naturalistic, ex post evaluation has the
lowest risk of a false positive, which is especially important for safety-critical systems
(Venable et al., 2012, p. 432, figure 2).
In their subsequent paper on FEDS (Framework for Evaluation in Design Science, Venable et
al., 2016), they suggest that different evaluation strategies (typical trajectories of evaluation
episodes) can be used to reduce risks of technical or organisational feasibility or of
insufficient evaluation rigour with respect to effectiveness or efficacy. Technical feasibility
and/or rigorous evaluation of efficacy are better achieved with a Technical Risk & Efficacy
evaluation strategy, which starts with one or more artificial formative evaluation episode(s),
transitions to one or more artificial summative evaluation episode(s), and concludes with one
or more naturalistic summative evaluation episode(s). Organisational feasibility, usability,
and/or rigorous evaluation of effectiveness are better achieved with a Human Risk &
Effectiveness evaluation strategy, which starts with one or more artificial formative
evaluation episode(s), transitions to one or more naturalistic formative evaluation episode(s),
and concludes with one or more naturalistic summative evaluation episode(s).
Sonnenberg and vom Brocke (2012b) present a conceptualisation for concurrent evaluation
according to different aspects of design. They build on prior work describing DSR activities
within the overall DSR process, and they argue that, in each of these activities, different
progress towards the intended artefacts is made, which offer the potential for concurrent (or
formative) evaluation. Such evaluation can mitigate risk, since early feedback on more fine-
grained steps leading to the eventual artefact can be incorporated into the design process.
Further, they argue that evaluation can be more specific (compared to summative evaluation),
and the information to be gained can be more directed, if the evaluation is focussed on
particular relevant aspects of the design at the time-related decisions are made in the design
process.
In order to exemplify their approach, they distinguish four evaluation types (Eval 1 to Eval
4), which are derived from typical DSR activities, and which are characterized by the input
and output of each activity as wells as specific evaluation criteria and evaluation methods.
Eval 1: Evaluating the problem identification: criteria include importance, novelty and feasibility.
Eval 2: Evaluating the solution design: criteria include simplicity, clarity and consistency.
Eval 3: Evaluating the solution instantiation: criteria include ease of use, fidelity with real-world phenomenon
and robustness.
Eval 4: Evaluating the solution in use: criteria include effectiveness, efficiency and external consistency.
Stoeckli et al. (2017) examined how IS scholars actually apply the above evaluations, as
reported in papers citing Sonnenberg and vom Brocke (2012b). They found that few DSR
researchers try concurrent evaluation and, if they do, they focus on early phases and
apparently find value in doing so.
These early evaluations (Eval 1 and Eval 2) are in accordance with using formative
evaluations (Venable et al., 2016) and the principle of “fail early, fail often” (Abraham et al.,
2014).
2.1.3 DSR Risk Management Literature
Pries-Heje et al. (2014a) provide (mostly) comprehensive DSR risks checklists as part of their
Risk Management Framework for DSR (RMF4DSR). Their risk checklists cover six areas (A
through F) of potential risks in DSR:
A. Identifying, selecting, and developing understanding of the business needs to be addressed in the DSR
project or program,
B. Grounding of the DSR in knowledge available in the body of recorded human knowledge
C. Building design artefacts
D. Evaluating design artefacts and design theories
E. Artefact dissemination and use
F. Adding knowledge to the body of human knowledge
In all, Pries-Heje et al. (2014a) identify 38 different risks specific to DSR and suggest that
DSR researchers should use the checklist to identify particular risks relevant to their project
as instances of each type of risk on the checklist. Checklists A-F below show the risks
identified in Pries-Heje et al. (2014a), grouped by each of the above six categories.
Checklist A: Business needs
A-1 Selection of a problem that lacks significance for any stakeholder
A-2 Difficulty getting information about the problem and the context
A-3 Different and even conflicting stakeholder interests (some of which may not be
surfaced)
A-4 Poor understanding of the problem to be solved
A-5 Solving the wrong problem, i.e. a problem that isn’t a main contributor to
undesirable outcomes that motivate the problem solving
A-6 Poor/vague definition/statement of problem to be solved, with potential
misunderstanding by others
A-7 Inappropriate choice or definition of a problem according to a solution at hand
A-8 Inappropriate formulation of the problem
Checklist B: Grounding
B-1 Ignorance or lack of knowledge of existing research relevant to the problem
understanding and over-reliance on personal experience with or imagination of the
problem
B-2 Ignorance or lack of knowledge of existing design science research into solution
technologies for solving the problem, i.e. lack of knowledge of the state of the art
B-3 Ignorance or lack of knowledge of existing relevant natural and behavioural
science research forming kernel theories for understanding or solving the problem
Checklist C: Build Design Artefacts
C-1 Development of a conjectural (un-instantiated) solution which cannot be
instantiated (built or made real), cf. technical risk in Venable et al. (2016)
C-2 Development of a hypothetical (untried) solution which is ineffective in solving
the problem, i.e. the artefact doesn’t work doesn’t work well in real situations with
various socio-technical complications, cf. human risk in Venable et al. (2016)
C-3 Development of a hypothetical (untried) solution which is inefficient in solving
the problem, i.e. requiring overly high resource costs
C-4 Development of a hypothetical (untried) solution which is inefficacious in solving
the problem, i.e. the artefact isn’t really the cause of an improvement observed during
evaluation
C-5 Development of a hypothetical (untried) solution which cannot be taught to or
understood by those who are intended to use it, e.g. overly complex or inelegant
C-6 Development of a hypothetical (untried) solution which is difficult or impossible
to get adopted by those who are intended to use it, whether for personal or political
reasons
C-7 Development of a hypothetical (untried) solution which causes new problems that
make the outcomes of the solution more trouble than the original problem, i.e. there
are significant side effects
Checklist D: Evaluate
D-1 Tacit requirements (which by definition cannot be surfaced) are not dealt with
when evaluating the solution technology, leading to failure of the solution technology
to meet those requirements
D-2 Failure to surface some or all of the relevant requirements leads to those
requirements not being dealt with when evaluating the solution technology, leading to
failure of the solution technology to meet those requirements
D-3 Incorrectly matching the articulated requirements to the meta-requirements of the
ISDT lead to the testing of the IDST and evaluation of an instantiation of the meta-
design in a situation for which neither should be applied
D-4 Incorrectly matching the meta-design or the design method to the meta-
requirements (not following the ISDT correctly) leads to evaluation of something
other than the correct solution technology or the ISDT as stated
D-5 Improper application of the meta-design or the design method (not in accordance
with the ISDT) in designing an instantiation leads to evaluation of something other
than the correct solution technology or the ISDT as stated
D-6 Improperly building an instantiation of the solution technology (such that it does
not properly embody the meta-design) leads to evaluation of something other than the
correct solution technology or the ISDT as stated
D-7 Difficulties in implementing the solution technology during naturalistic
evaluation, due to such things as unforeseen complications within the
business/organization, prevent the instantiation of the solution technology from
successfully meeting its objectives
D-8 Success of the solution technology to meet its objectives is not obtained due to
dynamic or changing requirements beyond the scope of the solution technology
D-9 Success of the solution technology to meet its objectives is not achieved due to
poor change management practices
D-10 Determination of success or failure in reaching the objectives of the solution
technology is error-prone or impossible due to disagreement about objectives or
inability to measure
D-11 Existing organizational culture, local organizational culture differences (sub-
cultures), political conflicts, etc. complicate the evaluation process or weaken the
ability to make meaningful measurement of the achievement of the objectives of the
solution technology
D-12 Existing organizational priorities, structures, practices, procedures, etc.
complicate the evaluation process or ability to make/measure the achievement of the
objectives D-III Emergence of new organizational or individual practices, structures,
priorities, norms, culture, or other aspects that complicate the acceptability,
workability, or efficiency of the application of the solution technology in a naturalistic
setting
Checklist E: Artefact Dissemination and Use
E-1 Implementation in practice of a solution does not work effectively, efficiently,
and/or efficaciously
E-2 Misunderstanding the appropriate context for and limitations of the solution
E-3 Misunderstanding how to apply the solution
E-4 Inappropriate handling of adoption, diffusion, and organizational implementation
Checklist F: Knowledge Additions
F-1 Inability to publish or present research results
F-2 Publication of low significance research
F-3 Publication of incorrect research
F-4 Design artefacts prove too unique to disseminate
Pries-Heje et al. (2014a) further suggest that, after identifying specific risks inspired by the
checklists, DSR researchers should next analyse and prioritise identified risks and only then
determine risk treatments, especially for higher priority risks (those risks that are more likely
and with more potential of negative impact). To support the identification of treatments, they
propose a DSR risk treatment framework, based on the traditional risk management literature,
with a generic treatment type in each of four quadrants: self-insure (for low probability, low
impact risks), transfer (for low probability, but higher potential impact risks), self-protect (for
higher probability, but low impact risks), and avoidance (for higher probability and high
potential impact risks) (Pries-Heje et al., 2014a). These four quadrants are also known
respectively as the four T’s: (1) tolerate, (2) transfer, (3) treat, and (4) terminate (Hopkin,
2017).
