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Physio-Chemical Analysis of Water Samples Collected from Jummapatti Area, Neral, Maharashtra

Authors:
International Journal of Trend in
International Open Access Journal
ISSN No: 2456
@ IJTSRD | Available Online @
www.ijtsrd.com
Physio-Chemical
Analysis
Dr. Leena
Muralidharan
1
V. K. K. Menon College of Commerce and S.S. Dighe College of
2
Thadomalshahani Engineering College, Mumbai
ABSTRACT
Water is a natural resource for human life. Demand
for fresh water increased in last decades due to
increase in population. The quality of wate
affected due to water pollution that has caused an
adverse impact on human health. The drinkable water
should be of good quality and its study on parameters
gives a perfect analysis. The present study was
conducted to evaluate the water quality in Jum
hill station which is situated at Neral-
Matheran route
in Maharashtra. “Jummapatti waterfall” is an
attractive tourist point. To check the water quality,
water sample were collected from different area of
Jummapatti. Water quality parameter such as
dissolved oxygen, free carbon dioxide, phosphates,
total hardness, turbidity, and pH were measured using
standard methods. This research article provides
useful information about the current status of the
physio-chemical
parameters of water quality in
Jummapatti, Maharashtra.
Keyword:
jummapatti hill station, physio
analysis, water quality
INTRODUCTION
Water is the main component for all living organism.
It is very essential for all cells, tissues and organs and
International Journal of Trend in
Scientific
Research and Development (IJTSRD)
International Open Access Journal
|
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ISSN No: 2456
- 6470 | Volume - 2 | Issue –
6 | Sep
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| Volume – 2 | Issue – 6 | Sep-
Oct 2018
Analysis
of Water Samples
Collected f
Jummapatti Area,
Neral, Maharashtra
Muralidharan
1, Dr. Sangeeta Gaur1, Chinmay
Muralidharan
V. K. K. Menon College of Commerce and S.S. Dighe College of
Science,
Mumbai
Thadomalshahani Engineering College, Mumbai
, Maharashtra, India
Water is a natural resource for human life. Demand
for fresh water increased in last decades due to
increase in population. The quality of wate
r is
affected due to water pollution that has caused an
adverse impact on human health. The drinkable water
should be of good quality and its study on parameters
gives a perfect analysis. The present study was
conducted to evaluate the water quality in Jum
mapatti
Matheran route
in Maharashtra. “Jummapatti waterfall” is an
attractive tourist point. To check the water quality,
water sample were collected from different area of
Jummapatti. Water quality parameter such as
dissolved oxygen, free carbon dioxide, phosphates,
total hardness, turbidity, and pH were measured using
standard methods. This research article provides
useful information about the current status of the
parameters of water quality in
jummapatti hill station, physio
-chemical
Water is the main component for all living organism.
It is very essential for all cells, tissues and organs and
work as a building block for
Waldegger, 1997; Je´quierl and Constant 2010). The
Joint Monitoring Programme (JMP) for Water Supply
and Sanitation, implemented by the World Health
Organisation (WHO) and UNICEF (2013), reported
that 768 million people have no access to saf
drinkable water, out of which 83% of them belongs to
rural areas. According to Meyback
quality means “the suitability of water to sustain
various uses or processes”. Microbiological
contamination is a major problem of the quality of the
drinking water beside this water can be contaminated
by inorganic components (Sorlini
are some factors which have adverse effect on water
quality such as changes in climate, increased
population, and increase requirement of food and
energy (Sinhaet al.,
2018). The use of quality water is
the biggest challenge for 21
2018). Best water quality is essential for everyone as
polluted water has adverse effect on health of not only
to animals but also to human (Meng
Extreme climate changes also increases the risk of
contamination in water (
both surface and ground
water) (Cross and Latorre, 2015). Decline in water
quality is also caused by waste release from human
and industries (Gupta et. al.,
2017).
