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Nýsköpun: Getur gervigreind gert endurhæfingu skilvirkari? [Novel Innovation: Can Artificial Intelligence make Rehabilitation more Efficient?]

Authors:
  • The University of Stirling

Abstract

Demand for Vocational Rehabilitation in Iceland has been steadily rising in recent years where the presence of young patients has increased proportionally the most. It is essential that public spending is efficient without compromising the treatment quality. It is worth exploring if a solution for increasing the efficiency in this healthcare section is to use Artificial Intelligence (AI). An innovative project on developing, testing, and implementing specialised AI software in its services is being performed in Janus Rehabilitation. The software, named Völvan in Icelandic, can identify latent areas of possible interest in patient's circumstances which might affect the outcome of their treatment, and assist specialists in providing timely and appropriate interventions. The accuracy, precision, and recall of its predictions have been verified in two recent publications. Völvan seems to be a promising tool for individualised rehabilitation, where patients are dealing with difficult and complex problems. Janus Rehabilitation is in the process of launching Völvan as an unbiased member of the interdisciplinary teams of specialists. The aim of this report is to introduce Völvan and the associated research.
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