However, Pries-Heje et al. (2014a) do not recommend risk treatments for the different kinds
of risks. In fact, they expressly avoid doing so, stating “We could list resolution techniques
for each risk item. However, we fear that this may limit the generative process of thinking
through what should be done about each risk in the specific context. Hence we prefer—and
believe it to be a better approach—to let the user (DSR researcher) decide the Risk Treatment
within broader categories of treatments.” (Pries-Heje et al., 2014a, p. 61).
Nonetheless, in explicating the different classes of risk treatments and in providing a
naturalistic case study evaluation of RMF4DSR, they do identify a number of specific risk
treatments, such as “Use pilots and prototypes so it becomes clear very fast what the
contribution could be” and “Use many diverse problem identification techniques such as
document study, observe sourcing-atwork [sic], interview at many levels, etc.” (Pries-Heje et
al., 2014a, p. 18). However, their examples do not cover treatments for all of the different
risks and are sometimes specific to the particular case study in their evaluation of RMF4DSR.
2.1.4 Problem to Be Solved
The problem addressed in this paper is the lack of suggestions and guidance for specific
treatments for the large number and variety of risks in conducting DSR. As noted in Pries-
Heje et al. (2014a), there are a significant number of risks that are specific to DSR. For those
risks, recommended practices from the general research methods and practice literature may
not be adequate. Moreover, that literature has not specifically addressed those risks unique to
DSR. Even within the DSR literature in particular, identification of risk treatments is far from
comprehensive. Many of the risks in DSR have no specific treatments recommended for them
in the literature. The very general types of treatments from the general risk management
literature incorporated within Pries-Heje et al. (2014a) are difficult to apply because they are
insufficiently specific and rely too much on the ingenuity of the researcher. More guidance
and candidate suggestions for risk treatments are needed.
2.2 Non-DSR Literature Relevant to DSR Risk Management
This section identifies and summarises salient aspects of other literature that inspired or
informed the design of TRiDS.
2.2.1 General and IS Risk Management
There is a large and rich literature on risk management, both generally and in Information
Systems. IS Risk Management is a special case of General Risk Management. Furthermore,
we can conceptualise that DSR (project) Risk Management is a special case of Research
Project Risk Management, which is a special case of Project Risk Management, which is a
special case of General Risk Management. While we cannot possibly cover all of this
literature here, we mention a few examples useful for our purposes here.
Among many others, Hopkin (2017) gives an overview of risk management generally (not
specific to any domain), covering areas such as kinds of risks, risk management standards, an
eight-step process for risk management (the 8 R’s: (1) recognise, (2) rate, (3) rank, (4)
respond (deciding how to respond – tolerate, transfer, treat, or terminate – the four T’s), (5)
resource (the decided response), (6) reaction planning, (7) report, and (8) review), and four
risk control techniques (treatments), including (1) preventive, (2) corrective, (3) directive,
and (4) detective. While RMF4DSR analyses risks to determine which of the 4 T’s applies, it
does not suggest different controls (preventive, corrective, directive, and detective). Detective
treatments identify occurrences of risks, which then need to be followed up with corrective
treatments (e.g. redesign) to fix the problem identified.
Iversen et al. (2004) suggest four different types of approaches to Software Risk
Management: (1) a risk list, (2) a risk-action list, (3) a risk-strategy model, and (4) a risk-
strategy analysis. The approach in RMF4DSR (Pries-Heje et al., 2014a) is to start with a list
of known candidate risks and determine their relevance to form a risk list. After prioritisation,
the approach adds risk treatments, to form a risk-action list. Importantly, RMF4DSR lacks
suggestions for different kinds of treatments, which suggested to the authors that we should
add candidate treatments to the candidate risk list, to form a candidate risk-action list.
However, neither RMF4DSR nor TRiDS attempt to aggregate risks or treatments and no
overall strategy is created.
2.2.2 Participation in System Development and DSR
There is a long and rich literature about participation in system development, including
participatory design/development (e.g. the series of Participatory Design Conferences, (PDC,
2018b)), user-centred design/development, co-design, and aspects of design thinking. The
key idea is that participation by users/stakeholders in the design of purposeful artefacts (such
as IS) helps ensure that the design meets the users’ needs and motivates them to adopt and
use the resulting purposeful artefact(s). E.g. see (PDC, 2018a). Modern Agile development
methods also include user/customer/client participation as a key concept. E.g., the first value
of the Agile Manifesto (Beck et al., 2001) is to value “Individuals and interactions over
processes and tools”, while the third agile value (of only four) is to value “Customer
collaboration over contract negotiation.”
Participation is a key part of several DSR methodologies, including Action Design Research
(Sein et al., 2011), Participatory Action Design Research (Bilandzic & Venable, 2011), and
Soft Design Science Methodology (Pries-Heje et al., 2014b).
Research on Agile Software Development has shown the importance of participation to deal
with change in information systems design (ISD) processes. According to Conboy (2009)
agility is defined as the “the continual readiness of an ISD method to rapidly or inherently
create change, proactively or reactively embrace change, and learn from change while
contributing to perceived customer value (economy, quality, and simplicity), through its
collective components and relationships with its environment”. The Manifesto for Agile
Software Development (Fowler & Highsmith, 2001) and approaches such as XP and Scrum
(cf. Boehm, 2002; Highsmith, 2002; Highsmith & Cockburn, 2001) make normative
statements on how to increase agility in ISD, including aspects of participatory design and
early feedback on intermediate artefacts. These approaches rejected highly-formalized
approaches to working in favour of faster, user-centric, and more dynamic methodologies that
enable continuous delivery, requirements change and reflection. Agile methods have been
successfully applied across diverse contexts and domains (Boehm, 2002; Gary et al., 2011;
Lindvall et al., 2002), and they are agile adoption has been attracting increasing interest in
research also beyond ISD (Fitzgerald et al., 2006; Nerur et al., 2005; Wang et al., 2012).
2.2.3 Software Engineering Reviews
The software engineering literature describes the practice and benefits of many different
kinds of reviews, including design reviews (and software design reviews) (Jalote, 2008), code
inspections (Jalote, 2008), peer reviews (Summers, 2011), software inspections (Summers,
2011), software engineering reviews (Summers, 2011), and formal reviews and audits
(Summers, 2011). Summers (2011) suggests six formal reviews or audits: system
requirements review, system design review, software specification review, preliminary design
review, critical design review, and joint technical reviews. This literature suggests that
reviewing intermediate artefacts as well as the final artefact is a key way to identify problems
so that the artefacts can be improved (and risks are avoided).
2.2.4 Literature Reviews
There is a very useful body of work on how to accomplish a good literature review (e.g.
Jennex (2015); Vom Brocke et al. (2015); Webster & Watson (2002)). Conducting a proper
literature review and following the advice in papers such as these can be a very useful
approach to reducing research risks, such as those relating to grounding, building and
disseminating the artefact, most specifically as identified in RMF4DSR (Pries-Heje et al.,
2014a).
2.2.5 Change Management
Several of the risks identified in RMF4DSR (Pries-Heje et al., 2014a) relate to change
management. There is extensive literature on how to manage change well. Planning and
designing a purposeful artefact to accommodate change or even making change management
recommendations could be effective risk management treatments. Knowledge of change
management approaches and concerns, such as contained in the Change Management Body
of Knowledge (CMBOK) (CMI, 2014) can inspire risk treatments and practices. Specifically,
risks related to the “evaluation” and “use” of the artefact (Pries-Heje et al., 2014a) can be
mitigated by appropriate dissemination and communication strategies supporting intended
users to effectively and efficiently apply the artefact.
2.2.6 Problem Analysis and Formulation
There is a very rich literature on problem analysis and formulation. Among other areas and
approaches, Soft Systems Methodology (Checkland, 1981; Checkland & Holwell, 1999;
Checkland & Scholes, 1990) provides extensive advice and techniques (e.g. rich pictures,
CATWOE, and root definitions) for analysing problems and obtaining agreement among
stakeholders. Methods for causal analysis and reasoning include cognitive mapping
(Ackermann & Eden, 2001; Eden, 1988; Eden & Ackermann, 1998, 2001) and its extension
to coloured cognitive mapping (Venable, 2005) and the application of coloured cognitive
mapping to DSR (Venable, 2014). Also very useful for problem analysis and formulation are
approaches to stakeholder analysis, such as the instrumental view in Mitchell et al. (1997)
and the systems-thinking-based view of Ulrich (1987). All of these approaches potentially
provide useful ways to reduce risks related to poor requirements analysis and formulation.
Much of the above literature is also closely related to participation by a variety of
stakeholders (see section 2.2.2).
In addition to general approaches, tool-based support using shared representations of a
problem and/or solution may be useful for creating the common ground needed for joint
inquiry (Hickman, 1998; Hildebrand, 2008) into formulating and solving problems, e.g.
through co-design (Steen, 2013). Avdiji et al. (2018) describe principles for such tools using
examples such as the Business Model Canvas and the Team Alignment Canvas. Still others
have developed canvas tools specifically to support DSR (e.g. Morana et al., 2018; Nagle &
Sammon, 2016).
Having identified a number of potentially useful avenues from the literature, we now consider
how those ideas were selected and incorporated into TRiDS.
3 Research Method
Research methods and techniques are designed artefacts. They are designed for the purpose
of conducting research efficaciously, effectively, efficiently, and ethically (cf. the five E’s in
Checkland and Scholes (1990)). Venable and Baskerville (2012) asserted that, as designed
purposeful artefacts, research methods and techniques should be developed and evaluated
using a Design Science Research approach.
