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Systematic literature review of business model innovation in business ecosystems

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Abstract

In recent years, the concept of business models has gained popularity. This is especially the case since researchers can use the business model lens to investigate connections between single companies and their respective business ecosystems. However, the research on these connections is still fragmented and incomplete. In this article, we address this issue and report the results of a systematic literature review on the topics of business model innovation and business ecosystems. We performed a descriptive review of the subject and identified recurring themes in literature. Findings indicate that approaching business model innovation from a company-centric view might understate potentially far-reaching implications in business ecosystems. Subsequently, we contribute to the understanding of business model innovation in the context of business ecosystems.

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... The information obtained from this preliminary investigation allowed us to narrow the focus of our investigation. Based on the collected preliminary data as well as the results of a thorough review of relevant literature (Rachinger et al., 2019), we developed a priori constructs that guided our subsequent further research (Eisenhardt, 1989). Specifically, our preliminary empirical investigation indicated that complementors who provide solutions for xEV charging are perceived as bottlenecks in the xEV innovation ecosystem (Adner and Kapoor, 2010;Adner and Kapoor, 2016). ...
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