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Tutorial: Wireless Communications with Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

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Tutorial: Wireless Communications with Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

Abstract

The full version of the tutorial given during ICC 2019 in Shanghai. Content: Intro: (i) Applications of UAVs; (ii) Communication links & use; (iii) main wireless communication challenges. Channel modelling fundamentals: (i) Channel component; (ii) Overview of popular models. Performance of LTE and Wi-Fi for aerial users estimated via (i) theory; (ii) simulations; (iii) measurements. Aerial Base Stations for future cellular networks: (i) Motivation and challenges; (ii) Network design (power, optimal positioning, coverage, capacity, achievable rates); (iii) Localization service. UAV detection: (i) Passive RF sensing; (ii) Passive Radar; BONUS: mmWave & beamforming influence on the performance.
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... A few other works specifically tackled communication channels experienced by drones. For instance, the authors in [12] provided a tutorial on UAV-aided wireless communications, describing the existing radio propagation models most suitable for UAV applications. Although the t-locationScale distribution is mentioned, there are no further details, and not even findings based on real data in jamming scenarios. ...
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... where P Rx is the received power, P T x is the transmitted power, P L is the pathloss, and G T x , G Rx are Tx, Rx antenna gain, respectively, γ th is the receiver sensitivity, and is the link margin. Pathloss is formulated by using the line of sight (LoS) / non-LoS (NLoS) air-to-ground (A2G) model as follows [7]: ...
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