To provide useful guidance to DSR researchers, especially inexperienced ones, on risk
treatment in DSR, this research developed a new purposeful artefact (TRiDS: Treatments for
Risks in Design Science). TRiDS is an approach for identifying suitable treatments for risks
potentially encountered in DSR. Therefore, we adopted a DSR approach to this research.
Our research roughly followed the DSR lifecycle of the Design Science Research Method
(DSRM), developed by Vaishnavi and Kuechler (2004, 2015). DSRM has five stages: (1)
Awareness of problem, (2) Suggestion, (3) Development, (4) Evaluation, and (5) Conclusion,
as well as the possibility to cycle back to earlier stages. We now summarise each of these five
stages and introduce how they were addressed in this research and where they are covered in
this paper.
3.1 Awareness of Problem Stage
In the awareness of problem stage of DSRM, we formulated and agreed upon the problem to
be solved, in line with section 1 above. In conducting this research we first considered the
problem to be solved and then considered requirements for a new purposeful artefact
(TRiDS) that could be used to solve the problem. More than just awareness of a problem, it is
important to understand the problem to be solved and for researchers to agree on a definition
of the problem. Such problem formulation can be found in many DSR methodologies,
including Design Science Research Methodology (Peffers et al., 2008), Action Design
Research (Sein et al., 2011), or Soft Design Science Methodology (Pries-Heje et al., 2014b).
Importantly, the scope decided for TRiDS was not the initial scope for the artefact. When the
research began, we considered additionally providing further guidance for risk identification,
as well as a lifecycle or methodology for risk management covering all the DSR activities.
After some initial design iterations and a clearer idea of the role of RMF4DSR, the research
team agreed to focus the scope of the design of TRiDS on identifying appropriate and
specific treatments for known DSR risks, not on identifying and prioritising the risks to a
particular DSR project, which is already handled well by RMF4DSR. Thus, the aim and
scope of TRiDS is to serve as a supplement or further step to the support for risk management
provided by RMF4DSR. In addition to setting the scope of the problem, we further
formulated requirements for a purposeful artefact to solve the problem, as will be described
in section 4 on the design of TRiDS.
3.2 Suggestion Stage
The suggestion stage of DSRM uses abductive reasoning to identify or inspire one or more
approaches to solving the problem and making an improvement. In the suggestion phase, we
considered the literature of different kinds of treatments for mitigating risks, including
literature from DSR risk management, DSR methodologies, and risk management more
generally, research methods more generally, software engineering, and system development.
An overview of relevant aspects of these was given in section 2. We further reviewed all the
known risks and brainstormed ideas for how to mitigate each risk. More details on the
suggestion phase are provided in section 4.
3.3 Development Stage
In the development stage of DSRM, we conducted analyses and designed an artefact to
include those ideas. First, we reviewed the different risks in the Pries-Heje et al. (2014a)
checklists and brainstormed different treatments for each individual risk, based on our
understanding of the research literature and our collective experiences as researchers. We did
this risk by risk to ensure that every single DSR risk has at least one treatment. In doing so,
we also identified a small number of risks not included in Pries-Heje et al. (2014a), which we
present as part of TRiDS in section 4. Finally, we needed to design a way to present the
outcomes of our analysis so that they are parsimonious and easily understandable. During this
process, we went through a number of design iterations in which we discussed and reviewed
the different treatments, as well as how to present them, then revised our artefact design
accordingly. Details on the artefact design and development are provided in section 4.
3.4 Evaluation Stage
For the evaluation stage of DSRM, we evaluated our purposeful artefact with a criteria-based
evaluation as to whether it meets its requirements, as described further below. Further
evaluations for usability, utility, etc., is still needed. Details on the artefact evaluation are
provided in section 5.
3.5 Conclusion Stage
The conclusion stage of DSRM was reached when the artefact reached a state where we
judged that the artefact is sufficiently useful for its purpose to conclude the research, report
the outcomes (thus far), and contribute to the on-going discourse on DSR risk management in
the DSR research community. We trust that further work will lead to even better artefacts for
managing risk in DSR.
4 Design of TRiDS (DSRM stages 1-3)
This section describes the design of the purposeful artefact, as suggested by Gregor and
Hevner (2013). To do so, this section follows the structure of the first three stages of the
DSRM methodology (Vaishnavi & Kuechler, 2004, 2015). Section 4.1 completes the
Awareness of Problem stage, which was begun in the introduction to this paper, by specifying
requirements for TRiDS. Section 4.2 describes the Suggestion stage and section 4.3 provides
a description of and rationale for the TRiDS artefact, to convey the Development stage of
DSRM.
4.1 Requirements for TRiDS (DSRM stage 1)
The scope of the problem to be solved – the lack of comprehensive guidance and advice
(especially for novice DSR researchers) concerning treatments for known DSR risks – was
described and justified in the introduction to this paper. Based on that scope, we were able to
proceed with developing what became TRiDS.
However, in order to solve a problem, it is useful to specify the requirements for solving the
problem. Setting out the requirements for a solution and designing a solution to meet them
enables solving the problem.
Therefore, we formulated and agreed upon the following five requirements for TRiDS based
on the identified scope of extending RMF4DSR to provide needed guidance to novice DSR
researchers on specific treatments for reducing and managing DSR risks.
1. Provide as comprehensive a list of all risks relevant to DSR projects as possible, i.e. possibly extending the
checklists of known risks provided in RMF4DSR (Pries-Heje et al., 2014a).
2. Identify treatments for all DSR risks identified (comprehensive coverage of risks), including both those
already in RMF4DSR and any other DSR risks identified in point #1 above. For every known risk, at least
one potential treatment should be identified.
3. Identify a range of different kinds of treatments or treatment strategies. Having more than one suggestion for
potential treatments of a DSR risk would improve the flexibility and utility of the purposeful artefact.
4. Where possible, identify treatments in each of the four risk management quadrants (self-insure, transfer, self-
protect, and avoidance) found in RMF4DSR (Pries-Heje et al., 2014a).
5. Support users to easily identify specific candidate treatments for each particular DSR risk.
Later, during further review of relevant research in seeking potential treatments and in
reviewing the general risk management literature and classifications of risk treatments, as
noted in section 2.3.1, we identified that RMF4DSR does not address the four kinds of
controls suggested by Hopkin (2017). This suggests that TRiDS could try to identify
treatments to cover the breadth of the four different controls for the self-protect/treat quadrant
of controls. This led us to add a six requirement for what became TRiDS:
6. Where possible, identify controls of all four types (preventive, corrective, directive, and detective) for use in
the self-protect/treat quadrant of assessed risks.
4.2 Suggestion Phase and Solution Alternatives (DSRM stage 2)
In the suggestion phase, we next considered how to approach the problem. As introduced in
section 3, our first approach was to brainstorm ideas for treatments for each and every DSR
risk identified in RMF4DSR. Ideas came from many areas in the literature as well as the
authors’ DSR experience and through considering each of the four quadrants of risk
treatments in RMF4DSR (Pries-Heje et al., 2014a), i.e. self-insure, transfer, self-protect, and
avoidance, as well as the four kinds of controls in Hopkin (2017), i.e. preventive, corrective,
directive, and detective.
Many key ideas were drawn from the extant approaches in the literature on DSR guidelines,
as discussed in section 2.1.1, the DSR evaluation literature (Venable et al. (2012, 2016),
Sonnenberg & Vom Brocke, (2012b)), as discussed in section 2.1.2, and in the DSR risk
management literature, as discussed in section 2.1.3. The idea of a treatment to manage key
DSR guidelines followed directly from the DSR guideline literature. Venable et al. (2012,
2016), as well as Sonnenberg and vom Brocke (2012b), provided the idea that risks can be
reduced through early evaluation and good evaluation strategies should consider potential
areas of risk. The Pries-Heje et al. (2014a) paper on RMF4DSR provided a small number of
example DSR risk treatments.
However, we also drew on several other areas of extant literature as reviewed in section 2.2,
including general and IS risk management, user participation and participatory development,
software engineering (specifically software engineering reviews) literature, on how to
conduct literature reviews, change management, and problem analysis and solving.
Additionally, we drew on the research and system development knowledge and experience of
the authors to identify other candidate treatments.
4.3 Design and Development of TRiDS (DSRM stage 3)
As described earlier, we developed TRiDS by first brainstorming and documenting all of the
different treatments, risk by risk drawing on RMF4DSR. In doing so, we further identified
five other DSR risks not found in RMF4DSR. These were added to the RMF4DSR risk
checklists at the appropriate point and relevant treatments identified.
Once we had lists of treatments for each risk, we further considered how to make
identification of candidate treatments easy once a particular risk was selected to be treated.
We also needed to consider how to provide advice to novice researchers on what a specific
treatment actually means and how to enact that specific treatment once selected. We noted
that a number of specific treatments were similar and some could clearly be applied to a
number of different risks. This led us to reflect on the range of different treatments and to
group treatments conceptually into different classes. Based on that, we are able to provide a
description of a group or class of treatments and general advice and literature on how to enact
treatments within that class.
The resulting purposeful artefact, which we have named Treatments for Risk in Design
Science (TRiDS), has four main parts.
