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Abstract

Women fake orgasm for partner-focused reasons and self-focused reasons, the latter of which include elevating their own sexual arousal. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between motivations for faking orgasm and orgasm consistency within the sexual activities of receiving oral sex and sexual intercourse among young adult women (N = 998). For both receiving oral sex and sexual intercourse, women who faked orgasm in order to elevate their own sexual arousal had greater orgasm consistency, whereas women who faked orgasm out of fear or insecurity had lower orgasm consistency. Overall, the results suggest that self-focused motivations for faking orgasm – particularly elevating arousal – are more closely associated with orgasm consistency than partner-focused motivations for faking orgasm.

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... Dock kan fördelen bli till nackdel om inte män förstår kvinnors sexuella anatomi och fysiologi och därmed inte kan stimulera sina kvinnor på ett bra sätt. Samtidigt har kvinnorna ett eget ansvar att se till att få full utdelning på den unika njutningstillgång som de har.Tyvärr visar det sig att många kvinnor fejkar orgasm vid partnersex och oralsex(Barnett et al. 2019). Statistik visar också att kvinnor som har sex med kvinnor har 33% större sannolikhet att få orgasm än när de har sex med män(Willis, et al.2018), vilket visar behovet av större bildning i sexologi för män byggt på senare tiders forskningsrön om kvinnors sexuella anatomi och fysiologi. ...
Book
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Everyone, but especially those who work in healthcare or who influences it, needs to be made aware of the consequences of a number of new trends that have to do with sexology as well as the results of recent medical research that is in some way related to sexology. Therefore, this book is mainly about new important knowledge that has been generated in research and outside research from 2015 to August 2020.Above all, research on women's sexual anatomy and physiology has provided significant new and important knowledge of women's sexuality from having previously much been neglected in research and has it in general been mystified and even been taboo ever since the days of Freud. The book is in Swedish and has, at the end of the book 513 references divided into 185 scientific articles and books and 328 non-fiction and other sources. Approximately 60% of the referenced publications in the book are published from 2018 to July 2020. Approximately 15% are from the period 2015 to 2017. Approximately 11% are from the period 2010 to 2014 and approximately 14% are from the period up to and including 2009. The Swedish paper back book can be bought at stimuera.se
... Thus, it appears that a subset of women who fake orgasm in 1 type of relationship were more likely to do so in other types of relationships-for these women, the tendency to fake orgasm seems more dispositional than situational/contextual, consistent with the idea that "personality type" may play a role in faking orgasm. 5 Such dispositional factors may include any number of internally-derived characteristics, including, for example, women's attachment style, 41 avoiding negative feelings about not reaching orgasm, self-focused reasons related to enhancing arousal, 42 and various beliefs and attitudes. 3,13−17 ...
Article
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Introduction Although faking orgasm among women appears quite common, the roles of orgasmic problems and relationship type in partnered sex and masturbation have not been fully explored. Aim We assessed the relationship between orgasmic problems (separately in partnered sex and masturbation) and faking orgasm across various types of relationships while also considering the role of demographic and sexual function related covariates. Methods In this study of 1,168 Hungarian women, we assessed orgasmic problems, sexual functioning, and the prevalence and frequency of faking orgasm in 3 relationship types: romantic relationships, one-night stands, and continuing sexual relationships of more than one night. Main Outcome Measure Differences in faking orgasm across 3 types of relationships; the association between faking orgasm in 1 type of relationship with faking orgasm in other types of relationships; and the relationship of “orgasmic problems” in partnered sex and masturbation to the presence and frequency of faking orgasm in various relationship types. Results A subset of women who faked orgasm in 1 relationship type were more likely to fake orgasm in other relationship types. Orgasmic problems predicted the occurrence and frequency of faking orgasm in all 3 relationship types, though to different degrees. Other factors, including orgasmic difficulty during masturbation, the frequencies of masturbation and partnered sex, and the self-rated importance of sex were also related to the frequency of faking orgasm. Conclusion Our findings suggest that faking orgasm has both dispositional and situational elements. “Orgasmic problems” in partnered sex was a consistent and robust predictor of the occurrence and frequency of faking orgasm in different relationship types. Hevesi K, Horvath Z, Sal D, et al. Faking Orgasm: Relationship to Orgasmic Problems and Relationship Type in Heterosexual Women. Sex Med 2021;XX:XXXXXX.