Fig. 1: Map showing study area
Research and Development (IJTSRD)
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– Oct 2018
Oct 2018
Page: 1117
Collected f
rom
Muralidharan
2
Mumbai
, Maharashtra, India
, Maharashtra, India
work as a building block for
them (Lang and
Waldegger, 1997; Je´quierl and Constant 2010). The
Joint Monitoring Programme (JMP) for Water Supply
and Sanitation, implemented by the World Health
Organisation (WHO) and UNICEF (2013), reported
that 768 million people have no access to saf
e and
drinkable water, out of which 83% of them belongs to
rural areas. According to Meyback
et. al., (1996) water
quality means “the suitability of water to sustain
various uses or processes”. Microbiological
contamination is a major problem of the quality of the
drinking water beside this water can be contaminated
by inorganic components (Sorlini
et. al., 2013). There
are some factors which have adverse effect on water
quality such as changes in climate, increased
population, and increase requirement of food and
2018). The use of quality water is
the biggest challenge for 21
st century (Sinhaet. al.,
2018). Best water quality is essential for everyone as
polluted water has adverse effect on health of not only
to animals but also to human (Meng
et. al., 2018).
Extreme climate changes also increases the risk of
both surface and ground
water) (Cross and Latorre, 2015). Decline in water
quality is also caused by waste release from human
2017).
International Journal of Trend in Scientific Research and Development (IJTSRD) ISSN: 2456
@ IJTSRD | Available Online @
www.ijtsrd.com
Fig.2: Jummapatti Waterfall
Fig. 3: Jummapatti
Hill Station
Materials and method:
In the present study water sample were taken from
different locations of
Jumaapatti hill station,
Maharashtra (Fig.1, 2 and 3). The water quality
parameters such as dissolved oxygen, pH,
temperature, total hardness and
phosphate were
measured. Standard methods (APHA, 2005) were
used for the analysis.
Result and discussion:
pH is the basic measurement for water quality, it tell
us the acidic or basic nature of water. In the present
study pH recorded was 8.5 (Table 1) whi
alkaline nature of the water sample collected from
Jummapatti area. A pH range of 6.0 to 9.0 appears to
provide protection for the life of fresh water fish and
bottom dwelling invertebrates (Kumar and Puri, 2012;
Muralidharan and Waghode, 2014
; Muralidharan
al.,
2015). The pH of safe water ranges between 6.5 to
8.0 and this pH is dependent on the source of water,
soil type, contaminants in water (Kale, 2016). High
International Journal of Trend in Scientific Research and Development (IJTSRD) ISSN: 2456
www.ijtsrd.com
| Volume – 2 | Issue – 6 | Sep-
Oct 2018
Fig.2: Jummapatti Waterfall
Hill Station
In the present study water sample were taken from
Jumaapatti hill station,
Maharashtra (Fig.1, 2 and 3). The water quality
parameters such as dissolved oxygen, pH,
phosphate were
measured. Standard methods (APHA, 2005) were
pH is the basic measurement for water quality, it tell
us the acidic or basic nature of water. In the present
study pH recorded was 8.5 (Table 1) whi
ch shows the
alkaline nature of the water sample collected from
Jummapatti area. A pH range of 6.0 to 9.0 appears to
provide protection for the life of fresh water fish and
bottom dwelling invertebrates (Kumar and Puri, 2012;
; Muralidharan
et.
2015). The pH of safe water ranges between 6.5 to
8.0 and this pH is dependent on the source of water,
soil type, contaminants in water (Kale, 2016). High
pH observed in the present study may be due to the
decomposition of allochthon
photosynthetic activity of phytoplankton
(Muralidharan and Waghode, 2014; Muralidharan
al., 2015).