The first part is comprised of six Extended DSR Risks Checklists, which make minor
extensions to the checklists in RMF4DSR. Table 1 below shows the additional DSR risks we
identified. The intention is that the design science researcher will use these extended
checklists in the same manner as in RMF4DSR, to identify, analyse, and prioritise DSR risks
for which treatments are needed.
The second part is a DSR Treatment List, which lists and explains the 46 different treatments
that we identified. Each treatment is a candidate for application for one or more DSR risks.
The third part is a DSR Risk Treatments Lookup Table. This table matches DSR risks to
candidate DSR treatments, but is organised by DSR risk, so a DSR researcher can easily look
up potential (candidate) DSR risk treatments for any particular (and relevant, sufficiently
high priority DSR risk, as determined using the RMF4DSR procedure.
Finally, the fourth part is a classification of the different kinds of treatments. This facilitates
providing a succinct summary of each class of treatment and references to relevant literature.
Sections 4.3.1-4.3.4 below describe each of the four components of TRiDS.
4.3.1 TRiDS Extended DSR Risks Checklists
As noted earlier, during the development of TRiDS, we identified several DSR risks that
were not expressly included in the DSR Risk Checklists in Pries-Heje et al. (2014a). Table 1
below identifies the additional risks that we have added to the Pries-Heje et al. (2014a) DSR
Risk Checklists. Pries-Heje et al. (2014a) divided risks into six different categories (A.
Business needs, B. Grounding, C. Build purposeful artefacts, D. Evaluate design artefacts and
justify design theories or knowledge, E. Artefact dissemination and use, F. Knowledge
additions). The full Extended DSR Risks Checklists (including the original RMF4DSR risks
and the additional risks below) is provided in Appendix A.
Table 1. Additional risks in the TRiDS Extended DSR Risk Checklists
4.3.2 TRiDS Treatment List
During our brainstorming and review and revision of different DSR risk treatments, we
identified 46 different treatments, which could be used at appropriate points in a DSR project
to address the risks in the Extended DSR Risks Checklists described above. Table 2 below
lists and briefly describes each of the treatments, as well as listing the relevant risks to which
each treatment could be applied. Treatments in Table 2 are listed in the order of the earliest
risk to which they apply, e.g. a treatment that applies to risk A-1 is listed before a treatment
that doesn’t apply to risk A-1 – and so on. Some of the treatments come from or are adapted
from treatments in the DSR literature and references are provided where relevant.
Table 2. TRiDS Treatment List (with relevant risks)
#
Detailed Risk Treatment
Relevant Risks
1.
Systematic literature review about the problem,
existing solutions, and technological capabilities
that could be used for solution
A-1, A-2, A-3, A-4, A-5, A-6, A-7,
A-8, B-1, B-2, B-3
2.
Empirical investigation of the problem (e.g.
using survey, case study), cf. Pries-Heje et al.
(2014a), p. 15
A-1, A-2, A-3, A-4, A-5, A-6, A-7,
A-8, D-1b
New Risk Number
Additional Risk Description
A-9
Inappropriate choice of meta-requirements (scoping error)
D-13
Type I evaluation error (false positive) (Baskerville et al., 2011)
D-14
Type II evaluation error (false negative) (Baskerville et al., 2011)
E-5
Unsafe artefact released
F-5
Unsafe artefact design published
3.
Seek co-authors or clients with expertise in and
understanding of the problem area and its
significance
A-1, A-2, A-3, A-4, A-5, A-6, A-7,
A-8, B-1, B-2, B-3, C-5, C-6, C-7,
D-1a
4.
Stakeholder analysis
A-3, A-4, A-5, A-6, A-7, A-8
5.
Causal analysis (a.k.a. root cause analysis)
A-3, A-4, A-5, A-9
6.
CATWOE/Root definition
A-6, A-7, A-8, A-9
7.
Requirements choice review
A-9
8.
Link requirements to desired outcomes (causal
analysis)
A-9
9.
Update literature review, open automatic query
B-1, B-2, B-3
10.
Seek co-authors or clients with expertise in
extant purposeful artefact solutions to the
problem
B-2, C-4, C-5, C-6, C-7
11.
Seek co-authors or clients with expertise in
technologies to be applied in new purposeful
artefact
B-2, C-1, C-3
12.
Seek co-authors with expertise in behavioural
theory or other areas of potential kernel theory
B-3
13.
Review solution idea and design with technical
experts
C-1
14.
Generate multiple candidate designs and
contingency plans, cf. Pries-Heje et al. (2014a),
p. 14
C-1, C-2, C-3, C-4, C-5, C-6, C-7,
D-1a, D-1b, E-1
15.
Evaluate early and formatively, cf. Pries-Heje et
a. (2014a, p. 14), Abraham et al. (2014)
C-1, C-2, C-3, C-4, C-5, C-6, C-7
16.
Review solution idea and design with potential
users, cf. Pries-Heje et al. (2014a), p. 15
C-2, C-3, C-4, C-6, C-7, D-1a, D-
1b
17.
Review partial prototypes as early as possible
with users, cf. Pries-Heje et al. (2014a), 15
C-5, D-1a, D-1b
18.
Review solution idea and design with non-user
stakeholders, especially with power and different
interests
C-6, C-7
19.
Ask “Devil’s Advocate” question: “How and
why could use of the artefact make a situation
worse rather than better?”
C-7
20.
Triangulate evaluations using different forms, cf.
Pries-Heje et al. (2014a), p. 14
C-7, D-13, D-14, E-1, E-5, F-1, F-3
21.
Ask “Devil’s Advocate” question: “How and
why might the artefact fail to match the
requirements?”
D-2
22.
Design and document the design carefully using
template/meta-design-driven design &
documentation, cf. Pries-Heje et al. (2014a), p.
15
D-2, D-3, D-4, D-5
23.
Design review
D-3, D-4
24.
Instantiation review
D-5
25.
Early (partial) prototype review
D-6
26.
Post-implementation review
D-6
27.
Ask naturalistic evaluation stakeholders about
potential and forecast changes (when
D-7, D-12
investigating the problem for naturalistic
evaluation)
28.
Develop and deliver the working purposeful
artefact for naturalistic evaluation quickly
D-7, D-12
29.
Seek co-authors with expertise in evaluation
methods
D-7, D-9, D-10, D-11, D-13, D-14,
E-1, E-5, F-1
30.
Plan a good change management practice for
naturalistic evaluation
D-8
31.
Involve users early and often (a.k.a. user and
stakeholder participation) for naturalistic
evaluation, cf. Pries-Heje et al. (2014a), p. 15
D-8, D-9, D-10, D-11, D-12
32.
Identify and resolve disagreements among
stakeholders (during problem formulation and/or
change management)
D9, D-10, D-11, D-12
33.
Support and guide implementers (post research)
to implement the purposeful artefact properly
E-1, E-2, E-3, E-4
34.
Rigorously evaluate for (unsafe) side effects, cf.
Pries-Heje et al. (2014a), p. 15
E-1, E-5, F-1, F-3, F-5
35.
Help implementers to conduct proper change
management
E-4
36.
Throughout the DSR project, actively clarify and
manage (plan, review/monitor, and re-plan) the
significance of the problem
F-1, F-2
37.
Throughout the DSR project, actively clarify and
manage (plan, review/monitor, and re-plan) the
newness/novelty of the artefact
F-1
38.
Throughout the DSR project, actively clarify and
manage (plan, review/monitor, and re-plan) the
rigour of the evaluation
F-1, F-3
39.
Throughout the DSR project, actively clarify and
manage (plan, review/monitor, and re-plan) the
relationship of the problem and the extant
artefact to extant theory and the literature
F-1
40.
Seek co-authors to distribute the workload and
the risk, cf. Pries-Heje et al. (2014a), p. 15
F-1, F-2
41.
Change the scope of the research to something
less risky, cf. Pries-Heje et al. (2014a), p. 15
F-1, F-2
42.
Abandon the research if too risky, cf. Pries-Heje
et al. (2014a), p. 14
F-1, F-2
43.
Enter into contract/agreement clarifying IP rights
and right to publish, cf. Pries-Heje et al. (2014a),
p. 18
F-1
44.
Ask “Devil’s Advocate” question: “How and
why might this research produce incorrect
results?”
F-3
45.
Ask “Devil’s Advocate” question (during design
and design review): “How and why could the
F-4
artefact be (or become) too unique to
disseminate?”
46.
Ask experts whether the design is too unique to
be used in other contexts (during design review)
F-4
47.
Revise the scope or topic of the research
4.3.3 TRiDS Risks and Treatments Lookup Table
Having introduced all the DSR risk treatments that we identified, we inverted table 2 so that
it is easily searchable by risk to look up candidate risk treatments for any particular risk.
Table 3 provides that capability. Unfortunately, space limitations prevent providing
explanations of the risks and treatments in Table 3, so only the risk numbers and treatment
numbers are included. All DSR risks identified in RMF4DSR and in this paper are present in
table 3 and we have identified at least one risk treatment for all of them. All of the risk
treatments are described in detail in table 2 above.