... Tyvärr visar det sig att många kvinnor fejkar orgasm vid sex och oralsex med män (Barnett et al. 2019), vilket är svårare för män… Statistik visar också att kvinnor som har sex med kvinnor har 33% större sannolikhet att få orgasm än när de har sex med män (Willis, et al.2018). ...
Preprint
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A book in Swedish with the translated title "Sex as enjoyable medicine" based much on published material the last decade by other researchers. It is aimed to be a popular science book that might remove errors and misunderstandings such as the porn industry is spreading and that can increase knowledge about sexual anatomy for men and women.
Article
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Pretending orgasm is a widespread phenomenon, reported by both men and women. We report here on the development of a new measure to assess reasons for pretending. In three studies, using large diverse samples, we obtained a comprehensive list of reasons for pretending orgasms (Study 1; N = 46) and conducted both exploratory (Study 2; N = 416) and confirmatory (Study 3; N = 1010) factor analyses identifying six reasons for pretending an orgasm: feels good, for partner, not into sex, manipulation/power, insecurity, and emotional communication. Sexual dysfunction was correlated with frequency of pretending orgasms for reasons such as insecure, not into sex, for partner, and emotional communication. Usefulness for future research and clinical implications are discussed.
Article
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Background: The pursuit of sexual pleasure is a key motivating factor in sexual activity. Many things can stand in the way of sexual orgasms and enjoyment, particularly among women. These are essential issues of sexual well-being and gender equality. Objective: This study presents long-term trends and determinants of female orgasms in Finland. The aim is to analyze the roles of factors such as the personal importance of orgasms, sexual desire, masturbation, clitoral and vaginal stimulation, sexual self-esteem, communication with partner, and partner's sexual techniques. Design: In Finland, five national sex surveys that are based on random samples from the central population register have been conducted. They are representative of the total population within the age range of 18-54 years in 1971 (N=2,152), 18-74 years in 1992 (N=2,250), 18-81 years in 1999 (N=1,496), 18-74 years in 2007 (N=2,590), and 18-79 years in 2015 (N=2,150). Another dataset of 2,049 women in the age group of 18-70 years was collected in 2015 via a national Internet panel. Results: Contrary to expectations, women did not have orgasms that are more frequent by increasing their experience and practice of masturbation, or by experimenting with different partners in their lifetime. The keys to their more frequent orgasms lay in mental and relationship factors. These factors and capacities included orgasm importance, sexual desire, sexual self-esteem, and openness of sexual communication with partners. Women valued their partner's orgasm more than their own. In addition, positive determinants were the ability to concentrate, mutual sexual initiations, and partner's good sexual techniques. A relationship that felt good and worked well emotionally, and where sex was approached openly and appreciatively, promoted orgasms. Conclusion: The findings indicate that women differ greatly from one another in terms of their tendency and capacity to experience orgasms. The improvements in gender equality and sexual education since the 1970s have not helped women to become more orgasmic. Neither has the major increase in masturbation habits (among women in general). One challenge for future studies is to understand why women value their partner's orgasms more than their own.
