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Disaster Risk Reduction Knowledge Service: A Paradigm Shift from Disaster Data Towards Knowledge Services

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  • Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
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Abstract and Figures

Earthquakes have caused tremendous damage in China and around the world; the Wenchuan earthquake that occurred in China 10 years ago is among the deadliest earthquakes in history. The importance of earthquake monitoring and seismic data analysis is now recognized in China. However, the effective dissemination of earthquake-related disaster risk reduction (DRR) knowledge to decision-makers and the public has not been adequately addressed. Under the auspices of the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the International Knowledge Centre for Engineering Science and Technology (managed by the Chinese Academy of Engineering) launched the Disaster Risk Reduction Knowledge Service in 2016. This service, based on the development of disaster metadata standards, was constructed to share disaster information and provide thematic knowledge services; it facilitates the integration and sharing of disaster data, disaster maps, expert opinions, institutional knowledge, research literature, and videos. A series of earthquake DRR knowledge services applications have been implemented using this knowledge service platform, including (1) a global earthquake daily distribution map service, (2) a spatiotemporal map of historical earthquakes in the One Belt One Road region, (3) a Wenchuan earthquake disaster relief knowledge service, and (4) a thematic knowledge service for disaster relief work and contingency planning during the Jiuzhaigou earthquake. In the long term, this system will support the conversion of disaster data into DRR knowledge and provide services for international organizations, government institutions, research and educational institutions, enterprises, and the general public.
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Disaster Risk Reduction Knowledge Service: A Paradigm Shift from Disaster Data Towards
Knowledge Services
JUANLE WANG,
1,4,6
KUN BU,
2
FEI YANG,
1,4,6
YUELEI YUAN,
1,6
YUJIE WANG,
1,6
XUEHUA HAN,
1,3,6
and
HAISHUO WEI
1,5,6
Abstract—Earthquakes have caused tremendous damage in
China and around the world; the Wenchuan earthquake that
occurred in China 10 years ago is among the deadliest earthquakes
in history. The importance of earthquake monitoring and seismic
data analysis is now recognized in China. However, the effective
dissemination of earthquake-related disaster risk reduction (DRR)
knowledge to decision-makers and the public has not been ade-
quately addressed. Under the auspices of the United Nations
Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the
International Knowledge Centre for Engineering Science and
Technology (managed by the Chinese Academy of Engineering)
launched the Disaster Risk Reduction Knowledge Service in 2016.
This service, based on the development of disaster metadata stan-
dards, was constructed to share disaster information and provide
thematic knowledge services; it facilitates the integration and
sharing of disaster data, disaster maps, expert opinions, institutional
knowledge, research literature, and videos. A series of earthquake
DRR knowledge services applications have been implemented
using this knowledge service platform, including (1) a global
earthquake daily distribution map service, (2) a spatiotemporal map
of historical earthquakes in the One Belt One Road region, (3) a
Wenchuan earthquake disaster relief knowledge service, and (4) a
thematic knowledge service for disaster relief work and contin-
gency planning during the Jiuzhaigou earthquake. In the long term,
this system will support the conversion of disaster data into DRR
knowledge and provide services for international organizations,
government institutions, research and educational institutions,
enterprises, and the general public.
Key words: Earthquake disaster, disaster risk reduction, data
sharing, knowledge service.
1. Introduction
The Earth is mankind’s only home, but it is not a
completely stable planet. According to current
statistics, earthquakes of Richter magnitude 8.0, 7.0,
6.0, 5.0, and [2.0 occur 2–3 times, *20 times,
*180 times, *2000 times, and *1,000,000 times
every year around the world, respectively. Due to the
tremendous damage caused by earthquakes, earth-
quake monitoring and data acquisition have become
important priorities for many countries. China, one of
the first countries to begin monitoring earthquakes,
has been recording their occurrence since 2300 BCE
when Zhang Heng invented the seismoscope during
the Han Dynasty. Seismograph stations have been
constructed on a large scale since the founding of the
People’s Republic of China, thus establishing a
multidisciplinary, multicategory seismographic net-
work that covers the entirety of the country. This
seismographic monitoring network includes seismic,
electromagnetic, deformation, and fluid monitoring
networks, as well as a mobile physical field moni-
toring system whose measurement lines have a
cumulative length of 150,000 km (Liu and Peng
2009). To improve the management of seismology
data, the China Earthquake Administration (CEA)
officially launched the China Earthquake Data Center
(CEDC, http://data.earthquake.cn) on 28 September
2016, at the National Earthquake Disaster Mitigation
1
State Key Laboratory of Resources and Environmental
Information System, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural
Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing
100101, China. E-mail: wangjl@igsnrr.ac.cn
2
Northeast Institute of Geography and Agroecology, Chi-
nese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130102, Jilin, China.
3
University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing
100049, China.
4
Jiangsu Center for Collaborative Innovation in Geograph-
ical Information Resource Development and Application, Nanjing
210023, China.
5
School of Civil and Architectural Engineering, Shandong
University of Technology, Zibo 255049, China.
6
The International Knowledge Centre for Engineering Sci-
ences and Technology (IKCEST) under the Auspices of UNESCO,
Beijing 100088, China.
Pure Appl. Geophys. 177 (2020) 135–148
Ó2019 Springer Nature Switzerland AG
https://doi.org/10.1007/s00024-019-02229-w Pure and Applied Geophysics
Content courtesy of Springer Nature, terms of use apply. Rights reserved.
... The iterative development model is adopted, so the system can be put into use in the system's development life cycle. Through this system, users can gain quick access to various disaster-related knowledge resources and subject-specific knowledge services, including data, maps, literature and videos (Wang et al., 2020a). The overall method of building the sub-platform is to take the standard formulation for disaster-related metadata as the starting point to collect various knowledge resources, including a metadata-based disaster science database, disaster map resources, a disaster expert database, a disaster institution database, a disaster event database, a database of disaster open directory projects, a database of disaster-related information web mining, a disaster literature database, a disaster popular science database, and a disaster video courseware database. ...
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