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Population Ageing in Turkey: Social and Health Care Services for Older People

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What is it like to grow old in Turkey, a country at the crossroads of developed and developing societies and a country situated in a dynamically changing area of the world? The distinguished scientists, clinicians and scholars who have contributed to this text provide a comprehensive overview of Population Ageing in Turkey: Health and social care services for older persons all come from centres of research and learning throughout Turkey. They work in disciplines directly involved in all aspects of dealing with the complications of older persons. The coverage provides a valuable source of information concerning the resources and deficits present in Turkey at this time. The editors, Marvin Formosa and Yeşim Gökçe Kutsal, are themselves recognized authorities in these areas. They have organized the material in a logical sequence to ensure coverage of the reality of growing old in Turkey. Each chapter provides definitions of terms specific to that discipline so that the material covered is meaningful and accessible to specialists as well as non-specialists in the different areas. As such, the book is a resource for all regarding the particular areas discussed.
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Gelişmiş Batılı ülkelerde nüfusun yaşlandığı saptanmakta, bu eğilimin devam etmesi durumunda yaşlılık sorununun önemli boyutlara varacağı beklenmektedir. Teknolojik ve sosyal gelişmelerle birlikte doğum ve ölüm oranlarında meydana gelen azalmalar, yaşlılığın toplam nüfus içerisindeki oranını yükseltmiş, başka bir deyişle nüfus yaşlanmıştır. Her ne kadar ülkemizdeki bu oran. Batı ülkelerindeki eğilimlere kıyasla çok daha düşük olsa da, 3.5 milyona yaklaşan sayılarıyla yaşlılar, ülkemizde önemli bir sosyal kesimi oluşturmaktadırlar. Ayrıca yaşlı nüfusun toplam nüfusa oranı, son yıllarda Türkiye'de de giderek artmaktadır. Nüfusun yaşlanması ve yaşlı nüfusun üretken nüfusa bağımlılığının toplumsal, ekonomik, kültürel ve siyasi sorunlar yaratabileceği kaygısı, toplumda yaşlı kesimler için gerekli sosyal politikalar üretme çabalarına olan ihtiyacı giderek artırmaktadır. Ancak bu ihtiyacın sağlıklı bir şekilde tespit edilebilmesi için, önce yaşlılık alanının kendine özgü dinamiklerinin ve sorunlarının bilimsel yöntemlerle analiz edilmesi gerekmektedir. Bu bağlamda bu proje, ülkemizdeki yaşlı nüfusun hem yaşam aranjmanlarını hem de ekonomik, sosyal ve kültürel yaşam örüntülerini Ankara İli içerisinde yapılan niteliksel bir araştırmanın bulguları ışığında betimlemeyi hedeflemektedir.
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