Article
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Introduction: Despite recent advances in understanding orgasm variation, little is known about ways in which sexual orientation is associated with men's and women's orgasm occurrence. Aim: To assess orgasm occurrence during sexual activity across sexual orientation categories. Methods: Data were collected by Internet questionnaire from 6,151 men and women (ages 21-65+ years) as part of a nationally representative sample of single individuals in the United States. Analyses were restricted to a subsample of 2,850 singles (1,497 men, 1,353 women) who had experienced sexual activity in the past 12 months. Main outcome measures: Participants reported their sex/gender, self-identified sexual orientation (heterosexual, gay/lesbian, bisexual), and what percentage of the time they experience orgasm when having sex with a familiar partner. Results: Mean occurrence rate for experiencing orgasm during sexual activity with a familiar partner was 62.9% among single women and 85.1% among single men, which was significantly different (F1,2848 = 370.6, P < 0.001, η(2) = 0.12). For men, mean occurrence rate of orgasm did not vary by sexual orientation: heterosexual men 85.5%, gay men 84.7%, bisexual men 77.6% (F2,1494 = 2.67, P = 0.07, η(2) = 0.004). For women, however, mean occurrence rate of orgasm varied significantly by sexual orientation: heterosexual women 61.6%, lesbian women 74.7%, bisexual women 58.0% (F2,1350 = 10.95, P < 0.001, η(2) = 0.02). Lesbian women had a significantly higher probability of orgasm than did either heterosexual or bisexual women (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Findings from this large dataset of U.S. singles suggest that women, regardless of sexual orientation, have less predictable, more varied orgasm experiences than do men and that for women, but not men, the likelihood of orgasm varies with sexual orientation. These findings demonstrate the need for further investigations into the comparative sexual experiences and sexual health outcomes of sexual minorities.
Article
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The Faking Orgasm Scale for Women (FOS) was designed to assess women's self-reported motives for faking orgasm during oral sex and sexual intercourse. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was conducted on the responses of 481 heterosexual undergraduate females (M age = 20.33 years, SD = 2.48). Results of the EFA revealed that the FOS-Sexual Intercourse Subscale was composed of four factors: (1) Altruistic Deceit, faking orgasm out of concern for a partner's feelings; (2) Fear and Insecurity, faking orgasm to avoid negative emotions associated with the sexual experience; (3) Elevated Arousal, a woman's attempt to increase her own arousal through faking orgasm; and (4) Sexual Adjournment, faking orgasm to end sex. The analysis of the FOS-Oral Sex Subscale yielded four factors: (1) Altruistic Deceit; (2) Insecure Avoidance, faking orgasm to avoid feelings of insecurity; (3) Elevated Arousal; and (4) Fear of Dysfunction, faking orgasm to cope with concerns of being abnormal. Each factor of the two subscales was found to have excellent internal consistency. Confirmatory factor analysis on a separate sample of 398 heterosexual female undergraduates (M age = 20.52 years, SD = 2.55) confirmed the factor structure of each subscale with excellent fit statistics. The FOS should allow researchers and clinicians to better understand why women fake orgasm. Deepening this understanding may serve future research examining sexual desire, satisfaction, and dysfunction as well as have applications in sex and couples' therapy.
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This study examined associations between the pleasurability of various sexual activities and behavioural experience with these activities. Participants were 145 female and 78 male undergraduates. Participants rated the pleasurability of various sexual activities (vaginal intercourse, anal intercourse, receiving oral sex, performing oral sex, masturbation by a partner, and self-masturbation) and answered questions about their experience with these sexual activities. Vaginal intercourse, receiving oral sex, and being masturbated by a partner received the highest,pleasure ratings. For behaviours other than vaginal intercourse and receiving oral sex, pleasure ratings were significantly higher among respondents who had engaged in the activity. Pleasure ratings for several different sexual behaviours were intercorrelated. Participants who scored high on a pleasure index were more sexually experienced, engaged in more frequent sexual activity, and reported having more sex partners. Results are interpreted within the context of an evolutionary theory which suggests that pleasure motivates sexual behaviour.
