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Open Innovation in a Start-up Firm

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Growth, success and survival depend on the capability of the firms to innovate and network continuously. The purpose of this book chapter is to explore the impact of open innovation in the start-up firm growth. SMEs are capable to develop innovation, but not many of them are able to manage the whole innovation process. This implies the need for collaboration of SMEs with others, such as other firms or academic and research institutions. The research approach is based on a single case study by interviewing an innovative firm in Kosovo, Formon 3D Printer. The empirical findings show a low level of open innovation with establishment of Formon 3D. They managed to collaborate with only one professor of University of Prishtina at the beginning stage. Indeed, open innovation has its crucial importantly, especially for start-ups in transition countries. Yet, challenges to effective collaboration still remain as entrepreneurs often question their partners’ commitment to supporting firm growth. This study provides findings valid for innovative private firms in Kosovo, and should not be generalized to other firms in Kosovo, the region or beyond.
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