Chapter

Turkey’s entangled (energy) security concerns and the Cyprus question in the Eastern Mediterranean

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Abstract

The chapter aims to examine the reasons why those energy discoveries have failed to help bring peace to Cyprus. Drawing on Regional Security Complex Theory and Securitization Theory , it argues that the Eastern Mediterranean's peculiar regional characteristics, particularly those of Turkey, have created the political conditions for the securitization of these energy discoveries and their proposed export routes.

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... For instance, when NATO invited Cyprus to the NATO change of command ceremony Turkey boycotted the event (Cetin, 2019). Moreover, fearing marginalisation by the US-backed Eastern Mediterranean Gas corridor initiativeled by the EU, Greece, Cyprus, Israel, Egypt, and Qatar -, Turkey signed a maritime border agreement with Libya that consolidated its territorial claims over the Eastern Mediterranean waters (Iseri, 2019;Iseri & Bartan, 2019). It also established a drone base in Northern Cyprus to monitor natural gas drilling in the region (Iseri, 2019;Iseri & Bartan, 2019). ...
... Moreover, fearing marginalisation by the US-backed Eastern Mediterranean Gas corridor initiativeled by the EU, Greece, Cyprus, Israel, Egypt, and Qatar -, Turkey signed a maritime border agreement with Libya that consolidated its territorial claims over the Eastern Mediterranean waters (Iseri, 2019;Iseri & Bartan, 2019). It also established a drone base in Northern Cyprus to monitor natural gas drilling in the region (Iseri, 2019;Iseri & Bartan, 2019). ...
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İklim değişikliğinin etkilerini yakından hisseden ve yenilenebilir enerji potansiyeli yüksek bir bölge olan Doğu Akdeniz’de karar alıcıların sürdürülebilir enerji politikaları benimsemesi beklenirdir. Hâlbuki Türkiye ile Yunanistan deniz yetki alanları paylaşımı ihtilafı bulunan Kıbrıs açıklarındaki fosil yakıtların kontrolü için jeopolitik rekabet içerisindedir. Buradan hareketle ilgili çalışma öncelikle farklı enerji güvenliği yaklaşımlarını (liberal piyasalar/ticaret, jeopolitik ve çevresel) irdeleyecektir. Bu yaklaşımların ışığında, çalışma çeşitli güvenlik dinamiklerinin etkisindeki Doğu Akdeniz’deki egemen enerji jeopolitiği yaklaşımından, çevresele geçişin nasıl mümkün olabileceğinin izini sürecektir.
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