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This study examines women's social representations of female orgasm. Fifty semi-structured interviews were conducted with British women. The data were thematically analysed and compared with the content of female orgasm-related writing in two women's magazines over a 30-year period. The results indicate that orgasm is deemed the goal of sex with emphasis on its physiological dimension. However, the women and the magazines graft onto this scientifically driven representation the importance of relational and emotive aspects of orgasm. For the women, particularly those who experience themselves as having problems with orgasm, the scientifically driven representations induce feelings of failure, but are also resisted. The findings highlight the role played by the social context in women's subjective experience of their sexual health.
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Past research on the role of cognitive distraction in sexual dysfunction typically has focused on males and has been conducted in the laboratory using artificial stimuli. In the current study, young adult women (N = 74) with coital experience completed questionnaires regarding cognitive distraction and their sexuality. Those women who reported greater cognitive distraction during sexual activity with a partner also reported relatively lower sexual esteem, less sexual satisfaction, less consistent orgasms, and higher incidence of pretending orgasm even after the women's general affect, sexual desire, general self-focus, general sexual attitudes, and body dissatisfaction were statistically controlled. Results are discussed with regard to directions for future research and implications for sex therapy.
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Orgasm is a sensation of intense pleasure creating an altered consciousness state accompanied by pelvic striated circumvaginal musculature and uterine/anal contractions and myotonia that resolves sexually-induced vasocongestion and induces well-being/contentment. In 1,749 randomly-sampled U.S. women, 24% reported an orgasmic dysfunction. To provide recommendations/guidelines concerning state-of-the-art knowledge for management of orgasmic disorders in women. An International Consultation in collaboration with the major urology and sexual medicine associations assembled over 200 multidisciplinary experts from 60 countries into 17 committees. Committee members established specific objectives and scopes for various male and female sexual medicine topics. The recommendations concerning state-of-the-art knowledge in the respective sexual medicine topic represent the opinion of experts from five continents developed in a process over a 2-year period. Concerning the Disorders of Orgasm in Women Committee, there were four experts from two countries. Expert opinion was based on grading of evidence-based medical literature, widespread internal committee discussion, public presentation and debate. Female Orgasmic Disorder, the second most frequently reported women's sexual problem is considered to be the persistent or recurrent delay in, or absence of, orgasm following a normal sexual excitement phase that causes marked distress or interpersonal difficulty (DSM-IV). Empirical treatment outcome research is available for cognitive behavioral and pharmacological approaches. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for anorgasmia promotes attitude and sexually-relevant thought changes and anxiety reduction using behavioral exercises such as directed masturbation, sensate focus, and systematic desensitization treatments as well as sex education, communication skills training, and Kegel exercises. To date there are no pharmacological agents trials (i.e., bupropion, granisetron, and sildenafil) proven to be beneficial beyond placebo in enhancing orgasmic function in women diagnosed with Female Orgasmic Disorder. More research is needed in understanding management of women with orgasmic dysfunction.
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An orgasm in the human female is a variable, transient peak sensation of intense pleasure, creating an altered state of consciousness, usually with an initiation accompanied by involuntary, rhythmic contractions of the pelvic striated circumvaginal musculature, often with concomitant uterine and anal contractions, and myotonia that resolves the sexually induced vasocongestion and myotonia, generally with an induction of well-being and contentment. Women's orgasms can be induced by erotic stimulation of a variety of genital and nongenital sites. As of yet, no definitive explanations for what triggers orgasm have emerged. Studies of brain imaging indicate increased activation at orgasm, compared to pre-orgasm, in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, periaqueductal gray of the midbrain, hippocampus, and the cerebellum. Psychosocial factors commonly discussed in relation to female orgasmic ability include age, education, social class, religion, personality, and relationship issues. Findings from surveys and clinical reports suggest that orgasm problems are the second most frequently reported sexual problems in women. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for anorgasmia focuses on promoting changes in attitudes and sexually relevant thoughts, decreasing anxiety, and increasing orgasmic ability and satisfaction. To date there are no pharmacological agents proven to be beneficial beyond placebo in enhancing orgasmic function in women.