Table 3. TRiDS Risks and Treatments Lookup Table
Risk Treatments
DSR
Risk
Risk Treatments
1, 2, 3
D-3
22, 23
1, 2, 3
D-4
22, 23
1, 2, 3, 4, 5
D-5
22, 24
1, 2, 3, 4, 5
D-6
25, 26
1, 2, 3, 4, 5
D-7
27, 28, 29
1, 2, 3, 4, 6
D-8
30, 31
1, 2, 3, 4, 6
D-9
29, 31, 32
1, 2, 3, 4, 6
D-10
29, 31, 32
1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8
D-11
29, 31, 32
1, 3, 9
D-12
27, 28, 31, 32
1, 3, 9, 10, 11
D-13*
20, 29
1, 3, 9, 12
D-14*
20, 29
11, 13, 14, 15
E-1
14, 20, 29, 33, 34
14, 15, 16
E-2
33
11, 14, 15, 16
E-3
33
10, 14, 15, 16
E-4
33, 35
3, 10, 14, 15, 17
E-5*
20, 29, 34
3, 10, 14, 15, 16, 18
F-1
20, 29, 34, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42,
43
3, 10, 14, 15, 16, 18,
19, 20
F-2
36, 40, 41, 42
3, 14, 16, 17
F-3
20, 34, 38, 44
2, 14, 16, 17
F-4
45, 46
21, 22
F-5*
20, 29, 34
The asterisks in table 3 indicate new risks introduced in TRiDS.
4.3.4 TRiDS DSR Risk Treatments Classification and Guidance
The DSR risk treatments in Table 2 are listed in order of risks and similar types of treatments
are not grouped together. In this section, we classify different treatments, provide further
explanation about them where needed, and provide references to literature for further
explanation and guidance for how to conduct the treatments.
Within the list of DSR risk treatments above, some treatments are similar to others and can be
grouped into classes. We identified 14 generic classes of DSR risk treatments, including (1)
Literature Reviews, (2) conducting Empirical Studies, (3) applying Problem Analysis
Techniques, (4) encouraging Participation, (5) conducting Reviews, (6) following established
Design Practices, (7) following established DSR Evaluation Guidance, (8) applying Change
Management practices, (9) using Project Management techniques, (10) seeking Expert
Advice, (11) seeking Co-Authorship, (12) asking (and answering) Devil’s Advocate
Questions, (13) Managing Critical DSR Quality Guidelines, and (14) Changing Project
Scope. Some treatments fall into more than one category. We introduce each of these risk
treatment categories and categorise them as self-insure, self-protect, transfer, or avoidance in
sections 6.4.1-6.4.14.
4.3.4.1
Literature Reviews (treatments 1 and 9):
Much has been written in the IS field about rigorous literature reviews, including work by
Webster and Watson (2002), Jennex (2015) and vom Brocke et al. (2015). Effective search
queries are essential (e.g. not relying on only one or a few specific keywords, not limiting the
search to a subset of academic outlets, and ignoring current practices and artefacts available
from vendors or consultants or used in industry). Also essential is tracking how the literature
search was conducted for future reference and expansion. Modern search systems also
provide the feature of open queries or alerts, which notify the user when new publications
meeting search criteria become available. See, e.g., Google Scholar. Moreover, a good
literature search may identify kernel theories (Walls et al., 1992), or justificatory knowledge
(Gregor & Jones, 2007) that through abduction in the suggestion phase (Vaishnavi &
Kuechler, 2004, 2015) can be adapted to address the problem to be solved. Conducting
thorough literature searches and reviews is a preventive form of self-protection (a.k.a. treat)
as it reduces the likelihood and impact of risks.
For example, in ongoing research involving one of the authors on managing complexity in
project management, the core of the artefact design was suggested and heavily influenced by
literature on the nature of complexity and how to deal with it, including papers from the non-
academic, practitioner literature.
4.3.4.2
Empirical Studies (treatments 2 and 20):
Relying solely on the literature may not be appropriate, particularly for understanding
problems (which may change over time). Empirically evaluating purposeful artefacts and
design theories needs to be carefully designed, using tried and true approaches such as
triangulation rather than relying solely on one evaluation approach or episode. Studying a
problem empirically is another preventive form of self-protection. Empirical formative
evaluation is a detective form of self-protection, which enables corrective treatment through
redesign (or possibly through revising the scope of a DSR study). Designing formative and
summative evaluations according to recommended practice is a directive form of self-
protection.
For example, in ongoing research involving one of the authors on developing an approach for
how to enhance and facilitate university collaboration with not-for-profit organisations,
surveys of university staff and students were conducted to identify their willingness to
collaborate (e.g. in work-integrated learning (WIL) and collaborative research) and to
identify potential issues relating to feasibility and needed features.
4.3.4.3
Problem Analysis Techniques (treatments 4, 5, 6, 7, 27, and 32):
Understanding problems, which are always perceived, and agreeing about them are important
in a problem-solving paradigm like DSR. Much has been written about analysing and
achieving shared understanding of problems, including work by Peter Checkland and
colleagues on Soft Systems Methodology (Checkland, 1981; Checkland & Scholes, 1990),
other work about problem analysis and solving methods (e.g. Flood & Jackson (1991);
Rosenhead & Mingers (2001)), and work on causal analysis for DSR (Venable, 2014).
Careful problem analysis, from different perspectives, is a form of preventive, but also
directive self-protection.
For example, Venable and Travis (2000) made use of stakeholder analysis techniques and
rich pictures when developing a proposal for a community-based IS Digital Library system
and bringing it to the IFIP community for discussion.
4.3.4.4
Participation (treatments 3, 10, 11, 16, 17, 18, 27, 31 and 32):
Participation by stakeholders, including users, beneficiaries, and decision makers is useful (if
not essential) throughout all phases of DSR. The literature above on problem analysis and
solving stresses participation. Various DSR methods have also been developed that stress
participation, including and Action Design Research (ADR - Sein et al., 2011), Participatory
Action Design Research (PADR - Bilandzic & Venable, 2011), Soft Design Science
Methodology (SDSM - Pries-Heje et al., 2014b), and a different version of Participatory
Action Design Research (PADRE - Haj-Bolouri et al., 2016). Using a participative analysis
and design approach is a form of preventive, but also directive self-protection.
For example, in his PhD thesis research, Bilandzic (Bilandzic, 2013) undertook two cycles of
PADR, involving extensive participation from (and co-design by) members of a community
group, to develop a rich understanding a particular context of connected learning and to
develop and evaluate two artefacts, Hack The Evening, a social intervention, and Gelatine, a
custom-developed ambient media system (for connected/social learning). Heavy participation
from stakeholders ensured that their needs were met and that the artefact was rigorously (and
authentically) evaluated by those whom it was intended to benefit.
4.3.4.5
Reviews (treatments 8, 13, 16, 17, 18, 23, 24, 25, 26, 36, 37, 38, 39, 45, and 46):
Formal (or semi-formal) reviews can be conducted at any stage of a DSR project on any of
the artefacts developed along the way. The Software Engineering literature describes
practices and standards for the conduct of reviews. E.g., see Pressman & Maxim (2015) and
Sommerville (2015). Reviews are a detective form of self-protection. Errors or inadequacies
identified through reviews enable redesign, a corrective form of self-protection.
For example, many PhD programs have formal review points during a program, e.g. at the
stage of proposal approval, at a mid-way stage, and at a point soon before thesis submission.
Moreover, some places organise colloquium style peer reviews. However, such general
approaches can be extended to review intermediate design artefacts, such as of problem
analyses, solution requirements, initial or detailed designs, prototypes, of components of a
larger design. Following prescribed practices and identifying quality criteria beforehand to be
applied during a review are good practices.
4.3.4.6
Design Practices (treatments 14, 20, 23, and 28):
There is extensive literature on how to design quality into software and other artefacts. See
the software engineering books listed above for reviews as well as journals such as Design
Research. Vaishnavi and Kuechler (2015) suggest a large number of DSR design patterns.
Moreover, they also reproduce 40 “inventive principles” (Appendix 6A, pages 146-149) from
TRIZ (Altschuller, 2005). Following good design practices is a form of directive self-
protection.
For example, Vaishnavi and Kuechler (2015), in their discussion of the suggestion phase of
the example case of the Smart Objects DSR project (Vaishnavi et al., 1997), noted how
following the engineering design principles of partitioning the system into different objects
and separating control information from domain information within each object led to a better
design, which allowed domain experts to more easily review the correctness of the
implementation of a system supporting a complex hierarchy of rules (e.g. for the control
system for a nuclear power plant).
4.3.4.7
Evaluation Guidance (treatments 15, 16, 17, 20, 25, 27, 28, and 34):
As described earlier, the DSR literature provides substantial guidance for evaluation in DSR.
See Venable et al. (2012, 2016), Sonnenberg and vom Brocke (2012a, 2012b), or Prat et al.
(2015). Early evaluation is a key lesson (Abraham et al., 2014). Early (formative) and
thorough evaluations are a detective form of self-protection. It is also an important form of
self-insurance as it allows more time to recover (through redesign, a corrective treatment)
should a risk (such as a failed evaluation) eventuate.
For example, the Framework for Evaluation in Design Science (FEDS) (Venable et al., 2016)
currently has over 250 citations on Google Scholar.
4.3.4.8
Change Management (treatments 30, 33, and 35):
The fields of management and information systems have both studied change management
extensively and provide guidance for how to accomplish it successfully. See, e.g., the paper
by By (2005). Following good change management practices is a directive, but also a
preventive form of self-protection.
