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Proceedings of CPS&IoT2019 (Cyber Physical Systems and Internet of Things)

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Abstract

INTRODUCTION:: Cyber comes from Greek adjective kyberneticos (cybernetic) which means skilled in steering or governing. Already from ancient times people constructed various machines (physical systems) and their controllers (cyber systems). Cyber-physical system (CPS) is a compound system engineered through integration of cyber and physical sub-systems or components, so that it appears and operates as a single unit in relation to the external world (to other systems). With the progress of time, machines and their controllers became more and more complex. Until the end of the 19th century the controllers (cyber systems) were implemented as mechanical, hydraulic and pneumatic systems. In the 20th century they started to be gradually replaced by the electric controllers, and later by the electronic controllers. Introduction of transistors and integrated circuit technologies in the years 1950s and 1960s, correspondingly, enabled the microelectronics and information technology revolution that is progressing according to the Moore’s low till now. The revolutionary progress in computing platforms, communication, networking, sensors and actuators enabled much more effective and efficient CPS for traditional applications, and “smart”, sophisticated and affordable CPS for numerous new applications, e.g. smart communicating robots, cars, wearable and implantable medical devices, etc. Contemporary cyber-physical systems (CPS) are smart compound systems engineered through seamless integration of embedded information processing sub-systems and physical sub-systems. The modern smart collaborating CPS, that started to form the Cyber-Physical Systems of Systems (CPSoS) and Internet of Things (IoT), have important applications in virtually all economic and social segments, and their huge economic and societal impact rapidly increases. The CPS and IoT area undergoes a revolutionary development. There is however a common opinion that many more welltrained researchers and developers are needed in this rapidly developing area, as well as, more information exchange and collaboration among different projects and teams in the area. This Summer School on Cyber-Physical Systems and Internet-of-Things (CPS&IoT’2019) aims at serving the following main purposes: - advanced training of industrial and academic researchers, developers, engineers and decisionmakers; academic teachers, Ph.D. and M.Sc. students; entrepreneurs, investors, research funding agents, and policy makers; and other participants who want to learn about CPS and IoT engineering; - dissemination, exchange and discussion of advanced knowledge and project results from numerous European R&D projects in CPS and IoT; - promotion and facilitation of international contacts and collaboration among people working or interested in the CPS and IoT area. The school is open to everybody, but previous knowledge or equivalent practical experience at least at the Bachelor level in engineering (e.g. system, computer, electronic, electrical, automotive, aviation, mechanical, or industrial engineering), computer science, informatics, applied physics or similar is recommended. Industry Participation is encouraged. CPS&IoT’2019 Summer School is not only to follow courses and learn new knowledge on CPS and IoT from top professionals, but to meet people, interact and discuss with outstanding researchers, developers, academic lecturers, advanced students, and other participants, collaborate or start collaborations, and meet many talented people who may become employees of your companies as well. Distinguishing features of this advanced Summer School are that its lectures, demonstrations, and practical hands-on sessions will be given by top European specialists in particular CPS and IoT fields form industry and academia, and will deliver very fresh advanced knowledge. They are based on results from numerous currently running or recently finished European R&D projects in CPS and IoT, what gives an excellent opportunity to get acquainted with issues and challenges of CPS and IoT development; actual industrial problems, designs and case studies; and new concepts, advanced knowledge and modern design methods and tools created in the European R&D projects. CPS&IoT’2019 Summer School is collocated with ECYPS2019 – 7th EUROMICRO/IEEE Workshop on Embedded and Cyber-Physical Systems, and MECO2019 – 8th Mediterranean Conference on Embedded Computing. The Summer School participants are encouraged to submit their papers to ECYPS2019 and MECO2019: http://embeddedcomputing.me/en. The CPS&IoT’2019 Summer School Program is composed of four days of lectures, demonstrations, practical hands-on sessions, and discussions, as well as free participation in ECYPS 2019 and MECO 2019 sessions. The topics of the lectures, demonstrations, and practical hands-on sessions cover major CPS applications (focusing on modern mobile applications that require high-performance or low energy consumption, as well as, high reliability, security and safety), computing technology for modern CPS, CPS architectures, development problems and solutions, as well as, design methodologies and design tools for all CPS design phases. Detailed list of the CPS&IoT’2019 Presentations including the names of their authors and presenters is provided in the Schedule of the CPS&IoT’2019 Summer School. This Summer School is possible thanks to involvement of many outstanding researchers and developers from multiple European countries, R&D projects and teams. The Chairmen of the CPS&IoT’2019 Summer School express their thanks to all authors and presenters of the CPS&IoT’2019 presentations, as well as, to all other people who contributed to the success of the Summer School, and wish a very effective and pleasant Summer School time to all the CPS&IoT’2019 participants. Chairs: Lech Jóźwiak Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands and Radovan Stojanović University of Montenegro, Montenegro CONTENT: Lech Jóźwiak, Introduction to Modern Cyber-Physical Systems and their Quality-Driven Design, 1 Henk Corporaal, Embedded Processors for Cyber-Physical Systems, 66 Jiří KadlecKadlec , Zdeněk Pohl ,Lukáš Lukáš Kohout, Implementation of Implementation of HW -accelerated video -processing on industrial Zynq modules, 127 Francesca Palumbo, Claudio Rubattu, Carlo Sau, Tiziana Fanni, Luigi Raffo, Dataflow-Based Toolchain for Based Toolchain for Adaptive Accelerators, 149 Eugenio Villar, Megamodelingof complex, distributed, heterogeneous CPS systems, 288 Jesús Gorroñogoitia, Execution of software models, 308 Marc Geilen, Mladen Skelin, Hadi Alizadeh, Bram van der Sanden, João Bastos , Max plus linear models for cyber-physical systems, 326 Michael Paulweber and Andrea Leitner, Comprehensive modular V&v framework for automated cyber-physical systems, 372 Vittoriano Muttillo, Luigi Pomante, Design space exploration for Hypervisor-based mixed-criticality systems, 435 Axel Jantsch, Self-aware CPS, 517 Dip Goswami, Sajid Mohamed, Sayandip De, Tradeoff analysis between Quality-of-Control and degree of approximate computing for image based control systems, 622 Radek Fujdiak, Security of Embedded and Cyber Physical Systems, 652 Muhamed Shafique, Brain-Inspired Computing for Smart CPS and IoT, 677 Christoph Schmittner and Thomas Gruber, Safety & security engineering of automotive CPS, 744 Lorenzo Strigini and Peter Popov, Probabilistic modelling integrating concerns of safety, security, etc., 793 Dominique Blouin, Maysam Zoor and Ludovic Apvrille, Practical Embedded Systems Modeling and Safety, Security and Performance Verification with TTool, 846 Razi Seyyedi, Sören Schreiner Virtual Platforms for Low-power Mixed-criticality Embedded Systems Development and Validation 940
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