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The relationship between automatic thoughts and emotions presented during sexual activity and their correlation with sexual arousal was investigated. A total of 491 individuals (163 women and 232 men without sexual problems and 47 women and 49 men with a DSM-IV diagnosis of sexual dysfunction) completed the Sexual Modes Questionnaire (SMQ; Nobre and Pinto-Gouveia, Journal of Sex Research, 40, 368-382, 2003). Results indicated several significant correlations among automatic thoughts, emotions, and sexual arousal. Erection concern thoughts in the men and failure/disengagement thoughts and lack of erotic thoughts in the women presented the most significant negative correlations with sexual arousal. Additionally, sadness and disillusion were positively related to these negative cognitions and negatively associated with sexual arousal in both sexes. On the other hand, pleasure and satisfaction were negatively associated with the above-mentioned negative cognitions and positively associated with subjective sexual arousal in both men and women. Overall, findings support the hypothesis that cognitive, emotional, and behavioral dimensions are closely linked and suggest a mode typical of sexual dysfunction composed of negative automatic thoughts, depressive affect, and low subjective sexual arousal.
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This study of heterosexually self-identified introductory psychology students sought to determine whether the sexes would differ in their self-ratings of enjoyment for various sexual activities, how they would attribute enjoyment of each activity to the other sex, and how accurate they would be in such attributions. The 197 female and 150 male participants (mean age 19.3 years) completed questionnaires that assessed self-enjoyment and attribution of enjoyment to the other sex for each of 18 sexual activities. Results indicated that men rated most activities higher in enjoyment than women. However, correlational analyses suggested strong similarities between the sexes in the activities they rated most and least enjoyable. Their attributions of enjoyment to the other sex correlated significantly with their own ratings of enjoyment. Although difference score analyses found a statistically significant difference between men's and women's attributions of level of enjoyment and the other gender's self-reported level of enjoyment, the correlation analysis suggested that men and women were accurate in their attributions of the activities that the other gender would most and least enjoy.
Article
Mindfulness was studied in relation to sexual distress and the ability to achieve orgasm. The initial hypotheses were that mindfulness abilities would predict women's level of sexual distress and that orgasmic women would possess greater mindfulness skills. In total, 251 women (176 orgasmic women and 75 anorgasmic women) responded to several questionnaires online: the Female Sexual Distress Scale – Revised (FSDS-R), the Five-Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ), and the Sexual Five-Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ-S). According to our results, mindfulness during dyadic sexual activities (FFMQ-S) explained 54% of the variability in sexual distress (FSDS-R). Overall, orgasmic women reported more mindfulness than anorgasmic women, both in daily life (FFMQ) and significantly more during dyadic sexual activities (FFMQ-S). In conclusion, our results support the evaluation of women's level of mindfulness during dyadic sexual activities and the integration of mindfulness training in future sex therapy treatments.
Article
While some literature has explored women's sexual satisfaction and, to a lesser degree, women's faking orgasm experiences, little research has examined the context and conditions around women's best and most memorable orgasms. This paper utilised thematic analysis of qualitative data from a community sample of 20 women in the USA (mean age = 34 years, SD = 13.35 years) from a wide range of racial, socioeconomic, and sexual identity backgrounds to illuminate their experiences with fake or pretend orgasms, and with their best orgasms. While faking orgasm narratives reflected themes of wanting to reinforce a partner's sexual skills, strategically ending sexual interactions, and suppressing feelings of abnormality and shame, best orgasm experiences showcased the power of interpersonal connection, the joys of masturbation and other non-penile-vaginal intercourse behaviours, and the significance of 'transformative embodiment'. Implications for the relative failures of (hetero)sex, particularly in the context of gendered power imbalances, along with the importance of deconstructing the sexually 'functional' or 'dysfunctional' woman are explored.