For example, Bider et al. (2012) describe the importance of change management in DSR and
provide some useful suggestions for a change management process and various change
management practices.
4.3.4.9
Project Management (28, 41, 42, and 43):
In many important ways, a DSR project is just like any other project, and basic project
management practices can be very useful to help ensure successful DSR projects and avoid
common DSR project pitfalls. See, e.g., vom Brocke and Lippe (2010, 2013) and Lippe and
vom Brocke (2016). Although not specialised to DSR, the Memorial University of
Newfoundland provides guidance for managing research projects at https://research-
tools.mun.ca/rpm/. Good project management is a key form of directive self-protection.
Scheduling slack time in the project plan is also a key form of self-insurance for a project.
For example, Kearns and Finn (2017) give an example how not carefully considering whether
an activity (publishing a paper on a side topic) was within the scope of the research project
led to a four-month delay in a research project. Their excellent book, Supervising PhD
Students, provides a wealth of straightforward, practical advice about planning, organising,
monitoring, and controlling a research project, which is highly applicable whether you are a
supervisor or not.
4.3.4.10
Expert Advice (treatments 3, 10, 11, 12, 13, 29, and 46):
For researchers who are not themselves experts in one or more areas relevant to a DSR
project, seeking and obtaining expert advice can be a very useful way to minimise key risks.
Key areas of expertise might be in the problem to be solved, known extant approaches to the
problem, technologies that might be employed, and DSR research and change management
methods. Expert advice is a form of preventive self-protection, but is to some extent also a
transfer tactic (by transferring some of the risk to experts).
For example, Reiterer (2018), in preparing his PhD thesis developing and evaluating an
ontology of DSR concepts to be used for storing, searching, and retrieving DSR knowledge,
sought advice from both DSR experts and ontology experts. He also published preliminary
research-in-progress papers and obtained valuable feedback and suggestions from expert
conference attendees.
4.3.4.11
Co-Authorship (treatments 3, 10, 11, 12, 29, and 40):
A common practice used to obtain expertise is to invite an expert to join the project as a co-
author. This also has the advantage of distributing the risk (and workload) across multiple
individuals. Adding co-authors may complicate working arrangements, but is often well
worth it. Co-authorship is a key form of transfer (of some of the risk).
For example, one might bring in an expert in statistical analyses to conduct and write up the
analysis part of a DSR paper with a quantitative approach to evaluating the artefact.
4.3.4.12
Devil's Advocate Questions (treatments 19, 21, 44, and 45):
The Devil’s Advocate (Latin: Advocatus Diaboli) was a formal position within the Roman
Catholic church, whose task was to argue against the canonization of people under
consideration for sainthood (Wikipedia, 2018). The idea is extended to mean “someone who
pretends, in an argument or discussion, to be against an idea or plan that a lot of people
support, in order to make people discuss and consider it in more detail”
(Cambridge_Dictionary, 2018). A popular corollary expression to that is to seriously (as
opposed to flippantly) ask “What could possibly go wrong?” James A. Senn (Senn, 1981),
when considering a system development project, would ask and consider “Under what
circumstances would implementing the system actually make things worse rather than
better?” In our list, we suggest asking similar “Devil’s Advocate” questions about different
parts of a DSR project. Devil’s advocate questions are similar to evaluations, but through
thought experiments; they provide some detective self-protection, but also self-insurance
when they are asked early enough to discover problems while there is still time to solve them
(i.e. take corrective redesign).
For example, the earlier example of empirical research into staff and student willingness to
participate in collaborations between not-for-profit organisations and a university arose out of
asking Devil’s Advocate questions like “What if academic staff don’t want to collaborate
with not-for-profit organisations on research, e.g. because they don’t have money to fund
research?” Similarly, one wonders if the design of automated systems for handling customer
queries might have been different if the designers had asked: “How might automated phone-
based customer service actually reduce business more than the anticipated cost savings of not
having real people answer phones?” The design of early email systems might have been
different if the designers had asked: “How might being able to copy an email once to multiple
addressees actually make email less rather than more useful?”
4.3.4.13
Manage Critical DSR Quality Guidelines (treatments 36, 37, 38, 39):
The DSR literature suggests a number of guidelines and recommendations for what makes
criteria for quality (or satisfactory) DSR. The most commonly advocated are the seven
guidelines in Hevner et al. (2004). Managing the achievement of critical guidelines is a good
way to help overcome risks and ensure DSR project success. Of the seven Hevner et al.
guidelines, in accordance with Venable (2010, 2015), we chose guidelines 1, 2, 3, and 4 as
critical, but also add a fifth guideline: ensuring that the purposeful artefact is clearly and
explicitly related to the literature and relevant theory (i.e. it has theoretical significance).
Ensuring that you focus attention on key guidelines for a DSR project is a directive form of
self-protection, as well as self-insurance by allowing time to reallocate resources to corrective
redesign if a problem is discovered.
For example, Chau (2011) explicitly states how all seven of the guidelines by Hevner et al.
(2004) are addressed in the research reported in his paper. Of course, managing the
achievement of the guidelines during the project would make it easier to report when writing
up a paper. Making explicit statements about achieving the guidelines isn’t required, but the
achievement of the first four Hevner et al. guidelines – as well as our guideline to ensure the
work is clearly related to the literature – must be apparent within a paper, so must have been
done during the research.
4.3.4.14 Changing Project Scope or Topic
Revising (especially reducing) the scope or revising the topic of the research is often an
effective (and sometimes the only) successful strategy when encountering significant project
risks. Reducing the scope may be used to eliminate a particularly risky area of the project,
e.g. by solving a smaller, more specific problem or reducing the scope of the solution being
attempted. Doing so may reduce the significance of the project, but the project significance
may still be acceptable. Sometimes it may even require abandoning a project altogether and
pursuing a different project. Changing the project topic or scope is an avoidance tactic.
However, it can only be practised early – either up front or in response to discovering a
problem. Planning ahead for flexibility in changing the scope of a DSR project is a prudent
way to plan for using avoidance (or termination in the 4 Ts terminology) if it becomes
necessary.
For example, Riedmann et al.’s (2013) work on a RIVALE prototype of a virtual case study
for learning and practising requirements elicitation originally planned to use voice
recognition, but it was decided that voice recognition wasn’t reliable enough and was difficult
to integrate into a virtual world. Because the project scope was adequate without it (users
could simply type their interaction instead), that capability was simply excluded from the
research.
In another example, the PhD work mentioned earlier by Reiterer originally intended to write
software that would automatically analyse DSR publications to identify instances of the DSR
concepts and automatically populate the DSR knowledge base. However, the state of the art
of semantic analysis (and the amount of effort required to advance it sufficiently) made such
research infeasible within available resources. Therefore, the scope was changed to a more
limited scope that was feasible for a PhD project with the available resources.
Changing, especially reducing, the scope can be an effective way to keep a DSR research
project on track. Other reasons for changing the scope include (1) you identify new research
that already has done what you intended to do, (2) new approaches or technologies become
available, or (3) interest in a slightly different topic (particularly if funded!) motivates
revising the scope to address the related topic.
5 Evaluation of TRiDS (DSRM stage 4)
This paper identified six requirements for TRiDS in section 4.1. The six requirements are
repeated here for ease of reference.
1. Provide as comprehensive a list of all risks relevant to DSR projects as possible, i.e.
possibly extending the checklists of known risks provided in RMF4DSR (Pries-Heje et
al., 2014a).
2. Identify treatments for all DSR risks identified (comprehensive coverage of risks),
including both those already in RMF4DSR and any other DSR risks identified in point #1
above. For every known risk, at least one potential treatment should be identified.
3. Identify a range of different kinds of treatments or treatment strategies. Having more than
one suggestion for potential treatments of a DSR risk would improve the flexibility and
utility of the purposeful artefact.
4. Where possible, identify treatments in each of the four risk management quadrants (self-
insure, transfer, self-protect, and avoidance) found in RMF4DSR (Pries-Heje et al.,
2014a).
5. Support users to easily identify specific candidate treatments for each particular DSR risk.
6. Where possible, identify controls of all four types (preventive, corrective, directive, and
detective) for use in the self-protect/treat quadrant of assessed risks.
5.1 Criteria-based evaluation
Criteria-based evaluation (Venable et al., 2016; Venable & Travis, 1996) is a form of
artificial (non-naturalistic, i.e. it does not evaluate in real use (Sun & Kantor, 2006))
evaluation. Criteria-based evaluation is appropriate when there are criteria concerning the
artefact that can be objectively observed and confirmed or disconfirmed. Each of the six
requirements identified above can be objectively confirmed or disconfirmed in the design for
TRiDS. We evaluated whether each of the six requirements is met below.
The first requirement is to provide a comprehensive list of risks, including extra risks
identified in this paper. The list of extra risks is provided in table 1 and the rest can be found
in the checklists in section 2.1.3, which are from Pries-Heje et al. (2014a). While
comprehensiveness is a requirement, it is also an issue that such a list should be
parsimonious, i.e. not including risks that don’t warrant attention, e.g. by being too esoteric,
unlikely, or overly specific. The list is comprehensive with respect to sufficiently significant
risks in the literature and known to the authors. However, it is impossible to establish that
other DSR risks could not be identified in the future.
