Article

Residents perceptions of non-dietary pesticide exposure risk. Knowledge gaps and challenges for targeted awareness-raising material in Italy

Authors:
  • Aeiforia (spin off company Catholic University of the Sacred Heart)
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Abstract

Currently there are no tools to accurately estimate pesticides exposure risk for residents and bystanders. European Member States have to develop specific measures and communication strategies to prevent and minimize non-occupational pesticides exposure. Moreover, these measures should be compliant with the requirements of the Directive on Sustainable Use of Pesticides. Unfortunately, there is a high degree of uncertainties in the assessment of the non-dietary exposure risk for residents, therefore risk communication passes through a deep understanding of exposure risk perception. The objective of this pilot study is to assess citizens' risk perception of non-dietary exposure to pesticides, and to assist policy-makers and risk communicators in developing targeted awareness-raising materials for residents and bystanders. Through a household survey, conducted in the rural area of the province of Piacenza (IT)we investigated knowledge, health risk perceptions, and information sources related to non-dietary exposure to agricultural pesticides in residents' indoor and outdoor environment. The factors that push individuals to give importance to several possible pollution sources and to mitigation measures or precaution, in order to protect themselves from possible exposure sources, were also investigated. Results show that even if the air quality of the residential area is not judged negatively, pesticides are perceived as air pollutants that could lead to an actual exposure and, are correlated to the health status. The perception of risk, however, does not seem to be dependent only on the distance between homes and fields. The interpretative hypothesis that the perception of the relationship between air quality and health is influenced by the cultural issue and by psycho-sensory factors and not supported by proper information, even if with some differences among age groups, it seems to be confirmed. To better transfer knowledge and communication, the commitment of those who are recognised as “competent” (doctors and researchers) is critical.

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... In the last 10 years however, residents' exposure has been an increasingly researched topic (Pubmed, 2021). This is likely due to growing concern among the population regarding pesticide usage (Calliera et al., 2019;Schaub et al., 2020;Zeitlin et al., 2021). But also due to efforts of policy makers to study residents' exposure (e.g. ...
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... The acceptance of pesticide treatment was somewhat unexpected, firstly because of its overall extent (52.2% of all participants were somewhat favorable to these interventions), but also for the diffuse agreement among younger participants [37]. However, it should be stressed that some previous reports have questioned the otherwise seemingly obvious restraints of younger age groups towards pesticides [45,46]. ...
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... In addition, the income gap and education gap are speculated as potential moderators of these relationships. The effects of scientific knowledge and risk perception on behavioral decision making are emphasized by previous literature [15][16][17]. An individual's chance of making mistakes can be influenced by incomplete knowledge when solving problems, because they may choose incorrect strategies [18]. ...
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One of the most perplexing problems in risk analysis is why some relatively minor risks or risk events, as assessed by technical experts, often elicit strong public concerns and result in substantial impacts upon society and economy. This article sets forth a conceptual framework that seeks to link systematically the technical assessment of risk with psychological, sociological, and cultural perspectives of risk perception and risk-related behavior. The main thesis is that hazards interact with psychological, social, institutional, and cultural processes in ways that may amplify or attenuate public responses to the risk or risk event. A structural description of the social amplification of risk is now possible. Amplification occurs at two stages: in the transfer of information about the risk, and in the response mechanisms of society. Signals about risk are processed by individual and social amplification stations, including the scientist who communicates the risk assessment, the news media, cultural groups, interpersonal networks, and others. Key steps of amplifications can be identified at each stage. The amplified risk leads to behavioral responses, which, in turn, result in secondary impacts. Models are presented that portray the elements and linkages in the proposed conceptual framework.
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This article reviews recent literature on the analysis of several contaminants related to the industrial development in indoor air in the framework of the REACH project. In this second part, the attention is focused on emergent contaminants and biocides. Among these chemicals, phthalates, polybrominated and phosphate flame retardants, fragrances, pesticides, as well as other emerging pollutants, are increasing their environmental and health concern and are extensively found in indoor air. Some of them are suspected to behave as priority organic pollutants (POPs) and/or endocrine disrupting compounds (EDC), and can be found both in air and associated to the suspended particulate matter (PM) and settled dust. Main literature considered for this review is from the last ten years, reporting analytical developments and applications regarding the considered contaminants in the indoor environment. Sample collection and pretreatment, analyte extraction or desorption, clean-up procedures, determination techniques, and performance results are summarized and discussed.
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Dati ambientali. La qualità dell´ambiente in Emilia-Romagna
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Professionals who can provide proper information about pesticide
  • Fig
Fig. 10. Professionals who can provide proper information about pesticide.
Pesticides and health risks
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