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This article investigates the determinants of orgasm and sexual enjoyment in hookup and relationship sex among heterosexual college women and seeks to explain why relationship sex is better for women in terms of orgasm and sexual enjoyment. We use data from women respondents to a large online survey of undergraduates at 21 U.S. colleges and universities and from 85 in-depth interviews at two universities. We identify four general views of the sources of orgasm and sexual enjoyment—technically competent genital stimulation, partner-specific learning, commitment, and gender equality. We find that women have orgasms more often in relationships than in hookups. Regression analyses reveal that specific sexual practices, experience with a particular partner, and commitment all predict women’s orgasm and sexual enjoyment. The presence of more sexual practices conducive to women’s orgasm in relationship sex explains some of why orgasm is more common in relationships. Qualitative analysis suggests a double standard also contributes to why relationship sex is better for women: both men and women question women’s (but not men’s) entitlement to pleasure in hookups but believe strongly in women’s (as well as men’s) entitlement to pleasure in relationships. More attention is thus given to producing female orgasm in relationships.
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Surprisingly little is known about oral sex experiences among emerging adults, including the motives behind their participation in this sexual activity. The current study examined the characteristics of emerging adults' most recent oral sex experience. A total of 431 young people (M age = 21.7 years; 71.7% female) completed an on-line survey assessing their sexual history, context (partner type, co-occurring sexual behaviors), and motives (physical, emotional, goal attainment, and insecurity) for engaging in their most recent heterosexual oral sex interaction. The majority of oral sex encounters occurred within the context of a committed relationship and during an interaction that also included intercourse. Cunnilingus was rare unless reciprocated with fellatio. Overall, both males' and females' reports indicate that they were motivated to engage in oral sex by sexual desire and attraction to their partner, or to enhance an emotional connection with their partner. Insecurity and goal attainment motives were uncommon. Males reported more physical motives than did females, and females reported more emotional and insecurity motives than did males. The findings provide insights into youths' oral sex experiences, and make clear how essential it is to understand the broader sexual and partnership context in which a given sexual activity occurs. These findings have implications for policies aimed at the development of effective sexual health education programs.
Article
Although studies of specific groups of individuals (e.g., adolescents, "high risk" samples) have examined sexual repertoire, little is known, at the population level, about the sexual behaviors that comprise a given sexual encounter. To assess the sexual behaviors that men and women report during their most recent sexual event; the age, partner and situational characteristics related to that event; and their association with participants' evaluation of the sexual event. During March-May 2009, data from a United States probability sample related to the most recent partnered sexual event reported by 3990 adults (ages 18-59) were analyzed. Measures included sexual behaviors during the most recent partnered sexual event, event characteristics (i.e., event location, alcohol use, marijuana use, and for men, erection medication use), and evaluations of the sexual experience (pleasure, arousal, erection/lubrication difficulty, orgasm). Great diversity exists in the behaviors that occur during a single sexual event by adults, with a total of 41 combinations of sexual behaviors represented across this sample. Orgasm was positively related to the number of behaviors that occurred and age was related to greater difficulty with erections and lubrication. Men whose most recent event was with a relationship partner indicated greater arousal, greater pleasure, fewer problems with erectile function, orgasm, and less pain during the event compared with men whose last event was with a nonrelationship partner. Findings demonstrate that adults ages 18 to 59 engage in a diverse range of behaviors during a sexual event and that greater behavior diversity is related to ease of orgasm for both women and men. Although both men and women experience sexual difficulties related to erectile function and lubrication with age, men's orgasm is facilitated by sex with a relationship partner whereas the likelihood of women's orgasm is related to varied sexual behaviors.
Article
Research shows that many women pretend or "fake" orgasm, but little is known about whether men pretend orgasm. The purpose of this study was to investigate (a) whether, how, and why men pretend orgasm and (b) what men's and women's reports of pretending orgasm reveal about their sexual scripts and the functions of orgasms within these scripts. Participants were 180 male and 101 female college students; 85% of the men and 68% of the women had experienced penile-vaginal intercourse (PVI). Participants completed a qualitative questionnaire anonymously. Both men (25%) and women (50%) reported pretending orgasm (28% and 67%, respectively, for PVI-experienced participants). Most pretended during PVI, but some pretended during oral sex, manual stimulation, and phone sex. Frequently reported reasons were that orgasm was unlikely, they wanted sex to end, and they wanted to avoid negative consequences (e.g., hurting their partner's feelings) and to obtain positive consequences (e.g., pleasing their partner). Results suggest a sexual script in which women should orgasm before men, and men are responsible for women's orgasms.