The second requirement is that all risks must have a treatment that applies to that risk. Table
3 above facilitates confirming this, as all risks are listed. Every risk in Table 3 has at least one
treatment.
The third requirement for TRiDS is to identify a range of different treatments. We judge that
having identified and included 14 different categories of treatments meets this requirement.
The fourth requirement is to (where possible) identify treatments in all four quadrants of risk
treatments: self-insure, self-protect, transfer, and avoidance. While self-protection treatments
dominate (mostly by reducing the probability of risks occurring), all four quadrants are
represented, but not for every risk, as this is not always appropriate or possible.
The fifth requirement that we decided for TRiDS is that it must support easily identifying
treatments for each risk. Table 3 is sorted by DSR risk, allowing easy look-up of relevant
treatments. Once a risk is identified (using RMF4DSR), the only thing needed then is to use
the treatment number to look up the treatment description in Table 2.
Finally, the sixth requirement we selected for TRiDS is to include candidate treatments from
all four types of controls (where possible). The classes of treatments discussed in section 4.3
cover not only all four quadrants, but for self-protection protection treatments, the controls
suggested include all four kinds: preventive, corrective, detective, and directive, although not
for every specific risk, as this is not always appropriate or possible.
5.2 Evaluation Summary
The criteria-based evaluation presented above demonstrates that TRiDS adequately meets all
of the requirements that we established for it early in its design. It is potentially debatable
whether the list of risks in the risks checklists (both from RMF4DSR and its extension in
TRiDS) is sufficiently comprehensive and parsimonious. We believe that it is. However, we
also caution that any list of potential risks may miss out on risks, some of which may only
arise in the future. Thus, relying totally on a risk checklist may not be appropriate.
We also note that requirements 4 and 6 concern having a range of optional treatments for
each and every risk. TRiDS does not provide options in all cases. For many kinds of risks in
DSR, only limited options may be available. That said, many risks have a wide variety of
treatments available, as identified in table 3.
Importantly, the above criteria-based, artificial evaluation (meeting requirements) does not
yet consider issues of usability, practicality, comprehensibility of potential treatments, and
other potential issues. Further naturalistic evaluation is needed with DSR researchers (student
or practising) on actual DSR projects. Such work is beyond the scope of this paper.
6 Discussion
This research has developed an approach for identifying risk treatments in DSR (TRiDS),
which extends prior research on DSR evaluation and risk management with additional
identified risks and recommendations for risk treatments. As discussed in section 5, TRiDS
meets the six requirements identified for how to provide more detailed guidance for how to
effectively and efficiently treat risks in DSR projects.
This paper identifies new risks in DSR, identifies and classifies treatments for DSR risks into
14 categories, and fills an important gap in the literature.
6.1 Theoretical significance
The knowledge developed in this paper can be formulated as a nascent design theory,
including new constructs of the artefact and for meeting the requirements of providing better
guidance for how to manage risk.
From a Design Theory perspective, TRiDS provides a general design (Baskerville & Pries-
Heje, 2010; Venable, 2013) of an artefact for matching DSR risks to candidate DSR
treatments, which can later be expanded with additional risks and treatments. The artefact’s
general design (an interacting set of components, e.g. tables) meets the general requirements
(Baskerville & Pries-Heje, 2010; Venable, 2013) to match risks and treatments through a
utility relationship between them for improved effectiveness and efficiency (Venable, 2006,
2013). Moreover, the approach could be generalised for use for risk management in other
domains than in DSR. Finally, the risks and risk treatments identified could be generalised to
other research paradigms than DSR. The design theory includes new constructs of the artefact
and increased utility (compared to extant approaches) for meeting the requirements of
providing better guidance for how to treat DSR risks.
6.2 Practical significance
Appropriate use of TRiDS, as described in this paper, should provide effective guidance to
DSR researchers, especially non-expert researchers, in managing the risks to their DSR
projects and/or programs, which should thereby increase the efficient use of resources and the
probability of a DSR project/program’s success. The use of TRiDS should enhance DSR and
help make it more efficacious, effective, efficient, and ethical. DSR, in turn, should better
serve society by delivering more and higher-quality contributions to the solution of real-
world problems.
6.3 Limitations
As noted earlier concerning the evaluation of TRiDS, while helpful, no checklist is complete
(so risks may be missed) and no treatment is guaranteed to work 100% of the time. Users of
RMF4DSR and TRiDS must be diligent in their application and consider how their DSR
project’s context might reduce the effectiveness of risk management approaches.
Another limitation of this work is that, while extending the risk list (Iversen et al., 2004)
provided by Pries-Heje et al (2014a) into a more specific risk-action list (Iversen et al., 2004),
it does not provide the strategic oversight offered by a risk-strategy model or a risk-strategy
analysis (Iversen et al., 2004). Future work might further extend RMF4DSR and TRiDS to
provide such strategic oversight.
7 Conclusion
The research reported in this paper extends the advice to DSR researchers on how to manage
risks in DSR projects/programs by identifying 47 potential treatments for known risks in
DSR. It also provides a straightforward way to work from a relevant risk – the augmented
risk checklists – to identify candidate treatments for a particular risk. It has further classified
the risk treatments into 14 categories, provided relevant examples, and made reference to
relevant literature to guide and support their enactment. Overall, it has extended the existing
literature in DSR risk management with some very practical ideas for how to address and
treat risks, which should assist DSR researchers to better manage risks in their DSR projects
and programs, and thus to better conduct DSR in terms of efficacy, effectiveness, efficiency,
and ethics.
However, further research would be useful. TRiDS could still use a more complete,
naturalistic evaluation. It could also benefit by supplementing it with better guidance on how
to decide among the treatments identified and how and when to apply the treatments
identified for best results.
Furthermore, TRiDS could be extended further. Ultimately, what we envision is an approach
to DSR that is risk-aware and identifies and treats risks in an agile and continuous way,
developing and evaluating intermediate artefacts rather than waiting for a summative
evaluation at the end of a linear research process. Such an approach should lead to DSR that
is both more effective (higher quality and more needed outcomes) and more efficient (less
wasted effort and rework).
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... Important milestones have been accomplished. These range from guidance on how to design DSR projects (Peffers et al., 2007), evaluate DSR artifacts (Sonnenberg & vom Brocke, 2012b, 2012aVenable et al., 2016), manage DSR projects (vom Brocke & Lippe, 2010), identify and mitigate risks in DSR projects (Venable et al., 2019), as well as building theory from DSR projects and publishing DSR results (Gregor & Hevner, 2013;Gregor & Jones, 2007). In this article, we aim to advance the current state of the field by sharing experience and providing guidance to further advance the practical relevance and societal value that DSR can make. ...
Chapter
Full-text available
Design science research (DSR) is an established research paradigm aiming to create design knowledge on innovative solutions for real-world problems. As such, DSR has the potential to contribute to the solution of real-world problems of great societal value. In this article, we discuss how DSR can maximize such practical impact. Reflecting on our long-standing collaboration with the globally operating Hilti company, we report on a rich empirical case and derive principles in order to increase the practical relevance and societal contribution of DSR projects. We also derive quality criteria through which DSR articles can demonstrate practical relevance and societal value contribution.
... How should the risks inherent in design science research be prioritized and treated? [25] How do we ensure reliability, safety and reporting, trustworthy certification? [16] How do we identify who performs governance activities and what are its boundaries? ...
Chapter
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... They build on prior work describing DSR activities within the overall DSR process, arguing that each of these activities progresses toward the intended artefacts differently and thus offer potential for concurrent (or formative) evaluation. Such evaluation can mitigate risk(Venable, vom Brocke, & Winter 2019), as early feedback on the minute steps leading to the eventual artefact can be incorporated into the design process. The authors also assert that this type of evaluation can be more specific and better directed if the evaluation focuses on the different aspects of design when relevant decisions are being made during the design process. ...
Chapter
Full-text available
Design Science Research (DSR) is a problem-solving paradigm that seeks to enhance human knowledge via the creation of innovative artifacts. Simply stated, DSR seeks to enhance technology and science knowledge bases via the creation of innovative artifacts that solve problems and improve the environment in which they are instantiated. The results of DSR include both the newly designed artifacts and design knowledge (DK) that provides a fuller understanding via design theories of why the artifacts enhance (or, disrupt) the relevant application contexts. The goal of this introduction chapter is to provide a brief survey of DSR concepts for better understanding of the following chapters that present DSR case studies.
... In this regard, descriptions of the six dimensions serve as boundary objects to facilitate discourse about how to scope and plan a DSR project. Thus, expectations management is supported so, for instance, Ph.D. students can align their goals with their supervisors and project partners alike, mitigating risk (Venable et al. 2019). ...
... In this regard, descriptions of the six dimensions serve as boundary objects to facilitate discourse about how to scope and plan a DSR project. Thus, expectations management is supported so, for instance, Ph.D. students can align their goals with their supervisors and project partners alike, mitigating risk(Venable et al. 2019).Editors and Reviewers:The six dimensions of a DSR project also facilitate dialogue with editors and reviewers, as the most important aspects of complex DSR projects can be characterized efficiently. Before going into detail, DSR contributions can be characterized based on a description of the six dimensions, facilitating communication and negotiation of the research's overall contribution and arrangement of activities. ...