Table 1: Physio-
chemical parameters of water
samples collected
from Jummapatti area
Quality parameter
pH
Temperature
Table 2: Physio-
chemical parameters of water
samples collected from Jummapatti area
Quality parameter
Result(Mean ± SEM)
Dissolved oxygen
4.95 mg/l ± 0.0021
Total Hardness
60.08 mg/l ± 0.025
Carbon di oxide
5.055 mg/l± 0.017
Phosphate
1.58 mg/l ± .0021
High pH causes a bitter taste in water, irritation to the
eyes, skin, and mucous membrane (WHO, 1996).
In the present investigation temperature of water
recorded was 19 C to 29
C (Table 1). According to
Cross and Latorre (2015)
climate changes induces the
high water temperature, which is related to reduction
in dissolved oxygen in water. The present
observations have been true for several water bodies
in India (Narayanaet. al.,
2008; Garg
Vermaet. al.,
2011; Prabhake
Meenakshi
saxena, 2012). According to Koliyar and
Rokade (2008) water temperature shows a variation
with atmospheric temperature.
Dissolved oxygen was
recorded in the present work
was 4.96 mg/l(Table 2). It reflects the amount of
gaseo
us oxygen dissolved in water. Low dissolved
oxygen content shows the anaerobic conditions in
water (Koliyar and Rokade, 2008). In the present
study low dissolved oxygen may be due
water which carry many suspended solid compounds
such as bact
eria, hydrocarbons, heavy metal and
suspended solids. These components can interrupt the
sun light to enter in to the water. This interruption
may induce the reduction of the oxygen level in water.
This is also supported by
Koliyar
and Rokade (2008) suggested that low
quantity of dissolved oxygen in water is a indicator
for low production of primary aquatic ecosystem.
International Journal of Trend in Scientific Research and Development (IJTSRD) ISSN: 2456
-6470
Oct 2018
Page: 1118
pH observed in the present study may be due to the
decomposition of allochthon
ous matter and high
photosynthetic activity of phytoplankton
(Muralidharan and Waghode, 2014; Muralidharan
et.
chemical parameters of water
from Jummapatti area
Quality parameter
Result
8.5
19ᵒC -29 ᵒC
chemical parameters of water
samples collected from Jummapatti area
Result(Mean ± SEM)
4.95 mg/l ± 0.0021
60.08 mg/l ± 0.025
5.055 mg/l± 0.017
1.58 mg/l ± .0021
High pH causes a bitter taste in water, irritation to the
eyes, skin, and mucous membrane (WHO, 1996).
In the present investigation temperature of water
C (Table 1). According to
climate changes induces the
high water temperature, which is related to reduction
in dissolved oxygen in water. The present
observations have been true for several water bodies
2008; Garg
et. al., 2009;
2011; Prabhake
ret. al., 2012 and
saxena, 2012). According to Koliyar and
Rokade (2008) water temperature shows a variation
with atmospheric temperature.
recorded in the present work
was 4.96 mg/l(Table 2). It reflects the amount of
us oxygen dissolved in water. Low dissolved
oxygen content shows the anaerobic conditions in
water (Koliyar and Rokade, 2008). In the present
study low dissolved oxygen may be due
to run over of
water which carry many suspended solid compounds
eria, hydrocarbons, heavy metal and
suspended solids. These components can interrupt the
sun light to enter in to the water. This interruption
may induce the reduction of the oxygen level in water.
This is also supported by
Chine duet. al.,(2011).
and Rokade (2008) suggested that low
quantity of dissolved oxygen in water is a indicator
for low production of primary aquatic ecosystem.
International Journal of Trend in Scientific Research and Development (IJTSRD) ISSN: 245
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Hardness of water represent the dissolved minerals in
water i.e. calcium and magnesium (WHO, 2009;
Sengupta, 2013; M
uralidharan and Waghode, 2014).
Total hardness of Jummapatti water sample recorded
was 60.12 mg/l (Table 2) can also affect the osmo
regulation in fishes (Chineduet. al.,
2011). High value
of hardness in drinking water can cause laxative
effects (Sengupta,
2013; Akram and Fazal
Rehman, 2018).Jummapatti water sample adjudged as
soft water throughout the study (Sawyer 1960).