Article
As individuals become increasingly aware of their sexuality and orgasmic responsiveness, concomitantly, the phenomenon of pretending orgasm is becoming a greater part of the sexual relationship for many couples. However, few studies exist concerning this phenomenon despite the fact that nearly two-thirds of all females have reported pretending orgasm. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to profile those females who have pretended orgasm by examining the dimensions of their sexual and orgasmic behaviors, the factors that inhibit their orgasm, the dynamics of partner interaction, and any desired changes in their sexual lives. A survey research design was employed utilizing the responses of 805 professional nurses who participated in a study concerning self-perceptions of the female sexual response. The findings indicate that those females who have ever pretended orgasm became sexually active at a younger age and have been more sexually explorative than those females who have not pretended orgasm. Furthermore, the role of their sex partners was a significant dimension in their orgasmic pretense. The resultant impact on coupled relationships has many critical implications for therapists.
Article
A THEORY OF SELF-PERCEPTION IS PROPOSED TO PROVIDE AN ALTERNATIVE INTERPRETATION FOR SEVERAL OF THE MAJOR PHENOMENA EMBRACED BY FESTINGER'S THEORY OF COGNITIVE DISSONANCE AND TO EXPLICATE SOME OF THE SECONDARY PATTERNS OF DATA THAT HAVE APPEARED IN DISSONANCE EXPERIMENTS. IT IS SUGGESTED THAT THE ATTITUDE STATEMENTS WHICH COMPRISE THE MAJOR DEPENDENT VARIABLES IN DISSONANCE EXPERIMENTS MAY BE REGARDED AS INTERPERSONAL JUDGMENTS IN WHICH THE O AND THE OBSERVED HAPPEN TO BE THE SAME INDIVIDUAL AND THAT IT IS UNNECESSARY TO POSTULATE AN AVERSIVE MOTIVATIONAL DRIVE TOWARD CONSISTENCY TO ACCOUNT FOR THE ATTITUDE CHANGE PHENOMENA OBSERVED. SUPPORTING EXPERIMENTS ARE PRESENTED, AND METATHEORETICAL CONTRASTS BETWEEN THE "RADICAL" BEHAVIORAL APPROACH UTILIZED AND THE PHENOMENOLOGICAL APPROACH TYPIFIED BY DISSONANCE THEORY ARE DISCUSSED. (2 P. REF.)
Article
This critical review presents a synthesis of the available theoretical and empirical literatures on human orgasm. Findings from both normal and clinical human populations are included. Two major trends in the literature, the dichotomization of biological and psychological perspectives and the assumption of gender differences, are highlighted. A new multidimensional model of the psychological experience of orgasm is described with a view to futhering a biopsychological approach applicable to both sexes. Clinical applications of this new model are discussed.
Reported sexual pleasure among heterosexual men and women: An empirical investigation
  • M D Barnett
  • P R Melugin
Barnett, M. D., & Melugin, P. R. (2016). Reported sexual pleasure among heterosexual men and women: An empirical investigation. Personality and Individual Differences, 98, 62-68. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2016.03.06.
Simultaneous penile-vaginal intercourse orgasm is associated with satisfaction (sexual, life, partnership, and mental health)
  • S Brody
  • P Weiss
Brody, S., & Weiss, P. (2011). Simultaneous penile-vaginal intercourse orgasm is associated with satisfaction (sexual, life, partnership, and mental health). Journal of Sexual Medicine, 8, 734-741. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1743-6109.2fahs010.02149. x.jacwade.