Preprint
Full-text available
We propose six core dimensions of a Design Science Research (DSR) project that facilitate effective capture of the most relevant aspects of a DSR project to efficiently plan and communicate key considerations and conceptualizations of a DSR project. We represent these dimensions in the form of a DSR grid, a one-page visualization of the DSR project that is adjustable to the specific purpose for using the con-cept. We ground the six dimensions on existing research on the generation of design knowledge and illustrate them based on the articles that comprise this special issue on DSR. We show how fellow researchers, project partners, editors, reviewers, and the IS community as a whole can use the six core dimensions to support the improvement of DSR projects.
... In this regard, descriptions of the six dimensions serve as boundary objects to facilitate discourse about how to scope and plan a DSR project. Thus, expectations management is supported so, for instance, Ph.D. students can align their goals with their supervisors and project partners alike, mitigating risk(Venable et al. 2019).Editors and Reviewers:The six dimensions of a DSR project also facilitate dialogue with editors and reviewers, as the most important aspects of complex DSR projects can be characterized efficiently. Before going into detail, DSR contributions can be characterized based on a description of the six dimensions, facilitating communication and negotiation of the research's overall contribution and arrangement of activities. ...
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Full-text available
Design Science Research (DSR) is a promising research paradigm that intends to generate knowledge about innovative solutions to real-world problems. As such, DSR is specifically useful in researching the networked economy, where the design of digital platforms and ecosystems happens at an ever-increasing speed. However, DSR projects are complex, and multiple stakeholders should be involved in planning and communicating the research. For that purpose, we propose six core dimensions of a DSR project that facilitate effective capture of the most relevant aspects of a DSR project to efficiently plan and communicate key considerations and conceptualizations of a DSR project. We represent these dimensions in the form of a DSR grid, a one-page visualization of the DSR project that is adjustable to the specific purpose for using the concept. We ground the six dimensions on existing research on the generation of design knowledge and illustrate them based on the articles that comprise this special issue on DSR. We show how fellow researchers, project partners, editors, reviewers, and the IS community as a whole can use the six core dimensions to support the improvement of DSR projects.
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Designing effective methods of retrieving evidence-based clinical information for healthcare professionals’ decision making have always been challenging tasks for researchers in this field. Relevant existing studies have indicated significant limitations of implementing context-sensitive information retrieval services in healthcare organizations, but attempts are yet at their emergent stage for designing research-based solutions. In this paper, we design a new information retrieval architecture as a solution artifact useful in healthcare organizations for improving their information retrieval practices. Under the design science research paradigm, we outline a combined methodology that comprises design science research, design thinking and systems thinking for operating an iterative guiding process for developing and evaluating the new information retrieval approach. A total of 13 requirements that are linked to user-oriented theory of information need and fitness-utility model are captured. The new architecture is evaluated for its usefulness and fitness-utility using multi-case in-depth interviews that satisfy formalizing prescriptive knowledge on information retrieval.
Chapter
Effective and impactful design science research requires appropriate research conduct, and an appropriate research problem. Scholars in the DSR community continue to clarify the foundations for appropriate research conduct. In contrast, few guidelines or guardrails have been proposed to identify and develop research problems. Without such guidance, DSR efforts run the risk of pursuing problems that are either un-important or not-well-formulated. In this paper, I draw on writings beyond the DSR community to develop considerations that DSR scholars can use to identify and develop research problems, acknowledging their evolving ontological status. The paper describes an approach, articulates these considerations, and develops arguments that can help the identification and development of research problems for DSR efforts.
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Like all research projects, researchers should carefully plan and manage design projects to ensure valid and meaningful research outcomes. In this paper, we present the Design Canvas concept implemented in the MyDesignProcess. com platform. The Design Canvas captures the most important dimensions of a design project and displays them at a glance. In this paper, we describe the Design Canvas implementation in MyDesignProcess.com and illustrate with two exemplary design science research projects documented retrospectively its usage. Thereby, we illustrate how the Design Canvas can improve the structuring and communication of design projects.
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Ill-structured management problems are of paramount importance for organizations today. As they are complex to solve, they are undertaken by teams of diverse individuals who make use of tools to help them in solving such problems. Most tools either focus on supporting collaborative practices or are dedicated to solving specific ill-structured problems. In this paper, we bridge these two perspectives and provide design principles for tools that both support collaboration and are tailored for specific ill-structured problems. We derived these design principles from our participant observation of two critical cases of such collaborative tools: the Business Model Canvas and the Team Alignment Map. We lay the theoretical and design foundations for future developments of similar collaborative tools. Our paper illustrates the value that the IS discipline can bring to the increasing call for a design approach to management by rigorously developing tools for co-design.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Evaluation activities in Design Science Research not only verify utility but also scientific rigour and the truth-like value of prescriptive knowledge contributions. Assuming a lack of guidance, evaluation frameworks like the one of Sonnenberg and vom Brocke have been proposed prior to evaluating their actual utility to scholars. This research now aims at evaluating how scholars actually apply the framework in practice and their reasoning for doing so. The research-in-progress paper at hand presents preliminary results from a citation analysis. While we find an increasing awareness of the relevance of ex-ante evaluations, there is still a lack of comprehensive detail on ex-ante evaluation activities and an emphasis on ex-post evaluations in artificial settings. The call to accumulate incremental prescriptive knowledge has mostly been ignored and artifact changes are rarely disclosed. Therefore, we question the missing guidance as the sole reason that scholars emphasise building rather than evaluation. We propose to conduct a case study that investigates the reasons behind scholars' evaluation decisions.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Action Design Research (ADR) is a Design Research (DR) method that enriches the Design Science Research (DSR) paradigm, by providing stages and principles for designing artifacts and allowing for their emergence in an organizational context. The method has been used and elaborated by scholars, extending the mode of the method and its stages, incorporating and adopting knowledge from related approaches such as Participatory Action Research (PAR) and Participatory Design (PD). In this paper, we have adopted principles and philosophy from PAR and PD to extend and elaborate the ADR method, by providing a front-end of Action Research (AR) that emphasizes learning through incremental iteration. We will introduce our elaborated method as Participatory Action Design Research (PADRE) and demonstrate how we have used it in our own research. We argue that the ADR method can benefit from incorporating learning within and across each and every stage iteratively. We also argue that learning can be used as a learning nexus, which informs and gets accumulated for formalization of learning that can be re-used within different cycles of ADR. Hence, we introduce PADRE and provide a model that consists of a set of key-components, which extends and elaborates the ADR method.
Book
In its eighth edition, the book has again been revised and redesigned, undergoing a substantial content update that addresses new topics in what many have called “the engineering discipline of the 21st-century.” Entertaining and informative sidebars and marginal content have been expanded and make the book still easier-to-use in the classroom and as a self-study guide. Four new chapters, emphasizing software security and the unique challenges of developing software for mobile applications, have been added to this edition. In addition, new content has been added to many other chapters. The eighth edition is organized into 5 parts: • Part 1, The Software Process, presents both prescriptive and agile process models. • Part 2, Modeling, presents modern analysis and design methods with an emphasis on you UML-based modeling. • Part 3, Quality Management, addresses all aspects of software testing and quality assurance, formal verification techniques, and change management. • Part 4, Managing Software Projects, presents software topics that are relevant to those who plan, manage, and control a software project. • Part 5, Advanced Topics, presents dedicated chapters that address software process improvement and future software engineering trends.
Conference Paper
Design Science Research (DSR) is a research paradigm for research that undertakes to solve general problems through the invention and evaluation of new or improved technologies. Once DSR is completed, practitioners may make use of the new technology to solve particular instances of the generalised problem (and thereby make improvements in a problematic situation). In order to effectively solve a generalised problem, it is important (among other things) for DSR researchers to (1) understand the problem, its causes, and the conditions that allow a problem to continue or hinder its solution, (2) develop a shared problem understanding among collaborating DSR researchers, (3) creatively think of alternative potential avenues and means to solve (or reduce or alleviate) the problem, and (4) develop and convey design theories about the utility of a developed design artefact to solve a problem. This paper describes how Coloured Cognitive Mapping (CCM) can be used for these purposes in the context of DSR and provides evidence of its utility for those purposes through description of an application of CCM to DSR and more formal evaluation through teaching CCM to DSR researchers and surveying them for their opinions about its utility and features.
Conference Paper
Design Theory has been written about extensively in Information Systems (IS), but remains heavily problematic. Some researchers explicitly exclude design theory as an outcome of Design Science Research (DSR), others disagree about the form and purpose of design theories, many consider design theories to be too complicated to construct, some journal editors and researchers give low priority to design theory, and very few DSR publications propose design theories. This paper reviews and critically examines the IS literature on design theories, the nature of technological design artefacts compared to phenomena in the natural, biological, and social domains, and whether design theory is ‘prescriptive’ or ‘explanatory’. Using a DSR approach, the paper makes recommendations concerning the form and use of design theory, in order to move toward a resolution of the disagreements about design theory and progress the development of clearer and more useful formalisations of knowledge for practical use.
Article
The paper reviews the present processing systems offering information services: Database, Information Retrieval, Videotex and Question-Answering systems. Typical services, user's expectations and role, information types and structures are the main features discussed. In conclusion the general properties of a future integrated and user-friendly system are outlined.