According to Das, (1996) the optimum hardness for
fish production was found to be around 75 to 150
mg/l.
In the present study carbon
dioxide content in
Jummapatti water sample
recorded was
(Table 2). This low value of CO2
may be attributed to
high level of pH in present research work.
The phosphate level content in the sample water was
1.59 mg/l observed (Table 2), may be du
precipitation, animal wastes, fertilizers, and land
runoff (Holt et. al.,
1970), weathering of phosphorus
bearing rocks or leaching from soils of nearby
catchment areas (Muralidharan and Waghode2014).
The recommended value of phosphorus in drinking
water according to EPA 5
mg/l (Singh,
2016).According to Kumar and Puri (2012) phosphate
can exist in water as particles or as aquatic
They also suggested that in normal condition
phosphate does not have any adverse effect but the
high level of it
can cause digestive problems.
Conclusion:
Water quality is affected by various human and
natural activities. Our study indicates that water
collected from Jummapattihill station has high level
of pH, phosphate and hardness whereas the low
amount of dissolved oxygen, and CO
2
Jummapatti water sample can be placed under
alkalliphious and entropic water body (Lee
1981). High fish production can be expected from this
area as a phosphorous contain is above 0.02 mg/l.
During our study
we found that garbage’s, water
bottle, dry and wet waste are dumped by tourist in
Jummapatti waterfall area which can add to the reason
of pollution and can prove to be harmful for the
ecosystem. Sensitive measure must be taken through
proper planning towa
rds this nature gifted wet land.
Awareness has to be created regarding the importance
of Jummapatti for common public and concern
authorities.
From the present study, it can be
International Journal of Trend in Scientific Research and Development (IJTSRD) ISSN: 245
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| Volume – 2 | Issue – 6 | Sep-
Oct 2018
Hardness of water represent the dissolved minerals in
water i.e. calcium and magnesium (WHO, 2009;
uralidharan and Waghode, 2014).
Total hardness of Jummapatti water sample recorded
was 60.12 mg/l (Table 2) can also affect the osmo
2011). High value
of hardness in drinking water can cause laxative
2013; Akram and Fazal
-ur-
Rehman, 2018).Jummapatti water sample adjudged as
soft water throughout the study (Sawyer 1960).
According to Das, (1996) the optimum hardness for
fish production was found to be around 75 to 150
dioxide content in
recorded was
5.09 mg/l
may be attributed to
high level of pH in present research work.
The phosphate level content in the sample water was
1.59 mg/l observed (Table 2), may be du
e to
precipitation, animal wastes, fertilizers, and land
1970), weathering of phosphorus
bearing rocks or leaching from soils of nearby
catchment areas (Muralidharan and Waghode2014).
The recommended value of phosphorus in drinking
mg/l (Singh,
2016).According to Kumar and Puri (2012) phosphate
can exist in water as particles or as aquatic
organisms.
They also suggested that in normal condition
phosphate does not have any adverse effect but the
can cause digestive problems.
Water quality is affected by various human and
natural activities. Our study indicates that water
collected from Jummapattihill station has high level
of pH, phosphate and hardness whereas the low
2
was recorded.
Jummapatti water sample can be placed under
alkalliphious and entropic water body (Lee
et. al.,
1981). High fish production can be expected from this
area as a phosphorous contain is above 0.02 mg/l.
we found that garbage’s, water
bottle, dry and wet waste are dumped by tourist in
Jummapatti waterfall area which can add to the reason
of pollution and can prove to be harmful for the
ecosystem. Sensitive measure must be taken through
rds this nature gifted wet land.
Awareness has to be created regarding the importance
of Jummapatti for common public and concern
From the present study, it can be
concluded that to minimize the water related problems
the quality of water shou
ld be checked regularly.
avoid water pollution waste materials and garbage
dumping should be prohibited in the study area.
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